Management Articles

IThere are only three measurements that tell you nearly everything you need to know about your organization’s overall performance: employee engagement, customer satisfaction, and cash flow”.
                                                                                                                                                                               – Jack Welch
Organizations have widely acknowledged the fact that a “Happy worker is a productive worker”. The missing link to derive customer satisfaction and in return draw profits has been discovered. But what really is an engaged employee?
Every individual, whether working at CXO level or front line executive level, has their own benchmark to job satisfaction. For somebody money is the motivation while for other it could be mere job he does. What really matters nowadays is that organizations realize that they don’t leave any missing block in keeping an employee connected to the values, culture and overall goal of an organisation.
An engaged employee will always strive to take positive actions to further the organization’s repute and interests. He is enthusiastically absorbed well into the culture of the organization and lives it by committing to give his 100% each day. There is an emotional connect that employee feels which binds him and influences him to work better each day.
With changing time, it has become mandatory for organizations to carry out programs, activities and policies that keep employees engaged and connected only because of the increasing competition and available options for employees to look out for.
It’s a candidate’s market, so it can be easy for employees to become disconnected and slip away to competing firms. But selecting the right technology for employee engagement can stop disengagement in its tracks.
There are multiple engagement systems available today, but the right one will include the following elements:

  • Frequent check-ins with employees (vs. annual reporting). Morale increases when employees are actively sharing their thoughts and feelings about engagement and being heard by management.
  • Communication tools that open up dialogue. It can be difficult for employees to pinpoint areas where they are unhappy. However, a direct communication system built into the engagement platform can enable more open communication and support. Incentives for participation. When employees know they are actively contributing to the overall improvement of their workplace, they are more likely to participate.
  • Real-time reporting on multiple levels. Organizations should be able to see at a moment’s glance the state of employee engagement using reports that are based on data, multiple levels and visuals.

So does it mean that more competitions and open market has created kind of disloyalty within the employees? Or has it all come down to dedication of an employee? If your employees are already disgruntled, throwing too many perks at them may only create a culture of entitlement.
For any organization that offer its’ employees work life balance, sense of accomplishment for work, growth opportunity (individual as well as hierarchical), training, mentoring and development activities, rewards & recognition and best policies, practices and performance management structure, is making every effort to keep his employee engaged. These provide motivation enough to the individuals to work for better, growth and organization.
Increasingly, organizations are focusing on improving their employee engagement to drive better performance. According to a research, employee engagement is strongly connected to business outcomes essential to an organization’s financial success, such as productivity, profitability and customer engagement. Engaged employees drive the innovation, growth and revenue that growing midsize companies need to thrive.

 

Email Etiquette

Email Etiquette is the ethics of behavior that one should using while writing emails or answering them. Email Etiquette Training can be listed under behavioral training or Corporate Communication Training. Because email is more professional and secured than a phone or in-person conversation and quicker to send than a letter, it is possible for serious breaches of manners to take place.
Use of email became universal in the early 90s, the business world changed completely that time. Email now takes up a considerable portion of our workday.
International Data Corporation (IDC) study says workers spend 28 percent of their workweek reading and answering email.
We try to work faster and more efficiently, but at the same time we must not forget the common conventions that accompany any form of communication. Here are some of the dos and don’ts of email etiquette.
Do have subject line clear.
Many of us have to compete with the hundreds of emails clogging our inbox every day, so the clearer your subject line, the more likely your message will be read. For example, if you’re sending a request for meeting to someone, be specific and write, “Meeting request for XYZ reason.”
Don’t forget your signature.
Emails must include a signature that tells the receiver who you are and how to contact you. Set it up to automatically appear at the end of each email. Include all of your contact details so the recipient doesn’t have to look up your address, email or phone number.
Do use a professional salutation.
Using “Hey,” “Yo,” or “Hiya” isn’t professional, no matter how well you know the recipient. Use “Hi” or “Hello” instead. To be more formal, use “Dear (insert name).” Using the person’s name in the salutation — “Hello Robert” — is quite appropriate, but remember not to shorten a person’s name unless you’re given permission to do so.
Don’t use humor.
What you think is funny has a more chances of being misinterpreted by the receiver. Humor does not interpret via email all the times. Keep humor away from business talks.
Do proofread your message.
Don’t get shocked if you’re judged by your way of composing emails. For example, if your email is having misspelled words and grammatical mistakes, you may be supposed as careless or even uneducated. Check your spelling, grammar and message before sending.
Don’t assume the recipient knows what you are talking about.
Create your message as a stand-alone note, even if it is in response to a chain of emails. This means no “one-liners.” Include the subject and any references to previous emails, research or conversations. It can be frustrating and time consuming to look back at the chain to brush up on the context. Your recipient may have hundreds of emails coming in each day and likely won’t remember the chain of events leading up to your email.
Do reply to all emails.
Give a timely and polite reply to each legitimate email addressed to you. Even if you do not have an answer at the moment, take a second to write a response letting the sender know you received their email. Inform the sender if their email was sent to the wrong recipient, too.
Don’t shoot from the lip.
Never send an angry email, or give a quick, flip response. Give your message some thoughtful consideration before sending it. If you feel angry, put your message into the “drafts” folder, and review it again later when you are calmer and have time to formulate an appropriate response.
Do keep private material confidential.
It is far too easy to share emails, even inadvertently. If you have to share highly personal or confidential information, do so in person or over the phone. Ask permission before posting sensitive material either in the body of the email or in an attachment.
Don’t! Overuse exclamations.
Exclamation marks and other indications of excitement such as emoticons, abbreviations like LOL, and all CAPITALS do not translate well in business communications. Leave them off unless you know the recipient extremely well. It’s also not professional to use a string of exclamation points!!!!!
It may take some practice to keep your emails professional and to the point, but you will look more polished and organized in the long run.
Source: Entrepreneur

 

8 Customer Skills Every Employee Needs

Every employee should master certain customer service skills, if they are forward-facing with customers. Without them, you will risk your business in losing customers as your service continues to let people down.
1. Empathy, patience and consistency:
Some customers will be irate; others will be full of questions. And others will just want to chat. You must know how to tackle all of them and provide the best service every time.
 2. Attentiveness:
The ability to really listen to customers is so crucial for providing great service to them. Not only it is important to pay attention to individual customer interactions (listening the language/ words that they use to describe their queries), but it’s also important to be attentive to the feedback that you receive every time.
3. Clear communication:
Ensure you convey to customers exactly what you mean and you are not making him confused. You don’t want your customer to think he’s getting 50% off but actually he’s getting 50% more product. Use authentically positive language, stay cheerful irrespective of anything and never end a conversation without ensuring the customer is satisfied.
4. Knowledge:
The best forward-facing employees in your company must work on having a deep knowledge of your product. In any company it’s not that every team member should be able to build your product from base, but rather they should know the ins and outs of how your product, just like a customer who uses it every day would.
5. Acting Skills:
The customer’s always right… right? The ability to swallow one’s pride and accept blame or negative feedback is crucial. Every time your team works directly with customers or looking for feedback on social media channel, they’ve got to keep the customer’s happiness in mind at high priority.

6. Ability to Handle Surprises:
Every customer is different, and some may even seem to change weekly or monthly. You should be ready to handle surprises, sense the customer’s mood and adapt accordingly.
 7. Willingness to Learn:
If you came across this article and read all the way to the bottom, you likely already have this skill (nice!). This is probably the most “general” skill on the list, but it’s still necessary.
8. Closing Ability:
This has nothing to do with “closing sales” or other related terms. Its’ being able to close with a customer means being able to close the conversation with confirmed satisfaction and with the customer feeling that everything has been taken care of.
Providing excellent customer service to your clients or customers should be the number one priority for your business. Without it you’ll just be spinning wheels trying to gain new clients without helping the old.

 

Highly Efficient Team Building Training Program And Practices

How to building highly efficient team???
Training Without Boundaries Learning has good experience and masters in Team Building training program and is known for its best practices.
Generally teams are formed by gathering few people having domain knowledge and then expecting them to find a way to work together. This is the case with most of the teams in action today. But this is not the best practice, if you want the highly effective teams working for the organization. Teams become most effective when designed carefully.
To design, develop and support a highly effective team, following guidelines can be followed:

  1. Setting ‘SMART’ Goals:

The goals should be designed to be “SMART.” This is an acronym for:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Relevant and
  • Time-bound.

 

As much as possible, include input from other members of the organization when designing and wording these goals.

  1. Objectives for measuring the effectiveness:

The objectives, that together achieve the overall goals, should also be designed to be “SMART.”

  1. Clear communication channel for Team:

To work effectively as a team, ‘Communication’ plays very important role. Consistent communication is the most important trait of a successful team. Without communication, none of the other traits can occur.

  1. Procedures for Decision Making and Problem Solving:

Decision making is non separable function for any tam. Every team frequently faces the situations where they must make some decision and solve problem in highly effective manner.

Best practices for successful groups:

  • Document a procedure whereby the team can make decisions and ensure that all members are aware of the procedure.
  • The procedure might specify that decisions are made, within time frame and agreed by all.
  1. Develop staffing procedures (recruiting, training, organizing, replacing):

For achieving the success in Effective team building, a staffing procedure must be developed with major functions of recruiting, training, organizing and replacing. If group members go through a somewhat organized, systematic process, then new members often believe that the group is well organized and that their role is very valuable in the group.

  1. Determine the membership of the group:

Consider the level of proficiency needed to achieve the goals, including areas of knowledge and skills. Include at least one person who has skills in facilitation and meeting management. Attempt to include sufficient mixture of values and perspectives to ensure robust ideas and discussion.

  1. Assign the role of leader: to ensure systems and practices are followed.

The leader focuses on the systems and practices in the team, not on personalities of its members. Leader ensures that his team follows the systems and best practices helpful in achieving defined goals.

  1. Assign role of communicator:

Communication is most important factor for team success. One in the team should be dedicatedly designated to make sure that all members receive communications about Goals, membership, roles, responsibilities and status regularly.

  1. Identify needs for resources:

Start from analyzing the purpose and goals, this will let you know what is needed to achieve them? Here training, materials, supplies, etc can be the example of resources needed.

  1. Identify the costs to provide necessary resources for the team:

Training and consulting cost, Material costs, rents for rooms and machinery, cost for other office supplies are to be considered here.

  1. Plan team building activities to support trust and working relationships:

Team building is critical task. Teammates must trust the potential of each other, they must support each other for achieving goals which leads to successful working relationships. There are many small activities for it, Google will give you in detail idea.

  1. Carefully plan the first team meeting:

First meeting aims at review the goals of the team, why each member was selected, the benefit of the goals to the organization, the time frame for the team effort, who will lead the team (at least, initially), when the team might meet and where, and any changes that have occurred since the individual meetings

  1. Monitoring and reporting :

Allow team to share a documents or reports which enables to see progress of team members toward achieving the goal. It is amazing how often a team starts out with a carefully designed plan, but trust them to get the work done and if it’s not then lets clear it to everyone. This level of visibility helps in identifying problems early.

  1. Support team meetings:

It is always critical for supervisors of team to remain available to for his team members and to provide support and resources as needed. Apart from this the supervisor should regularly monitor team members’ progress and he should provide them an ongoing encouragement and visibility.

  1. Celebrate team members’ accomplishments!

At last, always celebrate achievements and success with team member because team members should not feel as if they are on treadmill that has no end. Keep your eye on small and recurring successes, not just the gold at the end of the rainbow.

 

Challenges Introverted Leaders Face And How To Overcome Them

Introverts are often overlooked for leadership roles because of their naturally quieter nature. The portrayal of introverts, however, is changing for the better as more and more people realize their traits can be well-suited for modern leadership roles. (Let’s not forget some of the world’s great leaders, like Rosa Parks and Abraham Lincoln, were introverts.)
Neither extroverts nor introverts are necessarily better; it’s more that each has their own unique strengths and weaknesses, and those who make the best leaders know how to capitalize on these.
12 members from Forbes Coaches Council discuss how to do just that: overcome the challenges and harness your introverted qualities as strengths.

 

1. Get Out of Your Head
Introverts tend to process internally, and as a result, don’t always communicate their thinking to the team. Introverts can be hard to read, which leaves extroverts and employees often uncertain and uncomfortable. Provide your team with information in multiple ways. Make them feel in the loop and watch productivity soar. – Michelle Tillis Lederman, Executive Essentials
2. Be Brave and Push Yourself
I see a difference as an opportunity for me to position myself as unique. Regardless of a person’s introversion or extroversion, it’s the relationship with people that matters as aleader. We all have to learn to push ourselves if we want to grow personally and professionally. For introverts, that means we have to push ourselves into conversations and into situations where we are vulnerable. – Jessica Miller-Merrell, Blogging4Jobs
3. Learn to Tell Stories
Humans are hard-wired to learn and remember through stories. Introverted leaders are adept at communicating their vision and values one-on-one. Tell stories by painting a picture of a challenge you encountered, the choices you made, and the outcome. Your community can carry that story forward, contributing to your professional narrative. Storytelling can make you a potent and charismatic leader. – Jeff Rock, Swift River Coaching LLC
4. Practice and Plan
Interacting with others saps an introvert‘s energy and/or creates anxiety for them. Extensive practice to master the “work demands” for any given meeting frees up energy needed for the “people component” of that meeting. In addition, planning in advance and anticipating how to approach and interact with others will help gain a sense of control, and therefore, decrease anxiety. – Julie P. Kantor, Ph.D., JP Kantor Consulting
5. Avoid the Lone Ranger Syndrome
There’s an old adage: “If you want it done right, do it yourself!” Were these the words of an introvert? Because constant people interaction drains their energy, introvertedleaders will instinctively look for ways to fly solo whenever possible. This can backfire; going solo too often can look like isolation or arrogance. Aim for a healthy balance of solo and team work. When you do go it alone, be transparent about your process. – Beth Buelow, The Introvert Entrepreneur
6. Be Yourself, Get to Know Others, and Bend as Needed
While we all have natural tendencies and preferences, labeling and placing people in boxes can be dangerous. The two greatest skills of successful leadersare the ability to connect and influence. To do this you need to know yourself and others well and then flex or bend sometimes (i.e., How can you communicate so he understands you well? What type of work environment does she thrive in? What tasks best suit him?).   – Anu Mandapati, IMPACTLeadership for Women

 

7. Stop Labeling Yourself as an Introvert
The first thing I’d recommend is to stop labeling yourself as an introvert. Labeling is dangerous territory and brings with it a lot of baggage that isn’t your truth. Focus on the things that are unique about you. Are you detail-oriented? Are you a quick study with strong strategic skills? Focus and talk about things that energize you, your skills and your passions. Be yourself. – Cha Tekeli, Chalamode, Inc.

 

8. Let Active Listening Be a Positive Thing
Introverts by their very nature are great listeners. Strong leaders must have skills in listening, engaging and communicating. Allow yourself to step outside the box and see your active listening as a positive. Rise to the challenge by being open to the opinions of others, being fearless in asserting yourself, and marketing your active listening to the benefit of your organization. – Wendi Weiner, JD, NCRW, CPRW, CCM, The Writing Guru

 

9. Prioritize Alone Time
I often see that introverted leaders don’t get enough alone time to think if they are working in an office setting. They need to be proactive about ensuring they have that time for themselves — separate from others and any draining stimuli. There are so many ways to carve that time for yourself, like spending the first hour of the day at home. Alone time is definitely a key to success for introverts. – Laura Garnett, Garnett Consulting LLC

 

10. Don’t Over-Utilize Your Strengths
An introverted leader‘s best qualities are powerful — the ability to think deeply, quietly assess situations and people, manage emotions, etc. However, when we over-utilize our strengths, they become our biggest roadblocks to being the connected and inspiringleaders that are desired and needed. We must find our gaps and fill them bravely. Do this at least once daily: connect, communicate and care. – Monique Catoggio, Monique Catoggio, Inc.

 

11. Take Time to Connect Before and After Meetings
I’ve coached many introverted leaders and one common challenge is getting overwhelmed or out-talked in meetings. Many introverts find it much easier to connect and share ideas one-to-one than to jockey for airtime in a meeting. A great strategy is to schedule pre- and post-meeting briefings with key players so your ideas are heard, absorbed and incorporated into the full discussion. – Jo Ilfeld, Success Reboot

 

12. Find Time to Recharge
Introverted leaders are always balancing brain fatigue. The most successful introvertedleaders find ways to carve out 10-15 minutes during the work day for quiet decompression time to recharge their empty social/people tank. In addition, they always leave one or two evenings a week free from work or social obligations to recharge. – Lindsay Guthrie, The Career Path Partners

 

 

50 Rules for Being a Great Leader

If becoming a great leader in your own business or organization is your goal, these 50 rules are a good place to start:

  1. Listen to your team.Rule one. Always listen to what your team has to say, even if you don’t like it.
  2. Communicate as efficiently as possible.Make your expectations and feelings clear, in the appropriate medium as often as possible.
  3. Talk less.Sometimes saying nothing is better than saying just anything.
  4. Be an example.Be the type of person you want your team members to be.
  5. Be passionate.If you aren’t passionate about your business, you’re in the wrong business.
  6. Be consistent.Be consistentin your behaviors so your team knows what to expect from you.
  7. Make firm decisions. Don’t leave things undecided for long, and don’t waver about a decision once you’ve made it.
  8. Identify mentors and role models. Find people you can look up to and learn from, and follow them closely.
  9. Interfere only when necessary. If you trust your team to do good work, don’t interfere unless absolutely necessary.
  10. Know your limits. Don’t extend yourself beyond your means.
  11. Know your strengths.If you’re good at resolving disputes, step in and resolve them as often as possible.
  12. Know your weaknesses.If there’s something you’re not good at, admit it, and work on it.
  13. Don’t make excuses.If you make a mistake, take ownership of it and don’t pass the blame to someone or something else.
  14. Accept the unforeseen.You can’t control or predict everything.
  15. Choose your partners carefully.Work only with people you can count on and trust.
  16. Do good.Commit yourself to being a good person and giving back to the community when possible.
  17. Meet new people all the time.Take every opportunity to expand your network and expose yourself tonew experiences and perspectives.
  18. Stay in touch with your emotions.Don’t be a robot — let yourself feel.
  19. Temper your reactions.Hold back your reactions until you have a moment to clarify your internal thoughts and feelings.
  20. Have fun.Take the time to have fun with your team.
  21. Research everything.Before making a decision, know the pros and cons — do your homework.
  22. Think everything through.Never exclusively trust your instincts or first reactions.
  23. Choose your team carefully.Hire only those you can trust to get the job done (and to get along with others, as well).
  24. Prioritize your team.Your team is everything. Give them whatever they need to succeed.
  25. Be humble.Don’t get big-headed about your wealth, influence or position as a leader.
  26. Forgive mistakes.Everyone makes them.
  27. Forgive yourself.Don’t beat yourself up too much over anything. Move on.
  28. Be rational.Make decisions logically.
  29. Be reasonable.Listen to dissenting opinions, and be fair.
  30. Make time for what’s important.There’s no such thing as “not having time” for what’s really important in your life. Make the time.
  31. Constantly learn. Read as much as you can, and take classes whenever you have the opportunity.
  32. Improve everything.Work on improving your approaches, your skills and your processes constantly.
  33. Never give up.Don’t throw in the towel when alittle extra persistence could put you over the edge.
  34. Transform your methods when necessary.If something isn’t working, change your approach.
  35. Cut your losses when necessary.If you’re fighting a losing battle, retreat and start again somewhere else (or in a new way).
  36. Learn from your mistakes.Try not to make the same mistakes twice.
  37. Ground everything with data.Back up all your decisions, opinions and thoughts with hard, objective facts and evidence.
  38. Don’t ignore signs of stress.Stress is real and can interfere with your ability to lead. If it starts setting in at abnormal levels, take action to reduce or relieve it.
  39. Give feedback.Let your team know what they’re doing well and what needs further improvement.
  40. Trust, but verify.Trust your team to get things done, but always follow up to make sure the work is completed.
  41. Be approachable.Let people know they can trust you, and open your door to anybody who need it.
  42. Treat everyone equally.Don’t play favourites; it breeds resentment and makes you appear immature as a leader.
  43. Don’t pursue close personal relationships with the team.Be on friendly terms, but don’t try to be best friends with everybody. You’re a leader, first and foremost.
  44. Get the team together.Use team-building exercises or other excuses to get your team members talking with one other and having fun together.
  45. Return favours.If someone helps you, make it your responsibility to pay back the favour — even if it’s years later.
  46. Don’t burn bridges.Never cut a contact completely out of your life.
  47. Stay in touch.If team members leave or change roles, stay in contact with them.
  48. Don’t sacrifice your personal life.Your personal life is necessary to retain your own mental health. Never sacrifice it for the sake of leadership or professional responsibilities.
  49. Enjoy leadership.Try not to stress too much about being a leader. Instead,enjoy all the benefits it offers.
  50. Take advice with a grain of salt.Even with these 50 rules! Because nobody knows everything, and no one piece of advice applies to all situations.

Follow these rules, trust your instincts and continually strive for self-improvement. Eventually, through your experiences and your efforts, you’ll become the type of leader most people only aspire to be.
Source: Entrepreneur

Leadership Challenges

Introverts are often overlooked for leadership roles because of their naturally quieter nature. The portrayal of introverts, however, is changing for the better as more and more people realize their traits can be well-suited for modern leadership roles. (Let’s not forget some of the world’s great leaders, like Rosa Parks and Abraham Lincoln, were introverts.)
Neither extroverts nor introverts are necessarily better; it’s more that each has their own unique strengths and weaknesses, and those who make the best leaders know how to capitalize on these.
12 members from Forbes Coaches Council discuss how to do just that: overcome the challenges and harness your introverted qualities as strengths.

 

1. Get Out of Your Head
Introverts tend to process internally, and as a result, don’t always communicate their thinking to the team. Introverts can be hard to read, which leaves extroverts and employees often uncertain and uncomfortable. Provide your team with information in multiple ways. Make them feel in the loop and watch productivity soar. – Michelle Tillis Lederman, Executive Essentials
2. Be Brave and Push Yourself
I see a difference as an opportunity for me to position myself as unique. Regardless of a person’s introversion or extroversion, it’s the relationship with people that matters as aleader. We all have to learn to push ourselves if we want to grow personally and professionally. For introverts, that means we have to push ourselves into conversations and into situations where we are vulnerable. – Jessica Miller-Merrell, Blogging4Jobs
3. Learn to Tell Stories
Humans are hard-wired to learn and remember through stories. Introverted leaders are adept at communicating their vision and values one-on-one. Tell stories by painting a picture of a challenge you encountered, the choices you made, and the outcome. Your community can carry that story forward, contributing to your professional narrative. Storytelling can make you a potent and charismatic leader. – Jeff Rock, Swift River Coaching LLC
4. Practice and Plan
Interacting with others saps an introvert‘s energy and/or creates anxiety for them. Extensive practice to master the “work demands” for any given meeting frees up energy needed for the “people component” of that meeting. In addition, planning in advance and anticipating how to approach and interact with others will help gain a sense of control, and therefore, decrease anxiety. – Julie P. Kantor, Ph.D., JP Kantor Consulting
5. Avoid the Lone Ranger Syndrome
There’s an old adage: “If you want it done right, do it yourself!” Were these the words of an introvert? Because constant people interaction drains their energy, introvertedleaders will instinctively look for ways to fly solo whenever possible. This can backfire; going solo too often can look like isolation or arrogance. Aim for a healthy balance of solo and team work. When you do go it alone, be transparent about your process. – Beth Buelow, The Introvert Entrepreneur
6. Be Yourself, Get to Know Others, and Bend as Needed
While we all have natural tendencies and preferences, labeling and placing people in boxes can be dangerous. The two greatest skills of successful leadersare the ability to connect and influence. To do this you need to know yourself and others well and then flex or bend sometimes (i.e., How can you communicate so he understands you well? What type of work environment does she thrive in? What tasks best suit him?).   – Anu Mandapati, IMPACTLeadership for Women

 

7. Stop Labeling Yourself as an Introvert
The first thing I’d recommend is to stop labeling yourself as an introvert. Labeling is dangerous territory and brings with it a lot of baggage that isn’t your truth. Focus on the things that are unique about you. Are you detail-oriented? Are you a quick study with strong strategic skills? Focus and talk about things that energize you, your skills and your passions. Be yourself. – Cha Tekeli, Chalamode, Inc.
8. Let Active Listening Be a Positive Thing
Introverts by their very nature are great listeners. Strong leaders must have skills in listening, engaging and communicating. Allow yourself to step outside the box and see your active listening as a positive. Rise to the challenge by being open to the opinions of others, being fearless in asserting yourself, and marketing your active listening to the benefit of your organization. – Wendi Weiner, JD, NCRW, CPRW, CCM, The Writing Guru
9. Prioritize Alone Time
I often see that introverted leaders don’t get enough alone time to think if they are working in an office setting. They need to be proactive about ensuring they have that time for themselves — separate from others and any draining stimuli. There are so many ways to carve that time for yourself, like spending the first hour of the day at home. Alone time is definitely a key to success for introverts. – Laura Garnett, Garnett Consulting LLC
10. Don’t Over-Utilize Your Strengths
An introverted leader‘s best qualities are powerful — the ability to think deeply, quietly assess situations and people, manage emotions, etc. However, when we over-utilize our strengths, they become our biggest roadblocks to being the connected and inspiringleaders that are desired and needed. We must find our gaps and fill them bravely. Do this at least once daily: connect, communicate and care. – Monique Catoggio, Monique Catoggio, Inc.
11. Take Time to Connect Before and After Meetings
I’ve coached many introverted leaders and one common challenge is getting overwhelmed or out-talked in meetings. Many introverts find it much easier to connect and share ideas one-to-one than to jockey for airtime in a meeting. A great strategy is to schedule pre- and post-meeting briefings with key players so your ideas are heard, absorbed and incorporated into the full discussion. – Jo Ilfeld, Success Reboot
12. Find Time to Recharge
Introverted leaders are always balancing brain fatigue. The most successful introvertedleaders find ways to carve out 10-15 minutes during the work day for quiet decompression time to recharge their empty social/people tank. In addition, they always leave one or two evenings a week free from work or social obligations to recharge. – Lindsay Guthrie, The Career Path Partners
Source: Forbes

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