Donor Directory

The aim of this  donor directory is to empower members of the non-profit and development sector. This edition serves to supply grant seekers in third world countries  with a range of updated and easily accessible information on the fundraising processes, from how to register your organisation, to information on the donor environment.

This directory is for a broad audience within Public, non-profit and development/ humanitarian sector.

Regardless of whether you are  a  well-established non-profit organisation or, one that is just starting out, we trust that you will find information that is relevant to your concerns. This directory aims to equip you with tools that can assist your organisation in improving and consolidating its fundraising efforts and working towards a more sustainable future.

The organizations included in this Donor Directory have their focus on diverse areas, such as poverty alleviation; science and technology; health; population; and industrial and agricultural development. The profiles of the organizations have been arranged in terms of their work /operation, the long term organizational objectives, and the programs and projects currently being undertaken by them. You can find more tips on fundraising in the Blog link of this Website. We have also provided a link for International Fundraisers incase your fundrasing skills are limited  and want assistance to raise funds.

 Call for Proposals and Fundraising Platforms

www.virginmoneygiving.com

www.euroresources.org

www.angelinvestmentnetwork.com

www.globalinnovationfund.com

MAJOR BILATERAL AND MULTILATERAL DONORS

GRANT FOR NON GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

The following includes grants for NGOs and organizations. NGOs and Organizations which run projects to improve the livelihoods of local communities stand a good chance of getting the grants.

  1. ARRL INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN AWARD.

The 2011 ARRL International Humanitarian Award “is conferred upon an amateur or amateurs who demonstrate devotion to human welfare, peace and international understanding through Amateur Radio.
·  The League established the annual prize to recognize Amateur Radio operators who have used ham radio to provide extraordinary service to others in times of crisis or disaster.”
·  “A committee appointed by the League’s President recommends the award recipient(s) to the ARRL Board, which makes the final decision. The committee is now accepting nominations from Amateur Radio, governmental or other organizations that have benefited from extraordinary service rendered by an Amateur Radio operator or group.
·  Amateur Radio is one of the few telecommunication services that allow people throughout the world from all walks of life to meet and talk with each other, thereby spreading goodwill across political boundaries. The ARRL International Humanitarian Award recognizes Amateur Radio’s unique role in international communication and the assistance amateurs regularly provide to people in need.
·  Nominations should include a summary of the nominee’s actions that qualify the individual (or individuals) for this award, plus verifying statements from at least two people having first-hand knowledge of the events warranting the nomination.
·  Nominations should include the names and addresses of all references.
·  All nominations and supporting materials for the 2011 ARRL International Humanitarian Award must be submitted in writing in English to ARRL International Humanitarian Award, 225 Main St, Newington, CT 06111 USA.
·  In the event that no nominations are received, the committee itself may determine a recipient or decide to make no award. The recipient (or recipients) of the ARRL International Humanitarian Award receive an engraved plaque and a profile in QST and other ARRL venues.

CONTACT ADDRESS:

ARRL. The National Association For Amateur Radio

225 Main Street Newington, CT, 06111-1494 USA

  1. Tel: 1-860-594-0200
    Fax: 1-860-594-0259
    Email: hq@arrl.org
  2. ACCESS TO LEARNING AWARD – BILL & MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION.

Access to Learning Award: A program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation the Access to Learning Award honors “innovative organizations that are opening a world of online information to people in need.”
The foundation’s Global Libraries initiative invites applications from libraries and similar organizations outside the United States that have created new ways to offer these key services:
·  free public access to computers and the Internet;
·  public training to assist users in accessing online information that can help improve their lives;
Technology training for library staff;
·  and outreach to under served communities.
Applications are open to institutions outside the United States that are working with disadvantaged communities.
To be eligible, the applying institution must allow all members of the public to use computers and the Internet free of charge in a community space.
In addition Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation looks for organizations that:
·  Help reduce inequities in neglected areas
·  Produce measurable results
·  Catalyze increased momentum, scale, and sustainability of change
·  Collaborate with government, philanthropic, private-sector, and not-for-profit partners
·  Favor preventative approaches
·  Leverage support from other sources
·  Advance our current strategies, accelerating the work we are already supporting

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
P.O.BOX 23350,Seattle, WA 98102
Email: Info@gates foundation.org.

 

3.ABBOT FUND GRANTS – NGO FUNDING.

Abbott Fund is a private not-for-profit organization which invests in creative ideas that promote science, expand access to health care, and strengthen communities worldwide.
In partnership with others, Abbott Fund strive to make a lasting impact on people’s lives and encourage others to action.
Abbott Fund approach is to support programs that are results-driven and make a lasting impact on people’s lives.
Major areas of program funding include:
·  Global AIDS Care – The Fund supports HIV programs in the poorest countries of the world hardest hit. The programs key areas are; strengthening health care systems, helping children affected by HIV/AIDS, preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and expanding access to testing and treatment.
·  Access to Health Care – The global health programs seek innovative solutions to improve and expand access to health care services for disadvantaged populations. Specific areas of focus include cardiovascular health, diabetes, nutrition, maternal and child health and neonatal care.
·  Science and Medical Innovation – Abbott Fund supports new approaches to learning that are designed to foster a better understanding of science and medical innovation and the value they bring to improving human health.
·  Community Vitality – Abbott Fund is active in communities around the world where Abbott has a significant presence. Emphasis is placed on improving access to health care and promoting science education. Abbott Fund will not grant to the following entities:
·  Individuals
·  For-profit entities
·  Purely social organizations
·  Political parties or candidates
·  Sectarian religious organizations
·  Trade or business associations
Abbott Fund only accepts requests for funding online.
Abbott Fund. Abbott Park, Illinois, U.S.A
CONTACT ADDRESS.

.AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The principal aim of the African Development Foundation (ADF)’s grants is to enable grassroots groups in Africa to generate increased income through productive enterprises that expand the overall economic production capacity and increase the economic security of their families and communities.
ADF provides small grants of US$250,000 or less to private and other non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Africa to:
·  Finance sustainable poverty alleviating initiatives that are conceived, designed, and implemented by Africans and aimed at enlarging opportunities for community development;
·  Stimulate and expand the participation of Africa’s economically poor in the development of their countries; and
·  Build sustainable African institutions that foster grassroots development.
ADF only provides funding to organisations based in African countries where it works and has offices.
Presently, ADF works in: Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
ADF provides unsolicited grant support for projects focused on the development of micro- and small enterprises, export trade and investment activities of small and medium-scale enterprises, and participatory community development projects.
ADF may from time to time issue a Request for Applications (RFAs) for other activities.
Follow the links below for more details and application contacts.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
African Development Foundation
1400 1 Street, NW, 10th Floor Washington DC
20005-2248,USA
Tel: +1 202 673 3916
Fax: +1 202 673 3810
Email: info@adf.gov.

  1. AFRICAN DOCTORAL DISSERTATION RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP.

African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship: The African Population and Health Research Centre (APHRC) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) are pleased to announce the third Call of the ADDRF awards.
The fellowship program awards dissertation fellowships to African doctoral students enrolled in sub-Saharan Africa universities who are conducting health-systems or sexuality related research.
By providing financial and research support, the program aims at encouraging doctoral students to pursue their training in the region, and thus contribute to the quality of university education in sub-Saharan Africa.
Specifically, this project aims to:
·  Shorten the amount of time it takes to complete doctoral studies
·  Strengthen the quality of these dissertations and the candidates
·  Retain a new generation of highly skilled and locally trained African scholars in research, policy and academic positions within the region
Eligibility:
·  The African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowships are awarded to advanced doctoral students who are within two years of completing their doctoral thesis at an African university.
·  The fellowships target individuals whose research show great promise of making substantive contribution to strengthening health systems or show great promise of enhancing the understanding of governance, equity, health or population-related issues in Africa.
·  The program primarily supports doctoral research (including data collection).
·  Coursework is not considered for support.

CONTACT  ADDRESS:

  • The Communications Manager
  • African Population & Health Research Center
  • APHRC Campus, 2nd Floor
  • Manga Close, Off Kirawa Road
  • Email: info@aphrc.org
  • Telephone: +254 (20) 400 1000, 266 2244, or 266 2255
  • Mobile: +254 722 205 933, 733 410 102
  • P.O. Box 10787-00100,
  • Nairobi, Kenya
  • Fax: + 254 (20) 400 1101

AFRICAN FOUNDATION GRANTS.

Africa Foundation is an independent registered non-profit organisation in South Africa and has Public Benefit Organisation (PBO) status.
The Foundation currently manage six major programmes in addition to over forty smaller projects in South Africa, Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Namibia.
Africa Foundation’s primary focus is on:
Education – To build preschools and classrooms, develop bursary programmes, teach environmental awareness, conduct vocational training, facilitate adult education programmes and build capacity in our communities.
Health Care – To build and equip clinics and support their operation, run HIV/AIDS awareness programmes, help provide access to clean water, provide health care and counselling.
Income-Generating Activities – Identifying opportunities and help start-ups but in particular, stimulate the potential for income generation through a highly successful skills training programme and through access to technology.
The Foundation funds and manages projects based on the needs within the specific communities.
The Foundation’s projects assist in the protection of Africa’s great natural wonders (such as the Serengeti in Tanzania and the Kruger National Park in South Africa) through the socio-economic development of rural populations living in or close to these conservation areas.
The projects are identified through needs analysis studies and community-generated proposals.
Africa Foundation provides:
·  Project management
·  Administration
·  Donor relations
·  Implementation expertise
·  Monitoring and evaluation.
Who should apply?
Charities that are working in rural African Communities, bordering wilderness conservation areas – particularly those who are working in partnership with successful eco-tourism organizations.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Wendy Wood, Executive Director
Africa Foundation (USA)
P.O. Box 233
Friday Harbor, WA 98250
Telephone: (360) 370-5746
Fax:  (866) 210-7150
Email: inquiries@africafoundation.org
Facebook:  Africa Foundation (USA)

7.AFRICAN GRANT MAKERS AFFINITY GROUP – AGAG.

The Africa Grantmakers’ Affinity Group (AGAG) is a network of funders who have formed an association where they can share and learn from each other about the most effective ways to support development efforts in Africa.
Annual Retreat:
Each year AGAG hosts an Annual Retreat. The 2009 Annual Retreat will explore the theme “Connecting Knowledge: Education, Health, and Civil Society.”
Research on Funding Trends:
AGAG conducts research on funding trends.
Become a Member of AGAG:
If you a grantmaker and would like to join a commmunity that values learning, sharing and exploring ways to be more effective in your work, consider becoming a member.
For Grantseekers:
AGAG is not a funding organization and does not review proposals or assist with fundraising, but we have compiled some general information to assist organizations in Africa seeking funding.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Africa Grantmakers’ Affinity Group
1776 I Street, NW Suite 900
Washington, DC 20006
Telephone: 202-756-4835
Email: contactus[@]agag.org

  1. AFRICAN ORGANIZATION GRANTS.

Africa Organizations Grants: The Rockefeller Foundation and The Tony Elumelu Foundation invite proposals from Africa organizations interested in receiving support for initiatives aimed at fostering Africa’s Impact Economy, specifically by aiding the growth of the Impact Investing industry and social enterprise sector.

Africa NGOs Grant Areas

The Africa Impact Economy Innovations Fund (IEIF) will fund projects that seek to:

  • Enable earlier stage capital solutions
  • Foster entrepreneurial ecosystems
  • Promote and establish impact investing industry infrastructure
  • Develop market ecosystems for specific sectors
  • Form leadership and networking platforms for common actions

All proposals must demonstrate a nexus between the project and the furtherance of charitable goals such as research, promoting sustainable development in underdeveloped areas, or protecting the environment.
A  priority  will  be  placed  on  proposals  from  organizations  based  in  Africa.
We encourage organizations with  headquarters outside of Africa to develop strong  partnerships with  organizations based locally as part of their proposals.

A priority will be placed on geographic diversity within Africa, so it is important for proposals to specify the target countries/regions.

Africa Organizations Grant Amount

The IEIF will support approximately 7-8 proposals; interested organizations may apply to the fund for grants for up to 12 months with a maximum request of US$100,000, and may participate in more than one grant proposal.

Africa NGOs Grants – Required Documentation

To apply for an IEIF grant, please provide the following documentation and a brief proposal that clearly includes the sections below. Please limit proposals to 5 – 8 pages.
Required Documentation

  • Executive Summary
  • Proposal
  • Proof of legal status of the organization
  • Annual report, mission, objectives, recent activities and future plans of the organization
  • Financial statements (audited if possible)

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Global Impact Investing Network
30 Broad Street
38th Floor
New York, NY 10004
info@thegiin.org
Tel: +1.646.837.7430

  1. AFRICAN WOMEN DEVELOPMENT FUND.

African Women Development Fund Grants: African Women Development Fund (AWDF) is an institutional capacity-building and programme development fund, which aims to help build a culture of learning and partnerships within the African women’s movement.
The African Women Development Fund (AWDF) funds local, national, sub-regional and regional organisations in Africa working towards women’s empowerment.
In addition to awarding grants, the AWDF attempts to strengthen the organisational capacities of its grantees.
The funds work in six thematic areas:
·  Women’s Human Rights.
·  Political Participation.
·  Peace Building.
·  Health, Reproductive Rights.
·  HIV/AIDS.
·  Economic Empowerment.
Who can Apply?
·  Organisations can be local, national, sub-regional or regional African women’s organisations, from any part of Africa.
·  Local women’s organisations should send in the names of two referees, one of who should be a member of a women’s organisation that operates nationally.
Grants: Organisations can apply for grants of up to $40,000.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
The African  Women’s Development Fund, 25 Yiyiwa St Abelenkpe, Accra, P.M.B CT 89 Cantonments Accra, Ghana. Email: awdf[at]awdf.org or grants[at]awdf.org. Tel: + 233 21 780476 / 7. Fax: +233 21 782502.

  1. AFRICAN WOMEN IN AGRICUTURAL R & D (AWARD)

AWARD – investing in Africa’s future by increasing the talent pool of African women in African research and development.
A two-year fellowship for fast-tracking the careers of African women scientists and professionals is at the heart of AWARD.
Fellows chosen from across sub-Saharan Africa receive opportunities to strengthen their leadership and science capacities, and are paired with senior scientists in their fields who serve as their mentors.
AWARD grew from a highly successful pilot fellowship program conducted by G&D in collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation, USAID and the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Email: AWARD Fellows@cgiar.org

  1. AGA KHAN DEVELOPEMNT  NETWORK – AKDN

Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) is a group of development agencies focusing on health, education, culture, rural development, institution-building and the promotion of economic development.
It is dedicated to improving living conditions and opportunities for the poor,without regard to their faith,origin or gender.
Aga Khan Development Network consists of the following organisations:
Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development – AKFED
·  This is an international development agency dedicated to promoting entrepreneurship and building economically sound enterprises in the developing world.
·  It seeks to create profitable, sustainable enterprises through long-term investments that result in strong equity positions.
·  The companies range from banking to electric power, agricultural processing, hotels, airlines and telecommunications.
Aga Khan Foundation – AKF
·  Focuses on a small number of specific development problems by forming intellectual and financial partnerships with organisations sharing its objectives.
·  Most Foundation grants are made to grassroots organisations testing innovative approaches in the field.
Aga Khan Health Services – AKHS
Provides primary health care and curative medical care in Afghanistan, India, Kenya, Pakistan, and Tanzania.
·  Also provides technical assistance to government in health service delivery in Kenya, Syria and Tajikistan.
Aga Khan Agency for Microfinance -AKAM
·  The underlying objectives is to reduce poverty, diminish the vulnerability of poor populations and alleviate economic and social exclusion.
Aga Khan Planning and Building Services – AKPBS
·  AKPBS works to improve the built environment, particularly housing design and construction, village planning, natural hazard mitigation, environmental sanitation, water supplies, and other living conditions.
·  The organisation achieves these goals through the provision of material, technical assistance and construction management services for rural and urban areas.
Focus Humanitarian Assistance – FOCUS
·  Focus helps people in need reduce their dependence on humanitarian aid and facilitates their transition to sustainable self-reliant, long-term development.
Aga Khan Education Services – AKES
·  Operates schools and advanced educational programmes that provide quality pre-school, primary, secondary, and higher secondary education services to students in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Kenya ,the Kyrgyz Republic, Uganda, Tanzania, and Tajikistan.
Aga Khan Trust for Culture – AKTC
·  Focuses on the physical, social, cultural and economic revitalisation of communities in the Muslim world.
Aga Khan University – AKU
·  Provides higher education and develops research pertinent to Pakistan and the developing world at internationally accepted academic standards.
The Aga Khan fund is active in 16 countries in the developing world: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Kyrgyz Republic, Mali, Mozambique, Pakistan, Senegal, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania and Uganda
Funding Criteria
With few exceptions, the Foundation funds programmes in countries where it has offices and local professional staff to monitor implementation (South and Central Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East).
Limitations
·  Except for buildings that it owns, the foundation does not fund constructions.
·  It cannot make grants to individuals in response to personal needs.
Before developing full proposals, enquiries should be made to the Foundation office in the country where the proposal originates or where the project would be executed.

CONTACT ADDRESS:

  1. AGA KHAN FOUNDATION CANADA – NGO GRANTS.

Aga Khan Foundation Canada is a non-profit international agency that supports social development programs in Asia and Africa .
As a member of the world-wide Aga Khan Development Network, the Foundation works to address the root causes of poverty: finding and sharing “Smart Solutions” that help improve the quality of lifein poor communities.
Our programs focus on four core areas: health, education, rural development and building the capacity of non-governmental organizations.
Gender equity and protecting the environment are integrated into every program.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Aga Khan Foundation Canada
The Delegation of the Ismaili Imamat
199 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Canada, K1N 1K6 Phone: (613) 237-2532
Fax: (613) 567-2532
Toll free number: 1-800-267-2532
Email: info@akfc.ca

  1. AGFUND INTERNATIONAL PRIZE.

AGFUND International Prize is an annual prize awarded by the Arab Gulf Programme for United Nations Development Organizations (AGFUND).
It aims to honour the pioneering development projects in the developing countries and concerned with the support of sustainable human development efforts, targeting the neediest groups in the developing countries, particularly women and children.
The Prize is consisted of a financial reward of US$ 300, 000 in addition to trophies and certificates of recognition.
Its main objectives are;
·  To contribute to the support and funding of programmes and projects in the sector of health, especially for motherhood and childhood, through:
– Projects aiming at raising health awareness
– Primary health care projects
– Environmental health projects
·  To contribute to the support and funding of educational programmes and projects targeting women and children, particularly the disadvantaged groups, through:
– Basic education and preparing of educational curricula
– Establishing and equipping of educational institutions
– Establishing and equipping of vocational training centers
– Research and studies in the domain of education development
– Projects for open universities and distance learning.
·  To participate in the establishment, promotion and development of institutional capacity building of organizations active in the fields of sustainable human development, especially those devoted to women and children.
·  To contribute to the support and funding of developmental projects of special nature, through :
·  Emergency relief assistance for the victims of wars, armed conflicts and natural disasters.
·  Small projects aimed at income generating for less privileged groups.
·  Banks for the poor and micro-credit services.
·  Studies and research aimed at achieving sustainable human development.

CONTACT ADDRESS:

  1. AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPEMNT GRANTS.

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation works to help people lead healthy and productive lives in developing countries.
It focuses on improving people’s health and giving them the chance to lift themselves out of hunger and extreme poverty.
The foundation is working on breaking the cycles of hunger and poverty by providing small farmers with the tools and opportunities to boost their productivity, increase their incomes, and build better lives for themselves and their families.
Foundation’s Agricultural Development initiative aims to help small-scale farmers in developing countries improve their productivity and gain access to markets.

Agricultural development funds are focused in four areas:

  1. Increased farmer productivity – Work to provide poor farmers with access to improved inputs, training, and support networks to help them make better choices and improve their productivity while protecting natural resources.
    2. Links to markets – Seek to link farmers to new and existing markets and provide them with access to information to support their decision-making.
    3. New technologies – From traditional seed breeding to the newest biotechnologies, the partners employ a range of approaches in the search for solutions that will help small farmers.
    4. Data, research, and policy analysis – This is done by supporting data collection, research and policy analysis related to agricultural development. This is critical in evaluating the impact of various approaches, getting accurate information to small farmers and assessing the effects of national and international agriculture policies.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
440 5th Ave N., Seattle, WA 98109 (206) 709-3100 ext.7100

  1. ALLAN & NESTA FERGUSON CHARITABLE TRUST.

The Allan & Nesta Ferguson Charitable Trust was set up to promote their particular interests in education, international friendship and understanding, and the promotion of world peace and development.
Grants are given to charitable organisations involved in projects supporting the interests of the Trust, and also to individual students who are undertaking a gap year or studying for a PhD.
When to Apply:
Applications for either a gap year or PhD grant should be made as soon as possible, either before the beginning of the proposed gap year or at least three months before the start of the final year of a PhD course.
How to Apply:
·  The Trust prefer where possible that you complete and submit the on-line application form on this website and email it to us.
Alternatively you may download and print out the application form, complete it and send it by letter post.
·  Please do not extend the length of the forms, or add any attachments. Applications MUST NOT exceed 3 pages. Please use text size 12.
·  If you are applying for more than one project, please use a separate form for each project.
All applications by email will be acknowledged and a decision will usually be given within three months of the application.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

 

16.ALLEN FOUNDATION INC. GRANTS.

The Allen Foundation makes grants to projects that primarily benefit programs for human nutrition in the areas of health, education, training, and research.
The policies and priorities of the Allen Foundation are:
·  To make grants to fund relevant nutritional research;
·  To support programs for the education and training of mothers during pregnancy and after the birth of their children;
·  To assist in the training of persons to work as educators and 21 demonstrators of good nutritional practices; and
·  To encourage the dissemination of information regarding healthful nutritional practices and habits.
Eligibility:
In order to be considered for an Allen Foundation grant, you must be a non-profit organization.
Academic research under an Allen Foundation grant must be conducted under the leadership of a principal investigator who is a full-time regular faculty member with tenure or on tenure tract.
Only online submissions of grant proposals will be considered for possible funding.

CONTACT ADDRESS.

 

  1. ALLIANCE OF CIVILIZATIONS YOUTH SOLIDARITY FUND.

Alliance of Civilizations Youth Solidarity Fund: The YSF provides seed funding to outstanding youth-led initiatives that promote long-term constructive relationships between people from diverse cultural and religious backgrounds.
The Fund links small scale and local work to larger movements for social and global change.
It supports the development of young peoples’ organizations and other means for their work to have an even broader and deeper impact and to be expanded.
This year, there are two levels of funding available:
·  Small grants: Community or local-level projects needing funding of up to US$20,000.
·  Large grants: National or regional-level projects needing funding of up to US$30,000.
A Youth Selection Committee will identify projects that are deemed to be the most meritorious under each category of funding.
Eligible youth organizations from around the world are invited to submit projects.
Eligibility:
Applying organizations need to fulfill each and every one of the following criteria to be deemed eligible:
·  Be a membership‐based youth organization (youth‐led or primarily youth‐serving) or a network composed of several youth‐led organizations;
·  Be a non‐governmental organization (with the exception of national youth councils)registered in the country of operation as a charity, trust, foundation or association;
·  Be operational for a minimum of 2 years with funding base and project implementation;
·  Have a democratic governance structure, leadership nomination and consultative processes in formulating priorities and policies with members;
·  Have the ability to demonstrate proper and consistent monitoring, evaluation and recordkeeping of their activities, including projects evaluation reports and financial accounts;
·  Have a gender perspective/balance reflected in their staff, membership and activities;
·  Have no adherence to or affiliations with violent ideologies or antagonism against any particular country, culture, religion or belief system, ethnic group, sex, etc.
·  Did not receive funding under the Pilot Phase of the Youth Solidarity Fund as a youth organization can receive funding under the Youth Solidarity Fund only once.
CONTACT ADDRESS:

 

  1. AMERICAN JEWISH WORLD SERVICE – AJWS

American Jewish World Service – AJWS: American Jewish World Service (AJWS) is an international development organization dedicated to alleviating poverty, hunger and disease among the people of the developing world regardless of race, religion or nationality.
American Jewish World Service (AJWS) grants from $3,000-$30,000 per year and preference is given to small organizations with annual budgets lower than $300,000.
The grants are awarded for a year at a time and they may be renewed annually.
American Jewish World Service (AJWS) only funds the following countries in Africa:
Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
The American Jewish World Service funds non-governmental (NGOs) and community-based organizations in Africa working in the following thematic areas:
1. Sustainable Livelihoods and Sustainable Development
This include:
·  Sustainable Agriculture and Biodiversity
·  Food Security
·  Land and Resource Rights
·  Economic Opportunities
·  Slum and Urban Development
2. Community Health
This include:
·  HIV/AIDS care and support
·  Anti-stigma efforts, and advocacy
·  Disease prevention and control through health education and nutrition with a focus on HIV/AIDS
·  TB and Malaria
·  Reproductive Health and Rights
·  Maternal and Child Health and Rights
·  Efforts to strengthen community and government health systems
·  Violence Prevention
3. Education for All
Facilitating access to quality primary and secondary education for all.
This include:
·  Access to government and non-formal education with a focus on retention for girls and orphans and vulnerable children.
·  Improving the quality of education, including teacher training, curriculum development and fostering community engagement and oversight of schools.
·  Vocational and literacy training for youth and adults Early Childhood Development.
4. Community Engagement in Conflict and Emergencies
Supporting local organizations affected by disasters and conflict to move to move toward peace and development.
5. Community Voice: Civic and Political Participation
AJWS funds policy advocacy and community mobilization efforts that are led by community-based organizations working for:
·  Women’s Rights
·  Indigenous Rights
·  Religious and Ethnic Minority Rights
·  Sexual Minority Rights
·  Refugee and Internally Displaced Persons Rights
·  Worker Rights
·  Youth and Adolescent Participation
AJWS does not fund:
·  Proselytizing activities
·  Individuals
·  Orphanages
·  Political parties
·  Hospitals
·  Private enterprises
·  Government structures

CONTACT ADDRESS:
American Jewish World Service
45 West 36th Street
New York, NY 10018
Tel: 212.792.2900
800.889.7146Fax: 212.792.2930
Email: ajws@ajws.org

  1. ARK FOUNDATION OF AFRICA – AFA

AFA is dedicated to enhancing the well-being of children and families in East Africa, whose lives have been devastated by war, poverty and HIV/AIDS.
The Foundation grants supports its One Stop Center, which provides cost-free secondary schooling to impoverished children who have been forced to drop out of school due to poverty.
AFA focuses on Africa’s potential for growth, rebirth and the possibility for children, youth and communities to thrive and works with other national and international groups to promote the rights of children and families.
AFA has supported children and families in the most underserved communities in Eastern Africa and provided hundreds of villagers and communities with technical skills that assist with providing sustainable solutions to community development.
Ark Foundation of Africa Vision is:
·  To create opportunities for vulnerable children from marginalized and underserved communities.
·  To give children equal access to educational opportunities and other basic services.
·  To invest in human development by empowering people to understand their challenges and priorities.
·  To provide training that assist people in finding practical, realistic and sustainable solutions to solve their problems.
The Foundation and its program partners provide a range of comprehensive services including:
·  Family counselling
·  Financial support for grandparents caring for orphans and other vulnerable children
·  Health education
·  Nutrition information
·  Food assistance
·  Academic support and job training among others

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
ARK Foundation of Africa (ARK)
1002 Maryland Ave, NE
Washington, DC 20002

Tel. 202-832-5420 or 202-820-7186
Email info@arkafrica.org

AFRICA CONTACTS
Tanzania P. O. Box 7704 Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: +255-657-316180Kenya P. O. Box 4978, Nairobi, Kenya
Hary Thui Rd
Tel: +254-20-222-3588
Fax: +254-20-514-7351Uganda
Plot # 56 Nakasero Rd # 314
P. O. Box 1717 Kampala, Uganda
Tel: +256-704-789-583
Congo
P. O Box 76 Brazzaville, Congo
Tel: +242-728-333-875Ghana
Martin Rd, #41
P. O. Box 1732 Accra, Ghana
Tel: +257-209-237-960Burundi
P. O. Box 2523, Bujumbura, Burundi
Tel: +257-7234-899

 

  1. ASHDEN AWARDS FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY.

The International Awards are designed for schemes in the developing world.
Award winners use local renewable energy to reduce poverty, improve people’s health, wellbeing and economic prospects, and at the same time tackle climate change and other environmental threats, notably deforestation.
There are five international awards in total, each with a first prize of £30,000 and a second prize of £10,000.
Prizes will be awarded for schemes which address at least one of the following areas:
1. Food security
2. Health and welfare
3. Light
4. Education
5. Enterprise
One of the five awards will take the form of a special African Award, reserved specifically for an outstanding scheme from that continent.
This Award was introduced in recognition of the particular challenges which climate change and poverty play in threatening the future of Africa, and the vital contribution which local renewable energy can make in tackling both.
Past winners are the Kigali Institute of Science and Technology (Rwanda) for using biogas systems to improve sanitation and supply cooking fuel in large institutions, and the Mwanza Rural Housing Programme (Tanzania) for developing small businesses which produce high-quality bricks fired using agricultural waste.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Telephone
+44 (0)20 7410 7023
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Media enquiries
Julia Hawkins
+44 (0)20 7630 2903
julia.hawkins@ashden.org

  1. AUTOBLOGGREEN GRANT.

The California Air Resources Board approved $700,000 in grants for demonstration projects to evaluate clean air technology.
Advanced Transit Dynamics, Eaton and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District will each receive over $200,000 for projects.
Eaton will build a package delivery van using a hydraulic series hybrid system it has developed.
Similar systems have also been developed and tested by several other companies. UPS has been running several series hybrid vans for more than two years.
Advanced Transit Dynamics will show an active aerodynamic system installed on a class 8 tractor trailer designed to minimize drag.
The Sacramento project will use digester gases to consume some of the emissions from a stationary engine fueled by biogas.
Companies getting the grants must provide matching funds for at least half the cost of the project with at least 10 percent coming from the grant recipient.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:

  1. AWARD FOR HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDER.

Award for Human Rights Defenders: The Front Line Award for Human Rights Defenders at Risk is granted annually to one human rights defender who has made an exceptional contribution to defending the rights of others in their country – often at great personal risk to themselves.
In addition to giving publicity to the work of the winner, Front Line hopes that the publicity will act as an additional form of individual protection to the human rights defender in the future and that the programme of high level political meetings will enable the winner to build up a network of useful contacts for future advocacy.
The Award consists of a cash prize of €15,000 – a personal honorarium of €5,000 and a contribution of €10,000 to the work of the recipient’s organisation.
Nominations should give details of the human rights defender’s work, the risks or negative consequences experienced as a result of this work, why you think he/she should receive the award and how he/she might benefit from it.
Nominations must be supported by two referees who can attest to the nominees work, their integrity and their commitment to non-violent means.
Individual nominees may not be a leading member of a political party and must be currently active in human rights work (the Front Line Award is not intended to recognise a historical or posthumous contribution.) Self nomination is not permitted.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Human Rights Defenders
Head Office
Second Floor
Grattan House
Temple Road
Blackrock
Co. Dublin
Ireland
Tel: +353 (0)1 212 3750 (See also Emergency Hotline Number below)
Fax: +353 (0)1 212 1001
E-mail: info@frontlinedefenders.org

 

  1. AWARDS CREATIVE WOMEN AND WOMENS GROUPS.

Awards Creative Women and Women’s Groups: WWSF (Women’s World Summit Foundation) invites nominations to award prizes to women and women’s groups around world.
The nominees for the prizes should be those women who have contributed towards the improvement of the quality of life of rural communities by applying exceptional creativity, commitment and courage.
“The Prize aims to draw international attention to laureates’ contributions to sustainable development, household food security and peace, thus generating recognition and support for their projects. While rural women are vital in providing examples of sound practice in their communities, they still do not have full access to tools needed for development, such as education, credit, land rights and participation in decision making. By highlighting and awarding creative development models, innovations and experiences enhancing the quality of rural life, WWSF participates in addressing the eradication of rural poverty, gender mainstreaming and women’s empowerment.”
Nearly 20 prizes are distributed to winners and each of the prizes carries a cash award of $1000. In addition to this, one women’s organization from Africa receives a cash donation of $3000.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Women’s World Summit Foundation – WWSF
P.O. Box 143, 1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland
Tel: (+41 22) 738 66 19 Fax: (+41 22) 738 82 48
email:
info@ woman.ch


  1. BAXTER INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The Baxter International Foundation offers grants to NGOs working to provide accessibility and affordability of healthcare services to disadvantaged communities around the world.
NGOs that are recommended by a Baxter employee or its local facility will be given strong preference.
NGOs need to understand Foundation priorities, besides following the application procedures carefully while submitting the proposal.
Although proposals are accepted round the year, there are quarterly deadlines.

 CONTACT ADDRESS:
Corporate address:
One Baxter Parkway
Deerfield, IL 60015-4625

Switchboard
Phone: 224-948-2000 Products and Services

United States
Phone: 800-422-9837 (800-4Baxter)
Fax: 800-568-5020

International
Phone: +1-224-948-1812
Fax: +1-224-948-1813

 

  1. BBC WORLD CHALLENGE COMPETITION.

BBC World Challenge for Grassroots Projects: BBC World News and Newsweek in association with Shell have launched the World Challenge competition to identify and award projects or small businesses from around the world that have shown enterprise and innovation at a grassroots-level.
The World Challenge is organized annually.
It is currently seeking nominations for innovative projects or ideas that demonstrate an entrepreneurial spirit working for the benefit of the community whilst adopting a responsible approach.
The winner of the challenge will receive a grant of US $20,000 and the second and their finalist will receive a grant of US $10,000.
The grants can be used by the winners for their own use and furtherance of their enterprise only.
In addition to this, the winners will also have the opportunity to attend the ceremony to receive the grants.
This ceremony will be held in the Netherlands and it will be filmed and telecast on the BBC World News channel.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Email: info@theworldchallenge.co.uk

 

  1. BENARD VAN LEER FOUNDATION.

The Bernard van Leer Foundation funds and shares knowledge about work in early childhood development.
The Foundation’s mission is to develop and support programmes that create significant positive change for children up to the age of eight years growing up in circumstances of social and economic disadvantage.
BvLF’s vision is one of a world where, in spite of such circumstances, young children reach their full potential.
For children’s human potential to be to realised, they need nurture that is physical, social, emotional, intellectual, cultural and spiritual – and a belief that the most appropriate care for young children comes from their parents, families and communities.
BvLF currently support about 140 major projects and focus their grantmaking on 21 countries including Africa, Asia, Europe and America.
Bernard van Leer Foundation considers proposal only if it addresses the three issues(Care, Transitions and Diversity).
The African countries include;
·  Kenya – Care, Transitions
·  South Africa – Care, Diversity
·  Tanzania – Transitions
·  Uganda – Care, Transitions
·  Zimbabwe – Care
Please note that Bernard van Leer Foundation do not provide grants for the following:
·  Applications for support to individual children
·  Projects that concentrate solely on one aspect of children’s development or learning, such as health care or special educational needs
·  Projects that focus on youth or children older than the age of eight
·  Proposals for the construction and maintenance of buildings, the purchase of equipment and materials, or occasional recreational activities such as holiday camps
·  Requests for scholarships, conferences, media or theatre events
·  General organisational support or requests to cover recurrent costs or deficit.

 CONTACT ADDRESS:
In person
Our visiting address is:
Lange Houtstraat 2
2511 CW The Hague
The Netherlands
(find us on
Google Maps)

By mail
Bernard van Leer Foundation
PO Box 82334
2508 EH The Hague
The Netherlands

By phone
+31 (0)70 331 22 00

By e-mail
info@bvleerf.nl

 

  1. BORLAUNG AWARD FOR FIELD RESEARCH.

The US$10000 Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application:  Endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation, the award will be presented every October in Des Moines, Iowa, by the World Food Prize Foundation.
This award will recognize exceptional, science-based achievement in international agriculture and food production by an individual under 40 who has clearly demonstrated intellectual courage, stamina, and determination in the fight to eliminate global hunger and poverty.
The award will honor an individual who is working closely and directly “in the field” or at the production or processing level with farmers, animal herders, fishers or others in rural communities, in any discipline or enterprise across the entire food production, processing, and distribution chain.
Criteria for the Award

Candidates will be evaluated and selected based on the attributes and accomplishments that reflect those demonstrated by Dr. Borlaug during his work in field research and application, which include:

  • Persistence. Exhibiting Dr. Borlaug’s “never give up” attitude, even in the face of adversity, difficult circumstances, limitation of resources, and/or critique from colleagues.
  • Innovation. Applying Dr. Borlaug’s credo “reach for the stars” in pursuing innovative pathways, methods, and solutions in a quest to provide adequate food and nutrition for the world’s people.
  • Communication. Emulating Dr. Borlaug’s example of understanding local cultures; working effectively in cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary situations; identifying the needs and assets of people in a given community or region; and connecting with a diverse array of stakeholders.
  • Research/Science.  Facilitating positive change through rigorous research methods, techniques, management approaches, and/or strategies that result in increased food production, availability, distribution, and/or better nutrition.
  • Extension. Extending innovative discoveries and technologies in plant science, animal science, and/or food science to underserved farmers and consumers.
  • Education. Providing hands-on science training and education to stakeholders in rural communities, including farm families and agricultural and food production workers.
  • Application. Applying improved technologies and/or management systems to crops and/or animal agriculture for sustainable production, more nutritious food, and a reduction of poverty.
  • Leadership. Demonstrating leadership of other agricultural professionals, field researchers, and/or practitioners working in collaborative programs aimed at reducing hunger and poverty and revitalizing communities.
  • Impact. Increasing the amount of food available through all of the above.  Dr. Borlaug was always about making a difference and “putting more food on the plate.”

Nominee Eligibility:

  •  Nominees must be under the age of 40 (40th birthday not reached before World Food Day, October 16, of the year in which the award is presented).
  • Nominees must be actively working in the discipline, research area, position, or on the project(s) for which they are being recognized. They may be associated with a public or private educational, research or development organization or related entity.
  • Nominees remain eligible for consideration beyond the year of their nomination, at the discretion of the Award Jury, as long as the award criteria and age requirement are met.
  • The award is intended to be presented to one person. In unusual and rare circumstances, another person may share the award for pronounced collaborative efforts and achievement.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:

World Food Prize
666 Grand Avenue Box 1700
Des Moines, IA USA 50309
Tel: (515) 245-3783 Fax: (515) 245-3785
E-mail:
wfp@worldfoodprize.org

 

  1. BUILDING CAPACITY FELLOWSHIP.

Building Capacity Fellowships: Funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Netherlands Fellowship Programme is a wonderful opportunity for NGOs in developing countries to gain skills and build their capacities internationally through training and education.
Mid-career staff working inorganizations in 61 developing countries can apply for this fellowship programme. It provides the following courses for participants:
·  Fellowships for Master’s Degree Programmes
·  Fellowships for Short Courses
·  Fellowships for PhD studies
·  Refresher courses
Since the programmes are aimed at building the capacities of organizations in developing countries, it is important for the applicant to be nominated by his/her organization.
Further eligibility criteria includes that the applicant should be mid-career professional with at least three years of work experience.
There are different deadlines and different durations for different countries to apply for various programmes of the fellowship.

 CONTACT ADDRESS:

Nuffic
Kortenaerkade 11
2518 AX The Hague
The Netherlands
Postal address:
Nuffic
PO Box 29777
2502 LT The Hague
The Netherlands

By phone

Tel: +31 (0)70 – 426 02 60
Fax: +31 (0)70 – 426 03 99

 

 UNITED NATIONS VOLUNTARY FUND ON CONTEMPORARY FORMS OF SLAVERY GRANTS.

The Fund focuses particularly on individuals who suffer from the most severe forms of human rights violations occurring in the context of slavery, as well as the most identifiable contemporary forms of slavery – chattel slavery, debt bondage, human trafficking, serfdom, child labour and servitude, forced labour, and/or forced marriage.
The distinctive value of the Fund is its ability to provide concrete assistance to the victims of contemporary forms of slavery including housing, legal aid, psycho-social support, food, medical care, training and sustainable sources of incomes.
Previous projects undertaken with the Fund’s grants include medical, psychological, education and housing assistance aid for women and girls victims of forced marriages in the Middle East region, vocational training to victims of human trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation in the African region; support to rehabilitation centers for sexually and physically abused street children in the Latin American region, support for children used as jockey camels and projects to identify and release bonded labourers in the agriculture, carpet and construction industries.
The Fund bridges the gaps not addressed by other UN programmes and has a dynamic and integrated approach.

 CONTACT ADDRESS:

 CALL FOR PROPOSALS IN GOOD GOVERNANCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS.

Call for Proposals in Good Governance & Human Rights: The French Embassy in Zimbabwe has issued its call for proposals for NGOs to submit funding requests for projects to be implemented in the country.
Projects in the areas of good governance, defending human rights and protecting vulnerable populations can be proposed for funding support to the French Embassy under this call for proposals.
The requested budget should not amount more than 40.000 US$. A particular attention will be drawn to:
·  The quality of the proposal and coherence with the suggested thematic area.
·  The organization’s capacity to implementing the project.
·  The project relevance according to the needs of beneficiaries (needs assessment and project methodology).
·  The participation and coordination of all stakeholders in the design and the implementation of the project.
·  The degree of innovation of the project.


CONTACT ADDRESS:

3 Princess Drive, Newlands, Harare, Zimbabwe
Tél : + [263] (4) 776 118 ou 776 313 / Fax : 776780


  1. CANADIAN EXECUTIVE SERVICE SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS.

At home and around the world, CESO volunteers, supporters and clients help to build strong independent communities.
Our Mission: To build capacity in governance and economic development through the transfer of knowledge and skills by Volunteer Advisers.
CESO provides advisory and mentorship services to:
·  Businesses
·  Small and medium enterprises
·  Entrepreneurs
·  Aboriginal communities
·  Municipalities and other government bodies
Can CESO help you?
Do you have a business in need of advice and services? Does your community require assistance in financial management, business development and governance? Could your students, business or organization benefit from a temporary or ongoing mentorship?
If so, CESO Volunteer Advisers can provide you with the help needed to achieve the goals you set for your organization.
We’re in the business of promoting economic self-sufficiency and better governance practices.
Our non-profit organization maintains a roster of over 2,700 Volunteer Advisers (VAs), one of the biggest resource banks of management and technical expertise of its kind.
Every year, CESO completes approximately 1,500 assignments, in collaboration with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians, and international clients.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:

Toronto
700 Bay Street,
8th Floor. Box 328
Toronto, ON   M5G 1Z61-800-268-9052
Fax: 416-961-1096
Montreal
1001 Sherbrooke East,
Suite 500
Montreal, QC   H2L 1L31-800-268-9052
514-875-7226
Fax: 514-875-6928
Ottawa
323 Chapel Street,
3rd Floor
Ottawa, ON   K1N 7Z21-800-268-9052
613-288-5731

 

Chief Operating Officer, Head of Public Affairs and Vice-president, National
Janet Lambert
jlambert@ceso-saco.com
Ext. 4113

Vice-president, International services (Asia, Americas and the Caribbean)
Gale Lee
glee@ceso-saco.com
Ext. 4076

Vice-president, International services (Africa and Haiti)
Apollinaire Ihaza
apollinaire@saco-ceso.com
Ext. 5803
Vice-president, Partnerships and Program Development
Sheri Watson
swatson@ceso-saco.com
Ext. 4092
Manager, Recruitment
Jennifer Filson
jfilson@ceso-saco.com
Ext. 4100
Director, Finance
Michelle Ng
mng@ceso-saco.com
Ext. 4079 

 CAPTAIN PLANET FOUNDATION.

The mission of the Captain Planet Foundation is to fund and support hands-on, environmental projects for children and youths.
The Foundation objective is to encourage innovative programs that empower children and youth around the world to work individually and collectively to solve environmental problems in their neighborhoods and communities.
Through environmental education, the Foundation believe that children can achieve a better understanding and appreciation for the world in which they live.
Grant Guidelines: In order to be considered for funding, proposals must:
·  Promote understanding of environmental issues
·  Focus on hands-on involvement
·  Involve children and young adults 6-18
·  Promote interaction and cooperation within the group
·  Help young people develop planning and problem solving skills
·  Include adult supervision
·  Commit to follow-up communication with the Foundation (specific requirements are explained once the grant has been awarded)
Grant Proposals are reviewed over a period of three months from the date of the submission deadline.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Captain Planet Foundation
133 Luckie Street, 2nd Floor | Atlanta, GA 30303
404-522-4270 | 404-522-4204 Fax

 

33.CARITAS AUSTRALIA GRANT.

Caritas-Spes
Caritas-Spes, which means “Love” and “Hope” in Latin, realizes a calling of the Catholic Church to give the material and mental help to the neediest people.
Members of the stuff and volunteers of the organization carry out the Christian service mission (deacony), which is the way the Church represents itself to the world.
Caritas-Spes was founded by the Conference of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Ukraine in May 1995 and was registered by the State Committee on religious issues in September 24, 1996.
The official name is “Caritas-Spes” Religious Mission of Roman Catholic Church in Ukraine.
Since 1999, Caritas-Spes Ukraine is a member of Caritas Internationalis as well as Caritas Europa.
Today Caritas-Spes Ukraine has over 30 centers in 12 regions of Ukraine.
The mission:
Caritas-Spes respects dignity of people and gives help to people, who are in financial or moral-spiritual need, regardless their, social, racial and national belongings.
Being guided by principles of Christian dogmas, Caritas-Spes brings mercy to people in need giving the light of hope.
Values:
Spirituality:
All projects of the organization are directed on the spiritual development of a person.
The welfare should only satisfy necessary requirements.
The spiritual support gives people hope and wakes a desire to change their own lives, helping themselves and opening on possibility of helping one’s neighbour.
Self-respect:
Caritas-Spes believe in wealth of personality and defense of the main human rights.
The society should not ignore unfortunates, but should perceive them as people, who need help.
Equality:
Caritas-Spes helps all, who are unfortunate, regardless, their religion or national background.
Following the equality principle, workers of the organization set an example for the Ukrainian society

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Mailing Address   Kostiolna St. 17, 01001 Kyiv, UKRAINE
Phone/fax   +38 044 278 19 37; +38 044 278 17 84
Fax   +38 044 278 71 71
Website   http://www.caritas-spes.org.ua
Email: caritas-spes@catholic.kiev-ua

 CARNEGIE CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

Field of Interest: Socio-economic: Types of programs:
·  Education with focus on early childhood, urban school reform and higher education.
·  International development;This program seeks to enhance the capacity of selected African countries and public library systems to contribute toward national development
It has three themes;Strengthening selected African universities;Enhancing women’s educational opportunities at African universities;Revitalizing public libraries.
Grant proposals will be entertained only if submitted by mail.
Please do not use e-mail for any proposals or information requests. Only telephone or mail communications will be considered at this time.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

To reach Carnegie Corporation by mail:

Carnegie Corporation of New York
437 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022

To reach Carnegie Corporation by phone or fax:

Phone: (212) 371-3200
Fax: (212) 754-4073

 CHILDRENS INVESTMENT FUND FOUNDATION GRANTS – CIFF.

The Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) seeks to demonstrably improve the lives of children living in poverty in developing countries by achieving large scale and sustainable impact.
The programmes CIFF aim to support are those that can be brought to scale by an organisation with tremendous capacity and experience in managing large initiatives.
Additionally, CIFF looks for innovative programmes designed to fill a critical gap within their particular (development) landscape.
CIFF funds interventions that explicitly ensure that children will secure:
·  Protection from disease for themselves and their family.
·  Long-term access to health, education, and nutrition.
·  Access to essential services within their communities.
Children’s Investment Fund Foundation Portfolio Areas are;
·  Children Affected by HIV/AIDS: CIFF have focused on funding programmes for children made vulnerable, and often orphaned, by HIV/AIDS.
·  Humanitarian Aid: CIFF investments within this portfolio area are intended to ensure that the needs of children living in conflict, refugee or post-conflict situations are met in both planning and response.
·  Sanitation & Hygiene: CIFF focuses on scaling up effective sanitation and hygiene interventions and promoting policy change with particular benefit to children under five.
·  Education: CIFF priorities include promoting programmes that enhance the quality of education in the classroom and community, with a focus on teacher recruitment, training and management.
·  Special Initiatives: This focuses on protecting the well-being of children who are at particular risk from the effects of global climate change.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
7 Clifford Street
London, W1S 2FT
England
Tel: +44 (0) 20 3740 6100
Email: info@ciff.org

 CLINICAL RESEARCH COURSE.

MRM is one of the nation’s leading providers of clinical research education and customized training to leading CROs; Pharmaceutical, Medical Device, and Biotechnology Companies; and Research sites and Universities.
Many companies are currently using MRM’s e-learning courses as a requirement for new employees or ongoing GCP/ICH training.
Since 1999, Medical Research Management Inc. (MRM) has offered the course: “Fundamentals of Clinical Research”, a 140 hour CRA training and education program.
This program is designed for the professional who wants to transition into a CRA position or enter the clinical research industry.
It offers a comprehensive Education and “Hands-On” Training of the clinical research process, the FDA regulations, GCP (Good Clinical Practice) and the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guidelines.
“Fundamentals of Clinical Research” is the only known course that offers all of the following:
·  Extensive Clinical Research Education (see curriculum);
·  2 Weeks of “Hands-On” Training for CRA, and other related professions;
·  Assistance with job placement & resume preparation.
Over 1200 people have successfully completed our program.
Medical Research Management, Inc. has expanded to provide individuals with additional training options via an online learning management system providing flexible and affordable clinical research training via comprehensive training programs, education modules and interactive Webinars.
MRM also offers a number of 2 & 3 day seminars in Florida, Minnesota and Massachusetts.
MRM is available to conduct on-site services for institutions in need of clinical research training.

 COCA – COLA FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The Coca-Cola Foundation Grants: The Coca-Cola Foundation, the philanthropic arm of The Coca-Cola Company, partners with organizations around the globe to help develop and maintain vibrant, sustainable and local communities.
The foundation addresses individual and collective needs across issues of health, education and the environment, as well as supporting subject-matter expert development.
Grants are awarded throughout the year on business plan priorities, tax requirements, legal compliance and approval by the Foundation’s Board of Directors.
Over the past 10 years, the Foundation has contributed more than $155 million in support of education and $164 million in support of community programs and initiatives.
In response to community needs and priorities across the globe, they support initiatives focused on:
·  Water Stewardship (Conservation/Clean Water/Sanitation)
·  Fitness and Active Lifestyles (Physical Activity/Nutrition Education)
·  Sustainable Packaging (Community Recycling/Research & Innovation)
In addition to their global priorities, local support of their operating groups includes Education and HIV/AIDS in Africa.
The Coca-Cola Foundation does not make grant awards to:
·  Individuals
·  Religious organizations or endeavors
·  Political, legislative, lobbying or fraternal organizations
·  Organizations that do not have tax-exempt status
·  Endowment requests
·  In-kind donation requests
·  Monuments or memorials.


  1. COMMON FUNDS FOR COMMODITIES GRANTS.

Common Fund for Commodities Grants: The Netherlands-based Common Fund for Commodities (CFC) has issued a call for proposals to support commodity development activities that benefit the poor in more than hundred countries around the world.
CFC is a membership-based organization comprising of 105 countries and 10 institutional members such as the  European Union (EU), the African Union/African Economic Community (AU/AEC), the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa(COMESA) and most recently, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).
Through financial support, the CFC seeks to support implementation of innovative interventions that target new opportunities in commodity markets leading to commodity based growth, employment generation, increase in household incomes, reduction in poverty, and enhancement of food security.
The intervention should be scalable, commercially viable and financially sustainable and have a measurable positive impact on the stakeholders in commodity value chains.
The objectives of the CFC-supported projects are:

  • Social: Create employment particularly for youth and women, increase household incomes, reduce poverty, and enhance food security.
  • Economic : Enhance production and productivity, achieve higher local value addition; improve competitiveness of producers, producer organisations and small and medium sized industries; support the financial sector development.
  • Building partnerships: Build effective and cost efficient collaboration between producers, industry, governments, civil society organisations and other stakeholders for commodity based development

The CFC supports organisations and enterprises engaged in commodity value chains.
Through financial support, the CFC seeks to promote innovation to encourage established organisations and enterprises to extend their core activities in ways that create additional opportunities for commodities and the stakeholders in the commodity value chains.
The CFC partner organisations can be bilateral and multi-lateral development institutions, cooperatives, producer organisations, small and medium enterprises, processing and trading companies, and local financial institutions
Organizations have to submit an initial application following which on review, full and detailed proposals can be submitted.
The deadline to submit initial proposals is 4 October.

 

CONTACT ADDRESSES:
Telephone: +31-20-5754949
Fax: +31-20-6760231
Postal address:
P.O.Box 74656
1070 BR Amsterdam
The Netherlands
Street address:
Stadhouderskade 55
1072 AB Amsterdam
The Netherlands
General mail address:
managing.director@common-fund.org

 

  1. COMMMONWEALTH FOUNDATIONS CIVIL SOCIETY RESPONSE GRANT.

The Commonwealth Foundation is an inter-governmental organisation, resourced by and reporting to Commonwealth governments, that exists to promote and strengthen civil society’s role in sustainable development, democracy and intercultural learning in the Commonwealth.
The Foundation’s responsive grants are intended to promote co-operation and sharing of skills, knowledge and ideas between developing Commonwealth countries.
They are therefore available primarily for activities that involve the participation of people and organisations from more than one developing Commonwealth country.
In general, grants are given to support participation from Commonwealth countries other than that in which an activity is taking place.
Grants are given for participation in activities such as training courses, workshops, seminars, conferences, cultural festivals, exchanges and study visits.
Preference is given to support regional level activities as opposed to international ones.
Grants can only be made for in-country activities if it can be clearly demonstrated that they relate specifically to one of the Foundation programmes outlined above, that they have impact at the national level, that they involve an aspect of intercultural exchange, and that they are likely to generate learning that can be shared at a Commonwealth level.
The majority of the grants given by the Foundation are under £10,000, with the average grant given being approximately £5,000.
In exceptional cases, the Foundation can award grants of up to £20,000.
Commonwealth Foundation grants may be used towards the costs of supporting participants or resource people in activities, including the cost of airfares, accommodation and subsistence, and towards monitoring and evaluation and reporting of an activity.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Commonwealth Foundation Marlborough House Pall Mall London SW1Y 5HY United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)20 7930 3783 Fax: +44 (0)20 7839 8157 Email:
foundation@commonwealth.int

 

  1. COMMONWEALTH  YOUTH AWARDS.
    The Commonwealth Youth Awards, which encourage and sustain investment in youth-led development, are open for this year’s nominations.
    The awards highlight contribution young people make to achieving development goals.
    Youth workers are encouraged to nominate young people, who are driving innovative projects in any number of areas, including agriculture, small enterprise, skills training, climate change/environment protection, sustainable livelihoods and poverty reduction.
    The Commonwealth Youth Programme (CYP), promotes the awards as an attempt to raise the profile and highlight the contribution of young people who are integrally involved in the process of change and are working side by side with decision-makers for a more secure future.
    The awards also give international, regional and national recognition to the young men and women who are selected.CYP works with 54 Commonwealth member countries through four regional centres based in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and the Pacific.
    There will be four finalists per Commonwealth region with the top entry from each region receiving a regional winner award and the top regional winner receiving the pan-Commonwealth award.Winners are awarded grants to advance the work of their projects and they also liaise closely with the CYP on the best way to use the funding.
    Nominees for the awards should be aged between 15 and 29 years. Applications close on 30 June.Evans Wadongo, a Kenyan, recently won both the pan-Commonwealth and Africa region Commonwealth Youth Awards. He received a £5,000 grant for the charity he founded, ‘Use solar, save lives’. Regional winners for Asia, the Caribbean and the Pacific each won a £3,000 grant.At 19, Mr Wadongo designed a solar-powered lantern using recycled materials.
    Over 27,000 of these lanterns have been produced and distributed across Kenya, providing a safer, cheaper and environmentally friendly lighting alternative to kerosene lamps.
    His programme has expanded to include building regional youth centres, which provide skills training for young people.

 

  1. CONFERENCE FOR TRAINING GRANT – KIRKHOUSE TRUST.

Please note the following before applying for a conference or training grant:
·  The Trust will only approve applications from less developed countries (i.e. Africa, Asia, South America, etc).
·  Citizens of Africa, Asia and South America who are currently studying towards PhDs in Europe, USA and Australasia are eligible to apply if they can provide clear evidence that they will return to their home countries on completion of their studies.
·  The conference topic and the focus for training must be agricultural crop improvement; typically a food crop.
·  The applicant should have secured partial funding from another source.
The Trust will not normally provide all costs, that is, registration or course fees, accommodation and travel costs.
·  Those awarded a conference attendance or training grant cannot apply for another grant for a further four years.
·  All scientists in reciept of a conference attendance or training grant are required to submit a short report to the Trust within two months of their return to their country of residence.
·  Economy class travel should be booked with an airline or reputable travel agent.
The Trust will pay these costs directly to the airline or travel agent by an international bank transfer.
·  If payment of registration and course fees or accommodation costs is approved, the payment will normally be made direct to the agencies concerned.
However, if the applicant has to make these payments, the Trust will reimburse the applicant to the amount approved by the Trustees.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Unit 15, Oxford Industrial Park
Mead Road, Yarnton
Kidlington
Oxfordshire
OX5 1QU
England

Tel: +00 44 1865 845 055
Fax: +00 44 1865 371 278
E-mail: info@kirkhousetrust.org

 

  1. CONSERVATION FOOD AND HEALTH FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The foundation supports special projects and programs of non-profit organizations in three primary fields of interest: conservation, food and health.
Food grants will support efforts to develop or improve access, availability and safety of food for consumption in the Third World.
Areas of interest include projects to:
·  promote sustainable agriculture;
·  offer education and training to small-scale food producers and farmers;
·  control pests and diseases affecting crops of importance to developing countries.
The foundation concentrates its grant making on research, technical assistance and training projects of benefit to the Third World; favors grants for pilot projects and special programs that have potential for replication; prefers to support projects that employ and/or train personnel from the developing world; and favors research concerning problems of importance to the developing world.
Preference will be given to projects, including research projects, in areas that tend to be under-funded. A total of $700,000 is distributed to grantees annually.
The foundation has a two-phased application system composed of a short concept paper, followed by a limited number of full proposals.
This system screens out projects at the concept paper level that appear unlikely to receive final funding.
Full proposals requested have a fair chance of success. Submit 2 copies of a short concept paper, following the foundation’s concept paper application form.
The concept paper should be no longer than 1 typed, double-sided page, plus a preliminary budget of no more than 1 page.
The concept paper must be submitted in English, and the budget information must be translated into US dollars.
Applications are not accepted by fax transmittal or via E-mail, unless prior approval has been given by foundation staff.
·  address fuel and resource problems related to food production and preparation in developing countries;
The geographic focus of the foundation is the developing world. Preference will be given to organizations located in developing countries or to developed country organizations whose activities are of direct and immediate benefit to developing countries.

CONTACT ADDRESS>
Prentice A. Zinn, Administrator
GMA Foundations
77 Summer Street, 8th Floor
Boston, Massachusetts 02110-1006 USA
617-391-3091
pzinn @ gmafoundations . com
skype: prentice.zinn


  1. DELL SOCIAL INNOVATION COMPETITION.

 

Dell Social Innovation Competition: The Dell Social Innovation Competition has been launched jointly by the University of Texas and Dell for college students around the world who want to improve areas of critical human need through innovation.
Providing a vehicle for taking student innovations from idea to reality, Dell’s Social Innovation Competition is a real-world exercise for perfecting your skills in:
·  Project/business plan development
·  Pitching ideas to investors
·  Building resource networks
If you have a groundbreaking idea in mind or if you can mobilize people and resources to affect wide-ranging, scalable social change with your fortitude and personality, then you can submit your idea for the competition.
Issues can cover poverty alleviation/economic development, human rights, peace & security, digital inclusion, global health/AIDS, education, energy/environment/climate change, child/youth development, volunteerism, food/potable water, microfinance, drugs/crime, elections/Government and others.
The team or individual with the most ingenious entrepreneurial idea to change the world wins the grand prize of $50,000 in seed funding to launch or expand their idea.
Competition entries addressing the environment are eligible to win a special $10,000 Tomberg Prize in Environmental Sustainability prize.
Each of the three finalist teams automatically qualify for a spot on the GlobalGiving website, providing the opportunity to secure additional capital and exposure to donors worldwide.


  1. EABL FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The East African Breweries Limited (EABL) Foundation supports applications, which demonstrate the following:
·  Partnerships with community groups and charities rather than individuals
·  Excluded or disadvantaged people who with support can help themselves to transform their own lives
·  Where the EABL involvement can make a significant measurable difference
·  Kick-start funding to get East African Breweries Ltd. businesses and people involved locally
The main areas normally considered being outside the Foundation’s guidelines are:
·  Political or groupings, religious or ethnic groups, individual interests e.g. school fees or hospital bills
·  Those that are primarily associated with persons under the legal drinking age (below 18years)
·  Those that cannot be linked to a credible source, are linked to disrepute and history of problems
·  Do not have clear objectives and transparency
·  Event or donation that is not linked to a financially needy cause
·  Those that do not comply with our self-regulatory marketing code of practice, our business code of conduct and our Community Investment Policy
If you wish to apply, please write to EABL Foundation providing details of the project, how it relates to EABL Foundation focus areas and the amount of funding required.
Use a proposal format and keep it brief and concise, preferably no more than 3 pages.
EABL Foundation’s Focus Area:
1. Water of Life
In reaction to this, EABL Foundation has teamed up with various agencies in the provision of safe, reliable and sustainable water supply.
2. Skills for Life
This initiative enables people and communities to fulfill their potential and improve their life prospects. EABL accorded this focus area unreserved attention by applying a significant investment in the university education of bright but needy students.
3. Environmental conservation
EABL aims to achieve continuous improvement in environmental performance, concentrating our efforts on areas of greatest impact at our manufacturing, distribution points.
EABL environmental policy ensures that all of our facilities are challenged to keep improving their performance in these areas.
4. Special Projects
Emergency incidences that attract national attention and which the Group deems that it would add value to the community if contributions were made to this cause.
The Grants are open to applicants in the East African Region.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:
The EABL Foundation Manager, EABL Foundation, East African Breweries Limited, P.O Box 30161 00100 Nairobi, Tel: +254 020 8644000, Email: eablfoundation[at]eabl.com

 

  1. EDUCATING AFRICAN PAN – AFRICAN AWARDS FOR ENTERPRENEURSHIP IN EDUCATION.

Educating Africa Awards for Entrepreneurship in Education is a competition initiated by Teach A Man To Fish and generously sponsored by a partner organization – Educating Africa.
It continues to reward organizations in Africa that use innovative and entrepreneurial techniques to fill gaps in educational services across the continent.
The competition is open to all organizations based in Africa working in education, from primary through to tertiary, as well as in non-formal and adult education.
As well as a first prize of $10,000 and two runners-up prizes of $5,000, there are 50 awards of $1,000 available for the best entry from every country on the continent.
Entrepreneurship in Education Awards
TeachAManToFish are looking for the very best programs and models for education.
·  They’re entrepreneurial.
·  They’re sustainable.
·  They create impact.
Entry Criteria:
·  Entry is open to all organizations actively carrying out education work in Africa – however preference will be given to those which have been in existence more than two years, are legally registered, and which maintain good financial records of their activities.
·  For an institution to be eligible it must be based in one of the 54 African countries for which prizes are available.
·  Entrants must supply the work contact details of a suitable referee who can confirm that their entry is true and accurate.
Referees must be independent of your organisation and or a government official, qualified professional, or internationally recognised institution.
Education Awards Entry Details
Entrants will be required to briefly describe the background to their program and its success in rising to the challenges of education in Africa.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Email:
info@teachamantofish.org.uk
– Telephone: Outside the UK +44 20 7263 2306
Within the UK 020 7263 2306 or 07890 420 205

 ELIZABETH NEUFFER FELLOWSHIP.

The Elizabeth Neuffer Fellowship provides an opportunity for a woman journalist working in the print, broadcast or Internet media to spend an academic year in a tailored program that combines access to MIT’s Center for International Studies and other Boston-area universities and two media companies, The Boston Globe and The New York Times.
With this flexible structure, the fellow will have opportunities to pursue academic research as well as hone her journalistic skills covering topics related to human rights and social justice.
Depending on her qualifications and interests, the Elizabeth Neuffer Fellow may spend time at The Boston Globe or The New York Times.
The companies will provide access to their networks of U.S. print and broadcast journalists and professional contacts, as well as their Boston, New York, Washington, DC, and United Nations bureaus.
The fellow will also have a key role in the Elizabeth Neuffer Forum on Human Rights and Journalism, a program scheduled each May.
A successful applicant will:
·  Be dedicated to a career in journalism in the print, broadcast or Internet media (freelancers are eligible to apply).
·  Be committed to coverage of human rights and social justice describe how the fellowship will be a transformative experience for her career.
·  Have three or more years of journalism experience.
·  Have excellent written and verbal English skills.

CONTACT ADDRESS:
Email: neuffer[at]iwmf.org.

  1. FAHAMU PAN – AFRICAN FELLOWSHIP (FPAF) PROGRAM

Fahamu Pan-African Fellowship (FPAF) Program: The Fahamu Pan-African Fellowship (FPAF) program is a program that seeks to strengthen community based organisations and social movements across Africa.
The program will identify individual community based activists with qualities of leadership and innovation, and provide them with hands-on work experience, training and development opportunities.
The Fahamu Pan-African Fellowship program provides opportunities for African women and men to enhance their skills, experience and deepen their theoretical and practical understanding of methods for effective advocacy and creating meaningful change.
At the same time the program aims to strengthen community based organisations and movements by implementing the learning of these activists within their movements and organisations.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:

 

  1. FAMILY CARE FOUNDATION GRANTS (FCF)

Family Care Foundation (FCF) provides humanitarian services in developing nations, makes grants, and provides training for grassroots organizations in the Third World, participating in a wide variety of community based initiatives.
The Foundation strives to respond to all people in need regardless of race, religion, national origin or social position.
They cooperate with people and organizations from all cultural, religious and ethnic backgrounds in their efforts to bring relief and hope to those in need.
To qualify as a FCF Project Partner, as part of the MSHSP relief and development network, applicants must first present their projects via a standardized application that is evaluated by foundation staff.
If approved, applicants become a Project Partner of FCF and are eligible to receive funding from FCF for their projects.
The Foundation;
·  Act as in incubator for effective philanthropic ideas and entrepreneurial leadership.
·  Provide both humanitarian services as well as training and technical assistance.
·  Is incorporated with the mission to enhance the quality of life for all members of the global community, especially those who are poor, suffering, or are otherwise disadvantaged.
FCF is set up to make giving internationally easier and more effective, eliminating many of the challenges encountered by those wishing to help deserving causes abroad, by offering:
·  Professional grant-making staff knowledgeable of, and experienced in, overseas work.
·  Due diligence and accountability. FCF will handle all legal and regulatory issues, ensuring that funds arrive safely and are properly used, as well as monitoring grantee effectiveness.
·  Tax deductibility. As a qualified public charity, contributions to FCF are eligible for maximum allowable federal tax deduction.
·  Access to tried and proven organizations on all continents.
·  Qualified and effective projects have been pre-screened and are accountable to FCF, and thus to you, the donor.
·  Low administrational overhead.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Family Care Foundation staff can be reached:
By phone: (619) 468-3191 or (800) 992-2383
By fax: (619) 468-6996
Email:fcf@familycare.org

 

  1. FEED THE CHILDREN.

Feed The Children is a Christian, international, nonprofit relief organization that delivers food, medicine, clothing and other necessities to individuals, children and families who lack these essentials due to famine, war, poverty, or natural disaster.
Feed The Children has provided food, clothing, medical assistance, and educational opportunities to those in need in more than 118 nations around the world.
Through schools, orphanages and church-related programs, Feed The Children also provides financial assistance to orphanages, schools and other charitable groups in these regions.
The key goal is to help families in need move past needing help and into becoming self-sufficient members of their community.
Through long-term, self-help development programs funded by grants and individual donors, thousands of families in countries around the world have increased their ability to be self-sufficient by learning and applying new, marketable skills.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS.

The Director, P.O Box 36, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73101, USA.Tel:1-800-627-4556.

  FEED THE MINDS GRANTS.

Working in partnership worldwide, we fund a wide variety of innovative, indigenous educational projects.
By improving access to knowledge and learning, we help give people the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness.
Feed the Minds supports discrete projects that aim to transform lives in marginalised communities through education, communication and the provision of information to under-resourced people.
Feed the Minds awards grants ranging from £1,000 to £25,000. In the past two years, we have supported projects in more than 30 countries in Africa, Asia, South America and the Eastern Block.
Applications can be submitted for funding for up to three years, up to a maximum of £25,000 per project.
Feed the Minds emphasises the importance of developing indigenous responses to issues and we expect all applications to reflect the involvement of local people in the project design and implementation.
Feed the Minds funds education across the developmental spectrum, as well as culturally relevant teaching in local languages. Feed the Minds also emphasise indigenous creativity and publications written for local audiences.
Feed the Minds support for training is ecumenical and we welcome proposals from all denominations.
Feed the Minds will not support projects that discriminate between people because of religion, sex, race, disability or sexual orientation.
Feed the Minds does not fund projects that advocate allegiance to political parties or regimes. We also do not fund research, tuition fees or capital expenditure projects.

 

CONTACT ADDRESSES.
Park Place,
12 Lawn Lane,
London,
SW8 1UD,
United Kingdom

UK telephone calls


+44 (0)8451 21 21 02

International telephone calls


+44 (0)20 7582 3535

Fax


+44 (0)20 7735 7617

Email: info@feedtheminds.org

 Media and PR UK telephone calls


+44 (0)8451 21 21 02


Media and PR International telephone calls


+44 (0)20 7582 3535

Media and PR Mobile telephone calls


+44 (0) 7500 080 800

Media and PR Fax


+44 (0)20 7735 7617


Media and PR Email


asach@feedtheminds.org
Feed the Minds
Park Place
12 Lawn Lane
London
SW8 1UD
United Kingdom

tel 08451 21 21 02

int’l +44 (0)20 7582 3535


  1. FUNDS TO HELP END VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN.

The UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women is accepting applications from government authorities at the national and local levels, civil society organizations and networks — including non-governmental, women’s and community-based organizations, coalitions and operational research institutions — and UN Country Teams in partnership with governments and civil society organizations.
The Fund is a leading global multi-lateral mechanism supporting national efforts to end one of the most widespread human rights violations in the world. It is administered by the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) on behalf of the UN System.
Who can apply?
·  Government authorities at central/national, sub-national and/or local levels, including National Women’s Machineries and other sectoral Ministries. A government entity may either apply individually or as part of a UNCT proposal, but not both.
·  Civil society organizations and networks, including non-governmental organizations that are legally registered in the country of implementation.
·  Regional/international civil society organizations and networks that have national presence in the country(ies) and/or territory(ies) of implementation. In this case, the proposal must indicate how the proposed interventions will contribute to national capacity development and ownership of national and local organizations in the implementation.
·  Operational research/evaluation institutions specialized in gender equality and gender-based violence.
·  UN Country Teams (UNCTs) are eligible where requested by the government and in partnership with women’s groups, organizations and/or networks, as well as with other civil society organizations
Budget and duration of proposals:
Budget requests should be within the range of a minimum of $300,000 to a maximum of $1 million total for duration of two to three years.
Proposals will be considered for a minimum $100,000 for duration of up to three years for innovative approaches from small civil society organizations, especially grassroots women’s organizations and networks, and those working in conflict and unstable situations.
Applications should be centered on supporting implementation of national and local policies, laws and action plans on ending violence against women.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS:

Headquarters

Street Address
220 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017
Mailing Address
UN Women
405 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017 United States
Tel: +1 646 781-4400
Fax: +1 646 781-4444
Website:
www.unwomen.org

 

  1. GATES VACCINE INNOVATION AWARD.

Gates Vaccine Innovation Award: Nominations are invited from around the globe for Gates Vaccine Innovation Award offered by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
The objective of this award is to recognize and celebrate revolutionary ways children in the poorest parts of the world are immunized.
Each year, foundation recognizes the award winner by providing the winner(s) and, in most cases, an organization that works to advance the improvements or innovations highlighted by the award with a shared $250,000 prize.
The recipient will also be recognized by foundation leadership as well as with a feature on the innovation on the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation website.
Eligibility & Criteria-

  • The Gates Vaccine Innovation Award is open to individuals from any discipline. Candidates from academic institutions, governments, health care facilities, research institutions, non-profit organizations and for-profit companies may be nominated.
  • Nominations must be related to vaccine delivery
  • Nomination forms must be completed in English
  • The three essay questions should be answered within the font and word-limit requirements. 

Nominees will be assessed on three broad criteria

  • Developing country impact – The nominee should have contributed to the prevention, control, or elimination of vaccine-preventable disease through significant improvements in immunization quality and coverage among mothers and children in developing countries. 
  • Innovation and creativity – The nominee should have applied imaginative and pioneering approaches to overcome difficult challenges to immunizing children and achieving impact. Innovation is not the same as invention. Even simple ideas applied in creative ways to overcome real-world challenges can be considered innovative.
  • Scale – The nominee’s innovation should be at scale or suitable to be implemented at scale within the nominee’s country and around the world.

CONTACT ADDRESSES.

  • Offices
  • Main Office
  • 500 Fifth Avenue North
  • Seattle, WA 98102
  • (206) 709-3100
  • info@gatesfoundation.org
  •  
  • East Coast Office
  • PO Box 6176
  • Ben Franklin Station
  • Washington, D.C. 20044
  • (202) 662-8130
  • info@gatesfoundation.org
  •  
  • Europe Office (Mailing Address)
  • 80-100 Victoria Street
  • London
  • SW1E 5JL
  • +44 (0) 207 798 6500
  • info@gatesfoundation.org
  • China Office
  • 011-86-10-8454-7500
  • info@gatesfoundation.org
  • India Office
  • 011-91-11-4713-8800
  • info@gatesfoundation.org  
  • Mailing Address 
  • PO Box 23350
  • Seattle, WA 98102
  •  
  • Media Inquiries
  • (206) 709-3400
  • media@gatesfoundation.org
  • Note: If you are a member of the news media, please use the phone number or email address above to leave a detailed message. Include your name, press affiliation, phone number, questions, and deadline.
  •  
  • Grant Inquiries
  • (206) 709-3140
  • info@gatesfoundation.org
  • Visit our Grant Seekers section for more information.

 

  1. GEF SMALL GRANTS.

The Small Grants programme (SGP) is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) as a corporate programme, implemented by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on behalf of the GEF partnership, and executed by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS).

To date the program funding from the GEF is approximately US$401 million. In addition, the program has raised US$407 million from other partners in cash or in-kind equivalents.

For almost two decades, the Small Grants Programme has been working with communities around the world to combat the most critical environmental problems and has successfully demonstrated that supporting communities in their efforts to achieve more sustainable livelihoods is not only possible, but extremely important in bringing change and achieving global environmental benefits.

With presence in 122 countries and more than 12,000 grants awarded worldwide, SGP supports projects of non-governmental and community-based organizations in developing countries demonstrating that community action can maintain the fine balance between human needs and environmental imperatives.
The main focal areas of the programme are climate change abatement and adaptation, conservation of biodiversity, protection of international waters, reduction of the impact of persistent organic pollutants and prevention of land degradation.

Several different kinds of activities are eligible for funding by SGP:
Community-based assessment and planning (planning grants): Small amounts of grant funds (typically no more than US$2,000) are available to support pre-project participatory assessment and planning activities designed to strengthen community participation in project identification and development.

Pilot demonstration activities: Most funded projects are activities that test and demonstrate the viability of innovative community-level approaches to global environmental problems.

Although most demonstration projects include capacity development components, grants may be awarded for targeted technical assistance and training activities which focus on developing CBO and NGO capacities in the GEF focal areas.

Monitoring and analysis: Grants funds may also be made available to intermediary NGOs and research centers (including universities) to support programme monitoring; to help identify, assess, and document best practices; and to prepare case studies of SGP-supported projects. The use of participatory methods in monitoring and analysis activities is encouraged.

Dissemination, networking, and policy dialogue: In order to leverage SGP project experience, grant funds are available to support dissemination of innovations and best practices, relevant networking activities, and policy dialogue efforts aimed at promoting a supportive policy environment for community-level action in the GEF focal areas.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
National Coordinator
GEF Small Grants Programme
c/o of UNDP
off UN Avenue, Gigiri
P. O. Box 30218-00100
Nairobi
Kenya.

 GEN FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The Gen Foundation Grants: The Gen Foundation is a charitable trust which supports the research and study of Natural Science and the Arts.
The Foundation focuses on biological, chemical, botanical, and food science students/researchers, and exceptional candidates from language, music and art.
However, if an applicant is studying for a course that does not fall under the natural sciences, art, music or languages, but pursuing a module and/or project within the course that focuses on one of these subjects, they would be eligible to apply.
The Gen Foundation considers applicants living in all countries.
Student Grants/Research Grants – Who may apply?
To be eligible for a Gen Foundation grant, an applicant must study and/or research above subjects at Master, PhD level (Post graduate) or higher level.
The Foundation does not support undergraduates, short-term training, conferences, seminars, or thesis writing. Such applications will not be considered.
Applicants should hold a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent.
At the end of their studies, all successful applicants will be required to submit a report to the Trustees.
All potential candidates should be aware that the Gen Foundation grants are one-off, non-renewable awards.
The Gen Foundation Grants – Diversity Policy
The Foundation is committed to providing equal opportunities to all candidates. It is the policy of the Foundation not to discriminate against any candidate, whether it be on the grounds of:
·  Colour, race, nationality, ethnic or national origin;
·  Religion or belief;
·  Sex, marital status or gender reassignment;
·  Sexual orientation;
·  Disability; or
·  Age.
The amount of each grant is based on the merits of each application, and is set at the Trustees’ discretion.
Previous grants have ranged between £500 – £5000

CONTACT ADDRESS.


Tel: +44(0) 20 7495 5564

E-mail:
info@genfoundation.org.uk

45 Old Bond Street
London W1S 4DN
United Kingdom

 

to Friday, 9:00am to 5:00pm (except public holidays)

 

  1. GENDER AND AGRICULTURE/RURAL DEVELOPMENT GRANTS.

A Small Grants Fund is available to address Gender Issues in Information and Communication Technologies for Agricultural and Rural Development in Africa.
The GenARDIS grants will involve a deeper focus on capacity-building, knowledge- sharing and policy outputs.
It aims to sustain and deepen the integration of gender perspectives into rural development and ICT4D initiatives, taking into account developments such as web 2.0 in agriculture and rural development and Free and Open Source Software solutions (FOSS).
GenARDIS proposals can be aimed at:
·  Understanding gender differences in the use of ICTs
·  Promoting ICT use among rural women (sensitisation)
·  Improving rural women’s access to ICTs-
·  Improving the skills and capacities of rural women in using ICTs
·  Increasing the attractiveness of ICTs for rural women by providing relevant content
·  Using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) applications
This is a competitive call for applications for 15 grants of up to 7,000 Euros. Proposals can be submitted in English and French.
Please note that only organizations with institutional and personal capacity to carry out the proposed projects and who are located in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP) countries are eligible for consideration under the GenARDIS programme.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
GenARDIS Small Grants Fund, c/o Association for Progressive Communications (APC), Attention. Jennifer Radloff, P.O BOX 297552109 Africa, Fax: +27 11 726 1692.

 

  1. GEOTOURISM CHALLENGE AWARD.

This collaborative competition is designed to identify and show case innovators, both individuals and organizations, that directly or indirectly promote tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical character of a place,its environment, culture, aesthetics, heritage, and the well-being of its residents.
The competition is open to all types of organizations (charitable,private, or public) from all countries.
Entries must describe how a program or activity is new and different. Projects must be beyond the idea stage and able to prove success on the local,regional, or global level.
The innovation should demonstrate the potential to be successfully replicated in other places and to become self-sustaining.
The three winners will each receive a cash prize of $5,000. Entries must be submitted in English or Spanish.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Email:
connect@changemakers.com, partnerships@changemakers.com,

Ashoka Global Headquarters | Changemakers

1700 North Moore Street, Suite 2000 (20th Floor)
Arlington, VA 22209, USA

 

  1. GLIMMER OF HOPE FOUNDATION.

A Glimmer of Hope Foundation is an international foundation that is having a significant impact on rural communities in Ethiopia and at-risk youth in inner cities.
The foundation has achieved considerable success with its pragmatic, entrepreneurial and heartfelt approach and has been recognized for its cost-effectiveness and compassion in the areas of International and Humanitarian Aid.
Primarily, A Glimmer of Hope is focused on making a sustainable difference in the lives of the rural poor in Ethiopia through its innovative and direct approach to aid and development.
In Ethiopia , the foundation works in small, isolated communities through indigenous self-help organizations which provide:
·  clean, accessible water;
·  schools and classrooms;
·  health care;
·  agricultural support including veterinary clinics and irrigation; and,
·  emergency relief in crisis situations.
Since its launch in 2001, A Glimmer of Hope has helped approximately two million rural Ethiopians to help themselves prompting the former US Ambassador to Ethiopia Tibor Nagy to describe its model as “the most effective approach to private assistance I have seen.”
Recognizing that poverty comes in many forms, the foundation is also committed to ground-breaking grassroots programs for socially excluded young people in London ( United Kingdom ) and Austin ( Texas ).
In those cities, A Glimmer of Hope funds and supports community organizations operating programs that raise self-esteem, offer positive choices and develop life skills.
It has helped tens of thousands of young people since launching it operations in the UK (2001) and Austin (2003).
A Glimmer of Hope’s mission is:
·  To spread love and humanity to beings who suffer unnecessarily,
·  To shine the light of awareness on exclusion and pain, And,
·  To offer A Glimmer of Hope to those who need one.
Its model is one of social investors working with social entrepreneurs to create social profit.
The foundation’s focus on people – and its emphasis on trust – extends to its partners and staff.
Another unique aspect of A Glimmer of Hope’s approach is that 100 percent of donated funds are directed to the partners that are serving its target communities.
This is made possible by the income arising from the foundation’s endowment being used to cover all operating overhead
CONTACT ADDRESS.
media@aglimmerofhope.org

 

  1. GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT AWARDS AND MEDALS COMPETITION.

The Global Development Awards and Medals Competition is an innovative award scheme launched by GDN with generous support from the Ministry of Finance, Government of Japan, and other donors.
Category 1) Japanese Award for Most Innovative Development Project (MIDP):
MIDP is a competitive grant program that provides development practitioners with the opportunity to compete for grants worth US$ 30,000 to help scale up their innovative project.
The grants are awarded to projects and/or non-governmental organizations that are carrying out original and path-breaking work in the development field and meet certain set criteria.
These projects are not theme based. However, the projects need to contribute to sustainable development.
First Prize: US$ 30,000; Second Prize: US$ 5,000
The first prize winner is also eligible to compete under the Japan Social Development Fund for an additional grant of up to US$ 200,000 for their work.
Open to all development projects in Africa, Asia, Commonwealth of Independent States, Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, Pacific Islands, and the transition economies of Eastern Europe and Central Asia.
Category 2) Japanese Award for Outstanding Research on Development (ORD):
ORD is awarded to an organization/researcher(s) whose proposal to conduct research on any one of the three research themes holds the greatest promise for improving our understanding of the relevant development issues and puts forth clear, articulate and well researched policy implications to address these development problems.
First Prize: US$ 30,000; Second Prize: US$ 5,000
Research proposals for this Award will be considered under the following three research themes only:
·  The Interactive Economy and Urban Development
·  Urban Externalities (Contagious Disease, Congestion and Crime) and Urban Poverty
·  The Enabling Environment – Housing, Transportation and Infrastructure
Citizens and permanent residents of developing and transition countries are eligible.
Category 3) Medals for Research on Development (Medals):
Medals are given to researchers for their completed research work that demonstrates academic excellence on the three research themes listed below.
First Prize: US$ 10,000; Second Prize: US$ 5,000
Completed research papers for the Medals will be considered under the following three research themes only:
·  The Interactive Economy and Urban Development
·  Urban Externalities (Contagious Disease, Congestion and Crime) and Urban Poverty
·  The Enabling Environment – Housing, Transportation and Infrastructure
Open to Citizens of developing and transition countries who are temporarily based in a developed country but not for more than five years
Applicant must be less than 45 years old as on 31 January, 2012
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Global Development Network
21 El-Sad El-Aaly Street, Dokki
Giza, Egypt

Tel: (202) 333-18-680
Fax: (202) 333-18-696
Email: connect@gdnet.org

 

  1. GLOBAL FUND FOR COMMUNITY FOUNDATION.

. Grants are aimed at developing the capacities of community foundations as strong and effective vehicles for local philanthropy and local development.
They can be used to support a range of institutional development activities, particularly in the key areas of grantmaking, local fundraising / endowment building, and management, structure and governance.
Eligible activities include:
·  Obtaining external technical assistance from national, regional or, occasionally, international consultants;
·  Internal capacity development in areas such as governance, fundraising, grantmaking, strategic planning, self-assessment, evaluation of impact, etc;
·  Peer exchanges or other national or regional convenings of community foundations and other local philanthropic institutions;
·  International study visits;
·  Development and sharing of innovative community foundation practices or learning tools which can be shared broadly within the local philanthropic sector.
Grant money from the Fund can also be used to leverage local resources or to raise the profile of individual community foundations, but only in as part of a larger, institutional development application.

 

  1. GLOBAL FUND FOR CHILDREN (GFC) GRANTS.
    The Global Fund for Children supports organizations and programs that focus on four specific issues:
    1. Learning
    2. Enterprise
    3. Safety, and
    4. Healthy Minds and Bodies.
    Grants are awarded on an annual basis, with a typical funding relationship of three to six years.
    The grants range from $5,000 to $20,000 per year, growing in size and scope over the course of the funding relationship, and may be used for general or operating support of the grantee partner organization.
    GFC considers each grant an investment in the grantee organization’s mission and programs as well as its institutional growth and development.
    The Global Fund for Children’s mission is to advance the dignity of children and youth around the world and pursues its mission by making small grants to innovative community based organizations working with some of the world’s most vulnerable children and youth.
    The grants have served 304 community-based organizations in 65 countries and more than 1 million children have benefited from the work of The Global Fund for Children.

  1. GLOBAL FUND FOR WOMEN GRANTS.

Global Fund for Women Grants: The Global Fund for Women supports women’s groups that advance the human rights of women and girls by strengthening women’s right groups.
Global Fund provide small, flexible, and timely grants ranging from $500 to $20,000.
The Global Fund for Women offers three types of grants:
1. General Support Grants – Flexible grants that cover general operating and project expenses.
2. Travel and Event Grants – Grants that support members of an organization to attend conferences and events.
3. Organizing Meeting/Event Grants – Grants to support organizations in planning a time-sensitive conference or event.
Global Fund for Women value local expertise and believe that women themselves know best how to determine their needs and propose solutions for lasting change.
The Global Fund supports:
·  Groups of women working together.
·  Organizations that demonstrate a clear commitment to women’s equality and women’s human rights.
·  Organizations that are governed and directed by women.
·  Organizations based outside of the United States.
Global Fund does NOT support:
·  Individuals and Scholarships
·  Organizations that do not have a women’s human rights focus.
·  Organizations headed or managed by men.
·  Organizations whose sole activities are income-generation and/or charity.
·  Organizations based or working primarily in the United States.
·  Organizations in the Global North proposing partnerships in the Global South.
·  Government entities, political parties or election campaigns.
Global Fund is committed to providing support to women’s groups throughout the world in a fair, just way and accept grant proposals in any language and any format.
The applications are accepted throughout the year and grants awarded every three months.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
ssafrica[at]globalfundforwomen.org or Global Fund for Women: 1375 Sutter Street, Suite 400. San Francisco, CA 94109. USA. Tel: (415) 202-7640. Fax: (415) 202-8604.

 

  1. GRANT COMPETITION FOR PEACEBUILDING PROJECTS.

Grant Competition for Peacebuilding Projects: The United States Institute of Peace (USIP) supports peacebuilding projects implemented by nonprofit organizations including educational institutions, research institutions and civil society organizations.
USIP seeks applications from organizations around the world. Even individuals can apply for funding support under this call.
This competition:
·  supports innovative peacebuilding projects involving research, the identification of promising models and effective practices, the development of practitioner resources and tools, the development and delivery of education, training and dialogue programs, and the production of films, radio programs, and other media.
·  funds projects focused on preventing, managing, and resolving violent conflict and promoting post-conflict peacebuilding in settings outside the borders of the U.S. Awards support activities that apply across a broad range of relevant disciplines, skills, and approaches. USIP welcomes proposals of an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary nature.
Topic areas of interest to USIP include, but are not limited to:
·  Conflict analysis and prevention;
·  Mediation and conflict resolution;
·  Postconflict peace and stability operations;
·  Religion and peacemaking;
·  Women and girls in conflict and peacebuilding;
·  Rule of law and transitional justice;
·  Economies and conflict;
·  Social, psychological, and physical impacts of war and conflict;
·  Media and conflict.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
The United States Institute of Peace is located at 2301 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20037, Tel: 202-457-1700, Fax: 202-429-6063. USIP is currently open to guests who have an appointment with a staff member or who are attending a program or a public event.

 

  1. GRANTS FOR INNOVATIVE LIBRARIES.

Grants for Innovative Libraries in developing countries: The Elsevier Foundation supports the efforts of libraries to enhance the quality of life in developing countries by advancing knowledge in science, the social sciences technology and medicine.
The Foundation provides one, two and three year grants to libraries in the developing countries and supporting organizations:
·  Programs to enhance library infrastructure, technology or information services in ways that significantly expand their ability to make STM (scientific/social sciences, technical and medical) information available to those who need it — researchers, clinicians, students, policymakers and the wider public.
·  Programs that expand library information resources in the developing world through digitization or preservation of information that advances science, health, the environment, and indigenous knowledge.
·  Training and education programs for library staff, students or researchers, contributing to sustainable improvements in the library’s capacity to provide STM information in the developing world.
·  Partnerships between libraries in the developing countries and institutions in the developed countries to provide technical assistance or training. Developed country partner organizations include libraries, learned societies, universities, intergovernmental organizations and other non-profit organizations.
Preference will be given to proposals that clearly demonstrate the following;
·  Innovation in improving the use of STM information.
·  A high degree of potential impact on society in the developing worldPrograms that will serve as models for other institutions and countries.
·  Programs that enhance international partnerships or exchange between individuals and institutions.
·  Realistic budgets tied to measurable outcomes.
·  Sustained financial and programmatic viability.
·  Programs that have institutional supports and matching funds.
·  Small-scale programs requesting a smaller amount of funding.
·  Programs leaders or institutes with record of past success.
·  Create and promote collaborative networks across institutions and/or disciplines.
·  A willingness to draw from the expertise and experience of previous grantees.
·  Have specific plans for sustainability beyond the funding period.
·  Embody plans for dissemination beyond the awardee organization of policies, procedures, and “lessons learned” that are developed during the funding period.
Please Note: Requests for hardware will only be considered if they are part of a comprehensive project approach integrating diverse elements such as training or research.
Grants are awarded for specific projects rather than operating support.
Grants for Innovative Libraries – Additional Guidelines
Proposals are welcome for single-year grants in amounts between US$5,000 to US$50,000.

Proposals will be accepted for multi-year programs (up to three years) for a total of $100,000.

For Further Information:

The Elsevier Foundation
360 Park Avenue South
New York, NY 10010
USA
Phone: +1-212-633-3933

New Scholars and Innovative Libraries Programs:

Ylann Schemm
Phone: +31-20-485-2025
foundation@elsevier.com

Nursing Faculty Program:

Chris Capot
Phone: +1 212 633 3164
foundation@elsevier.com

 

  1. GRANTS FOR BUEA CONFERENCE ON MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES.

Without mathematical training, no country is able to harness the full power of scientific research and technological tools to solve the daunting catalogue of internal and trans-border health, energy, development and quality-of-life challenges confronting our globalized society.
Such growing recognition has resulted in efforts towards an African Mathematical Institutes Network (AMI-Net ) as part of NEPAD’s prioritising of science, technology and innovation for African development.
It is in view of the above that the Department of Mathematics at the University of Buea, Cameroon, is organizing its first International Conference on Mathematical Sciences, in May.
Travel grants are available for some students, post docs and Junior faculty. Preference will be given to those giving a talk.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Email: org@bueaconference.com

 

  1. HELP AGE INTERNATIONAL (GRANTS FOR NGOS AND ORGANIZATIONS)

HelpAge International values is a team of committed, diverse and competent people, and strives to offer fair and competitive employment conditions, as well as exciting development opportunities.
Would you like to work in an environment where…
·  you can make a positive difference to the lives of disadvantaged older people: a key, yet undervalued, area of development work.
·  you can grow and learn in different areas, including programmes, advocacy, resource development or support functions, where every person is encouraged to take on wide responsibilities and to share their knowledge across departments and countries.
·  your contribution and initiative are valued within a medium-sized, flexible and friendly organisation, with scope to develop your potential.
·  you can liaise with colleagues in any of our 14 international offices and build long-term relationships with partner organisations across the world.
·  you are encouraged to perform to ambitious standards, but also to maintain the right work-life balance, through flexible working and employee-friendly policies.
HelpAge International is a member of People In Aid, a network of humanitarian and development organisations that promote good practice in the management and support of aid workers.
Do you share our values?
·  Participation Our various stakeholders, especially our staff, can contribute, both by initiating and responding to ideas and decisions that affect them.
·  Empowerment and independence Decision-making is delegated as far as possible, consistent with our overall strategy and ethics.
·  Equality of opportunity The value of each person’s contribution is recognised, and discrimination on any grounds is unacceptable.
·  Innovation We encourage the willingness to experiment and to take the lead in the design and implementation of programmes, research and policy.
·  Aiming to be international We ensure that our work at all levels is informed by different cultural backgrounds and insights.
·  Teamwork We are committed to fostering a collaborative working environment that recognises and supports cooperation with others.
·  Quality and performance We are committed to raising the quality of the work of our staff, affiliates and partners.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
HelpAge International
PO Box 70156
London
WC1A 9GB

Tel: +44 20 7278 7778
Email: info@helpage.org
For all press enquiries, please contact our Media Manager in London, Attila Kulcsar:
Email:
akulcsar@helpage.org
Tel: +44 207 148 7623

 

  1. HEWELET – PACKARD (HP) PHILATHROPY

HP supports non-profit organizations, educational institutions, and communities to help increase job skills and foster entrepreneurial development through innovative use of technology.
Hewlett-Packard provides the following in Africa:
·  Works with local partners who offer training for under- or unemployed youth and very small businesses in under served communities.
·  Gives technology and cash grants to educational institutions and programs in order to encourage innovative teaching and enhance students’ success, particularly in maths, the sciences, and engineering. One of HP’s priorities is to assist educational institutions in under served communities.
·  Provides resources and technology solutions to help increase job skills and foster entrepreneurial development.
·  Gives cash grants and technology solutions to small businesses, charitable organizations, and environmental projects.
HP Philanthropy and Education supports exclusively non-profit accredited institutions (not individuals).
HP focus in three areas:
·  Education
·  Economic Development and
·  Environment.
The grants are competitive and launched at the beginning of each fiscal year (November). Unsolicited requests for grants are not accepted.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

  1. GRANTS FOR HEALTH PROJECTS.

Grants for Health Projects: The UK International Health Links Funding Scheme (IHLFS) provides project grants of up to £15,000 for a period of one year to support health links between developing countries and the UK.
“A Health Link (also known as a Link) is a formalized partnership between a health institution in a developing country and a counterpart in the UK.”
The purpose of a Link is to strengthen health systems and improve health service delivery in both developing and developed countries by allowing for a reciprocal transfer of skills and knowledge between people working in the healthcare sector.”
Activities such as training health staff and enhancing the capacity of health systems in developing countries can be supported under the scheme.
The scheme is supported by DFID and the Department of Health and it is jointly managed by THET and the British Council.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
British Council Customer Service UK
Bridgewater House
58 Whitworth Street
Manchester
M1 6BB
TEL: Customer Service
+44 (0)161 957 7755

EMAIL: enquiries@britishcouncil.org

 

  1. HIV/AIDS TREATMENT AND PREVENTION PROGRAMS GRANT.

The M·A·C AIDS Fund supports men, women and children affected by HIV/AIDS globally.
Typical grant size for program ranges between $5,000 and $25,000 depending on scope of project .
Eligibility: Grants are awarded to non-profit organizations that are directly associated with HIV/AIDS.
The M·A·C AIDS Fund considers four areas of funding as priority –
1. Link Between Poverty and AIDS – Funding for basic needs such as food and housing to those living with HIV/AIDS.
2. Models of Care – Developing hospitals and increasing the number of doctors and nurses in countries that need it the most.
3. Treatment Adherence – Developing peer-based programs to help people adhere to their treatment regimes.
4. Prevention – Programs with a specific focus on high risk populations such as youth or people over 50.
Grant applications are accepted year-round and proposals are reviewed and awarded quarterly (usually March, June, September and December).
The fund encourages organizations to apply in advance of application deadlines.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
macaidsfund[at]maccosmetics.com, M·A·C AIDS Fund, 360 Adelaide Street West, Suite 301, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5V 1R7..

 

  1. HP EDTECH INNOVATORS  AWARD.

The M·A·C AIDS Fund supports men, women and children affected by HIV/AIDS globally.
Typical grant size for program ranges between $5,000 and $25,000 depending on scope of project .
Eligibility: Grants are awarded to non-profit organizations that are directly associated with HIV/AIDS.
The M·A·C AIDS Fund considers four areas of funding as priority –
1. Link Between Poverty and AIDS – Funding for basic needs such as food and housing to those living with HIV/AIDS.
2. Models of Care – Developing hospitals and increasing the number of doctors and nurses in countries that need it the most.
3. Treatment Adherence – Developing peer-based programs to help people adhere to their treatment regimes.
4. Prevention – Programs with a specific focus on high risk populations such as youth or people over 50.
Grant applications are accepted year-round and proposals are reviewed and awarded quarterly (usually March, June, September and December).
The fund encourages organizations to apply in advance of application deadlines.

  1. HUMAN RIGHTS PRIZE.

Human Rights Prize: The French Republic’s Human Rights Prize, “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity” presented by the Prime Minister of the French government, is now open to applications.
This prize, created in 1988, is awarded for individual or collective action on the ground, irrespective of nationality or borders, undertaken in France or abroad.
Non-governmental organizations, irrespective of nationality or borders, should present a field mission or project undertaken in France or abroad concerning one of two themes.
Theme 1: Poverty, impoverishment and human rights in a financial and economic crisis.
Theme 2: New information and communication technologies (NICT) and human rights.
Five prize winners will share a total award of €75,000 granted by the Prime Minister.
The application form in French must include:
a) an application letter presented and signed by the president or legal representative of the operating NGO; b) an application stating in detail the aim and description of the work undertaken or project submitted. It must include a precise budget (with an equivalent sum shown preferably in euros); c) a presentation of the operating NGO (status, work conducted, etc.); d) address and bank details of the NGO.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

Head office address

R.G. Casey Building
John McEwen Crescent
Barton ACT 0221 Australia

Head office contact numbers

  • Switchboard: +61 2 6261 1111
  • Fax: +61 2 6261 3111

 

Consular Emergency Centre 24 Hour Phone Service:

  • 1300 555 135 within Australia (local call cost) or
  • +61 2 6261 3305 from outside Australia.

 

  1. HUMAN RIGHTS SMALL GRANTS SCHEME.

The Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Human Rights Small Grants Scheme provides Short-term funding for Non-Government Organizations and human rights institutions in developing countries for projects that promote and protect human rights.
Aims of the Human Rights Small Grants Scheme
·  Providing funding for organizations based in developing countries. The small grants are awarded annually for projects that promote and protect human rights in direct and tangible ways.
·  Supporting human rights by funding projects that build the capacity of developing countries to promote and protect human rights.
Eligible organizations:
·  Already involved in promoting and defending human rights
·  Already based in an eligible developing country (Asia, the Pacific, Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa and the Middle East.
·  Have a proven track record in the type of activity it wants funded and experience in the country in which the project will take place in
·  Are preferably non-government, although government bodies are not excluded.
Eligible project activities:
Must achieve one or more of the following objectives;
·  Educating and awareness raising in the area of human rights
·  Promoting democratic principles
·  Educating and training human rights workers
·  Promoting international human rights standards, including improved reporting to United Nations (UN) treaty bodies and the Universal Periodic Review
·  Promoting and strengthening national or regional human rights institutions or policies.
Directly benefit marginalised groups (such as people with disability, women, children and youth, people living with HIV/AIDS, prisoners, homeless people, refugees and internally displaced people, Indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities and others)
promote equal opportunities for women and men in line with AusAID’s gender policy.
Where possible, projects should also:
·  Strengthen the applicant organisation’s ability to deliver sustained human rights work after Australian funding has ceased
·  Encourage self-help and self-reliance by involving communities in developing, implementing and managing project activities and by using community structures and systems
·  Strengthen the ability of institutions to meet their obligations and requirements to report on their performance to UN human rights treaty bodies and the Universal Periodic Review.
Applications must include a strategy for identifying the project as an Australian Government-supported initiative.
Applications for joint or partial funding of a larger project with other contributors will be accepted.
Applications for funding project activities that have previously received an HRSGS grant will be considered.
New funds will not be released until previous HRSGS funding has been acquitted.
Applications must be for projects that adhere to the following Australian Government policies
Project activities not eligible for funding:
·  Projects determined reasonably to be contrary to Australia’s interests
·  Projects that support independence movements
·  Evangelism or missionary outreach activities
·  Political campaign activities
·  Projects or activities that create dependency
·  Emergency relief activities
·  Recurrent costs, unless the organisation demonstrates in its application how it will take over these costs
·  Retrospective activities
·  Activities that already receive significant funding through other Australian Government programs.
Amount and duration of funding:
·  Proposed projects should be for between A$20,000 and A$100,000.
·  Projects should preferably be of a one-year duration.
·  Projects of up to A$150,000 over two years will be considered.
·  Funding will not be provided for travel expenses exceeding 20 per cent of total project costs, or for the provision of equipment, freight or buildings, where each exceeds 20 per cent of the total project costs.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

Department of
Foreign Affairs and Trade

R.G. Casey Building
John McEwen Crescent
Barton ACT 0221 Australia

  • Phone: +61 2 6261 1111
  • Fax: +61 2 6261 3111
  • ABN: 47 065 634 525

 

  1. HUMANITARIAN INNOVATION GRANTS.

Humanitarian Innovation Grants: The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) have issued a call for applications for NGOs, entrepreneurs, businesses, academics, local partners and others from around the world for the Humanitarian Innovation Initiative Grants.

The USAID/DFID Humanitarian Innovation Initiative is a special opportunity for applicants to the Development Innovation Ventures (DIV) competition whose proposals address challenges in the humanitarian sector.
Funded with support from DFID, the Initiative is run in collaboration with USAID’s Bureau for Democracy,Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance.

The Initiative will support winners of the DIV competition —including technology, business models, policy practices, and more—that have on-the-ground evidence of their capacity to support humanitarian response and disaster preparedness around the world.
These might include programs that specifically relate to:

  • Reduction of mortality and morbidity and strengthening emergency health initiatives;
  • Protection of vulnerable populations;
  • Prevention and treatment of acute malnutrition;
  • Provision of safe shelter and settlements;
  • Support to communities to recover livelihoods;
  • Enhanced use of data, and monitoring of program performance and impacts; or
  • Improved disaster risk reduction in low-income, high-risk countries.

The Initiative seeks applicants to Stage 2 and Stage 3 of the DIV staged financing model: candidates offering strong evidence of successful pilot implementation may apply for grants of up to $1 million (DIV Stage 2).
Candidates with solutions that have already been successfully tested at significant scale are eligible for grants of up to $15 million (DIV Stage 3).

Select winners of the Humanitarian Innovation Initiative will receive technical assistance from The Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at the Said Business School, Oxford University, for implementation and scale-up activities.
Grants Selection Criteria
Applications will be reviewed according to the DIV selection criteria, and only those eligible for DIV Stage 2 and DIV Stage 3 awards will be supported through this Initiative (DIV Stage 1applicants will be considered in the competition’s general funding pool).

The most competitive applicants will present:

  • A robust case for how their intervention will address an identified humanitarian challenge;
  • Rigorously gathered evidence of effectiveness, cost-efficiency, and impact from pilot-level or greater implementation to justify investment in their expansion;
  • Rigorous monitoring and evaluation plans for collecting evidence that will further build the case for later support;
  •  
  • The business model for their intervention and how it can be both scaled and sustainable.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
telephone information specialists at (202) 712-4810. The number to fax us your question is (202) 216-3524. The agency’s main telephone number is 202-712-0000.ONTACT ADDRESS.

 

  1. IDRC AND DFID CALL FOR CONCEPT NOTES ON CLIMATE CHANGE.

IDRC and DFID Call for Concept Notes on Climate Change Adaptation: The International Development Research Centre (IDRC) in partnership with the Department for International Development (DFID) is funding a new program on climate change adaptation called ‘The Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia’ (CARIAA) which will run until 2019.

The Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative for Africa and Asia (CARIAA) aims to build the resilience of vulnerable populations and their livelihoods in these three hot spots in Africa and Asia by supporting collaborative research to inform adaptation policy and practice.

To reach as many vulnerable poor people as possible, CARIAA will focus on the following three hot spots:

  • Semi-arid regions of Africa and part of South and Central Asia where a large number of people depend on  climate-sensitive livelihoods such as agriculture and pastoralism;
  • Deltas of South Asia and Africa supporting large populations whose livelihoods (e.g.  agriculture and fishing) and place of residence (e.g. urban floodplains, low-lying rural areas) are particularly vulnerable to climate change; and
  • Glacier and snowpack dependent river basins significantly affected by climate change, as for example in the highly populated Himalayan floodplains where water quantity and quality is  likely to be significantly affected by climate change.

The CARIAA program will support three research consortia, one for each hot spot.
For the purposes of CARIAA, a consortium is defined as  a grouping of organizations (“members”) participating in the design and delivery of a common research program on climate change adaptation focused on a specific vulnerability ‘hot spot’

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Head office
Mailing address
PO Box 8500
Ottawa, ON
Canada K1G 3H9

Phone:
Fax:
Email:

Media inquiries:

Library reference desk:
IDRC publications:
Careers:
Fellowships and Awards:
Report website problems:
Street address
150 Kent Street
Ottawa, ON
Canada K1P 0B2

(+1) 613-236-6163
(+1) 613-238-7230
info@idrc.ca

Isabelle Bourgeault-Tassé
(613) 696-2343
ibourgeault-tasse@idrc.ca

reference@idrc.ca
info@idrc.ca
careers@idrc.ca
awards@idrc.ca
website@idrc.ca


Regional offices

Asia Regional Office
208 Jor Bagh, New Delhi 110003, India
Phone: (+91-11) 2461-9411
Fax: (+91-11) 2462-2707
Email:
aro@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/aro

Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean
Avenida Brasil 2655, 11300 Montevideo, Uruguay
Phone: (+598-2) 709-0042
Fax: (+598-2) 708-6776
Email: lacro@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/lacro 

Regional Office for Sub-Saharan Africa
PO Box 62084 00200, Nairobi, Kenya
Street address: Liaison House, 2nd floor
State House Avenue, Nairobi, Kenya
(please address all mail to the IDRC Regional Director)
Phone: (+254- 20) 2713-160/61
Fax: (+254-20) 2711-063
Email: 
rossa@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/rossa

Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa
PO Box 14 Orman, Giza, Cairo, Egypt
Street address: 8 Ahmed Nessim Street, 8th floor
Giza, Cairo, Egypt
Phone: (+202) 336-7051/52/53/54/57
Fax: (+20-2) 336-7056
Email: mero@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/mero 


  1. INTERNATIONAL GRANT COMPETITION.

International Grant Competition: Interested organizations are invited to submit Statements of Interest (SOI) as part of the two-stage competitive process organized by the United States Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons under the International Programs to Combat Trafficking in Persons.
With the aim of improving the response to trafficking in persons in different countries, the Grant Competition solicits SOI or Statements of Interest (a two page summary of the proposed project) from eligible organizations.
Following a competitive review panel, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal that expands on their SOI. These proposals will then be reviewed and considered for funding.
The office is most interested in SOIs for projects that are in the priority countries listed below and that are responsive to the country-specific recommendations listed in the TIP Reports.
Under limited circumstances, the Office may fund projects in countries that are not listed below. A limited number of global and thematic research projects may also be funded.
Africa: Angola, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Gabon, Gambia, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mauritania, Mozambique and Rwanda.
NGOs, PIOs, institutions of higher education, and for-profit organizations worldwide are eligible to apply.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
·  Main address:
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20520

  • Main Switchboard:
    202-647-4000
    TTY:1-800-877-8339 (Federal Relay Service)
  • Hotline for American Travelers:
    1-888-407-4747

 

  1. INTERNATIONAL WOMENS PROGRAMS GRANTS.

The mission of IWP is to use grant-making and programmatic efforts to promote and protect the rights of women and girls in priority areas around the globe where the principles of good governance and respect for the rule of law are absent or destroyed because of conflict.
IWP seeks to promote the advancement of women’s rights and gender equality in law and practice, and the empowerment of women to ensure participation in the democratic processes.
IWP invites proposals from local, national, regional or international organizations which focus on one or more of the following objectives:
·  Reducing discrimination and violence against women
·  Strengthening women’s access to justice
·  Increasing women’s role as decision-makers and leaders
Grant Support:
Organizations can apply for general support grant or support for a specific project. General support grants are intended for organizations which focus one or more of the listed objectives. A general support grant supports unspecified organizational costs.
Preference is given to:
·  Organizations managed and led by women
·  Organizations that have a five-year plus track record and demonstrate sustainability
·  Organizations that forge partnerships with other civil society groups working on similar issues
·  Local/indigenous independent non-governmental organizations or initiatives that link local and international organizations
Organizations can apply for one to three year grants ranging from $25,000 to $200,000.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Open Society Foundations
224 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019
United States

Phone:
1-212-548-0600
Fax:
1-212-548-4600

  1. JOSEPH ROWNTREE CHARITABLE TRUST.

Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust generally funds work under one of the programme headings listed below.
1. Peace
Work that promotes the nonviolent resolution of conflict, including work on the arms trade, the creation of a culture of peace, developing effective peacebuilding measures and supporting the right to conscientious objection to military service.
2. Racial justice
Work which promotes racial justice in all parts of society, including empowering black and minority ethnic people to engage in decision making and policy development, and work which monitors and challenges racism and racial injustice whether relating to colour or culture.
3. Power and responsibility
Work that encourages an appropriate relationship between people and the institutions that affect them; including the promotion of accountability, openness, responsiveness and a respect for human rights across the public and private sectors.
4. Quaker concerns
Work that helps to deepen the spiritual life of the Society of Friends or that develops Quaker responses to problems of our time.
5. South Africa (KwaZulu Natal only)
Work that promotes a just and peaceful South Africa, particularly through the reduction of rural poverty and addressing the problems of violent conflict on all levels of society.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
JRCT
The Garden House
Water End, York YO30 6WQ
Tel: + 44 (0) 1904 627810
Fax: +44 (0) 1904 651990
E-mail protocol: firstname.lastname@jrct.org.uk

 

  1. KOCH FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The Koch Foundation provides funds to eligible Catholic organizations listed in the Official Catholic Directory.
The project must focus on evangelization of the Catholic faith and fall within one of the following five categories:
1. Direct Evangelization
2. Preparation of Evangelists
3. Catholic Schools
4. Mass Media
5. Capital Expenditures
The Foundation typically awards approximately $10-12 million to Catholic non–profit organizations worldwide. Awards are up to $1,000,000.
Process:
·  Applicants must be Catholic organizations as recognized by the Catholic hierarchy of Rome.
·  Funding is provided for one (1) year only. Priority is given to financially-distressed, underdeveloped areas.
·  Eligible applicants must submit a Letter of Request providing a brief description of the project, beginning and ending dates, who will administer the project, the cost, and why it is needed and what the project will accomplish.
·  All requests and supporting documentation must be in English and requested amounts must be in U.S.($) currency.
·  Applicants outside of the United States must identify a fiscal agent within the United States.
·  Requests from Catholic organizations outside of the United States must provide a fiscal agent, listed in the United States Official Catholic Directory, who is willing to accept responsibility in the distribution of funds.
·  Once the Letter of Request has been approved an application will be provided.
·  The application must be completed within 90 days of the date of the Foundation’s application cover letter.
·  All applications are reviewed by the Grants Committee and final decisions are made by the Board of Directors at the annual meeting scheduled the last Saturday in February of the following year.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

 77 LOYOLA FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The Loyola Foundation assists overseas Roman Catholic mission projects, primarily in developing countries (Africa, India, South/Central America, e.t.c.) Requests must be capital in nature (construction, equipment, vehicles) and be self-sustaining upon completion.
The size of the grants made by the Loyola Foundation varies from $1,000 to $25,000. The average grant made by the Foundation is $15,000.
For requests for projects whose cost are in excess of $50,000, applications can not be accepted until at least 75% of the funds needed to complete the project have been secured from other sources.
The Foundation does not accept requests for operating expenses, scholarships, tuitions, endowment funds, travel or meeting costs.
The Foundation does not make grants for continuing subsidies, emergency needs, minor seminaries, or individuals.
The Loyola Foundation does not generally consider grant requests for projects located within the continental United States.
Please note that only one request per Diocese is accepted for consideration in any given year.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
The Loyola Foundation, Inc. 308 C Street N.E. Washington, D.C. 20002-5710.
10335 Democracy Lane
Fairfax, VA 22030
Telephone #: (571) 435-9401
Fax #: (571) 435-9402
info@loyolafoundation.org
www.loyolafoundation.org

  1. MAMA CASH GRANTS.

Mama Cash Grants: Mama Cash wants to change the world and therefore invests in women who, in spite of the dangers, believe in ideals and struggle for justice and change.
Mama Cash supports women’s rights groups and organisations in Africa.
·  General support grants – The grants allows organisations to fulfil the basic conditions for their activities by paying for office costs, staff costs, volunteers and capacity building of the organisation.
·  Project grant – This is for costs directly related to a specific project that the group initiated and organises.
·  Travel grants – The grants are for individuals part of women’s rights organisations to attend trainings, conferences, linking and learning events which will help the organisation to build their knowledge and capacities in the area of their activities and to strengthen their network.
Mama Cash supports women’s groups and organisations around the world that:
·  Promote women’s human rights and advance positive change for women in law, policies and practices
·  Are led by women, and where the majority of staff members are women
·  Have limited access to larger funding sources because they are small, new, or working on issues considered risky or taboo
·  Are strengthening women’s rights in ways that are innovative, groundbreaking, taboobreaking, and pioneering;
·  Apply for amounts within Mama Cash’s funding range: between € 500 and € 20,000 per year.
Criteria: Mama Cash’s grants to women’s rights groups concentrates on five areas: – Bodily integrity – Economic justice – Peace and security -Agency and participation -Art, culture and media.
Only applications that fulfil the criteria and fit in with the policy for the region in question will be considered.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Postal address
Mama Cash
P.O. Box 15686
1001 ND AMSTERDAM
The Netherlands
Visiting address
Eerste Helmersstraat 17-III
1054 CX AMSTERDAM
The Netherlands
T: (+31)20 5158 700
F: (+31)20 5158 799
E: info@mamacash.org
Bank account number: 528 (NL58INGB0000000528) on behalf of Stichting Mama Cash, Amsterdam

If your organisation is based in:  Please use this e-mail address:
Anglophone Africa  anglophoneafrica@mamacash.org
Asia and the Pacific  asiapac@mamacash.org
Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States  europecis@mamacash.org
Francophone Africa  francophoneafrica@mamacash.org
Latin America and the Caribbean  lac@mamacash.org
Middle East and North Africa  mena@mamacash.org

 

  1. MCKNIGHT FOUNDATION GRANTS.

McKnight Foundation work to provide children and families with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary for children to thrive and transition successfully to adulthood.
The Africa Grants Program is a discrete part of the McKnight Foundation’s overall philanthropy.
Its goal is to foster women’s social and economic empowerment in Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.
Africa Grants Program seeks to increase women’s access to skills and economic opportunities that will help them gain greater control over their lives.
In addition, the program tries to help women participate more fully in their households and communities as equal decision-makers.
Requirements:
To be eligible for a grant from the McKnight Foundation, an organization must be classified by the Internal Revenue Service as a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization that is not a private foundation.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Email: dkennedylogan@mcknight.org

 

  1. MONSANTO FUND GRANTS.

The Monsanto Fund works to substantially and meaningfully improve people’s lives around the world.
As the philanthropic arm of Monsanto, they are focused on one goal – strengthening both farming commuities and the communities where they live and work.
Eligible organizations include public charities incorporated in U.S. and working in a foreign country, indigenous public charities, units of government, private schools primarily serving an economically disadvantaged population, and private hospitals primarily serving an economically disadvantaged population.
The Monsanto Fund accepts grant proposals for programs outside of the U.S. in the following areas:
·  Providing basic education support designed to improve education in farming communities around the world, including supporting schools, libraries, science centers, farmer training programs and academic programs that enrich or supplement school programs
·  Meeting critical needs in communities by supporting nonprofit organizations that help with things such as food security, sanitation, access to clean water, public safety and various other local needs
Single grant requests must be for at least US $25,000.
Beyond that requirement, the grant sizes will vary by region.
Each region has an allocation of funding and will decide how many and the maximum size grants they will make in their country.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Monsanto Fund
800 N. Lindbergh Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63167
Tel (+1) 314-694-1000

 

  1. NGOS SMALL GRANTS PROGRAMME.

Small Grants Programme: Through a partnership with the True Colours Trust Small Grants Programme, African Palliative Care Association (APCA) provides funds to organisations including hospices, non-governmental organisations and hospitals to support palliative care activities in Africa.

Since the inception of this programme, various organisations in African countries have been empowered to provide palliative care services for children, to purchase medicines and equipment, and to undertake accredited palliative care training.

The Trustees of the True Colours Trust have set aside the funds for small grants programme to support the development of palliative care across Africa.

All work supported by this programme must adhere to the WHO definition of palliative care.

All funding decisions are made by the Trustees of the True Colours Trust, who meet twice a year to review applications. Applications and approved grants are administered by the APCA.
Funding is primarily for one-off projects, although the Trustees are willing to consider funding for core costs. The size of grants ranges from £500 – £5,000.
Trustees favour support for items which directly improve the patient experience and the standard of palliative care services.
Priority is given to the following, in no particular order:

  • Equipment for patients.
  • Palliative care for children and young people.
  • Palliative care medicines.
  • Capital improvement costs.
  • Increasing access to palliative care in rural areas.
  • Training courses for palliative care service providers held in Africa.

There are two calls for proposals a year, one in February whose deadline is 1st of March  and the second one in August whose deadline is 1st September.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
African Palliative Care Association
P. O. Box 72518
Plot 95, Dr Gibbons Road, Makindye
Kampala, Uganda
Tel: +256 312 264 978
Email:
info@africanpalliativecare.org

 

  1. NIPPON FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The Nippon Foundation is a grant-making organization and works with non-profit organizations, governmental and non-governmental organizations, and international organizations.
The Foundation supports programs around the world, placing a particular emphasis on helping people achieve their basic human needs, and on developing the human resources needed to guide our world to a better future.
Finally, in the area of human resources development, the Foundation gives a large amount of support to the marine and maritime fields-resources shared by everyone.
Grant assistance is made for selected programs and projects which are initiated and conducted by non-profit organizations, non-government organizations, and international organizations worldwide.
The activities of Nippon Foundation are divided into four basic areas:
·  Domestic Social Welfare
·  Domestic Volunteer Support
·  Maritime Development
·  Overseas Cooperative Assistance
Applicant Eligibility:
Applicants for The Nippon Foundation’s overseas grants must be non-profit organizations based outside of Japan.
They can be local, regional or international NGOs/NPOs, and include educational and research institutions.
When to Apply
There is no application deadline as such, and applications can be received throughout the year.
However, it is strongly recommended that applications be submitted at least half a year before the planned start of the project, or whenever the funding will be needed.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
The Nippon Foundation
email :
cc@ps.nippon-foundation.or.jp

 OAK FOUNDATION GRANTS.

Oak Foundation Grants: Oak Foundation is an international philanthropy, commits its resources to address issues of global social and environmental concern, particularly those that have a major impact on the lives of the disadvantaged.
Due dates: proposals and concept notes accepted throughout the year.
Funding Criteria
The Foundation seeks leadership projects that meet the following criteria:
·  Target root causes;
·  Demonstrate solutions that can be adopted by permanent providers and/or by government;
·  Mobilise financial commitment from a range of different sources;
·  Promote collaboration among organisations and funders;
·  Involve the target population in the planning and implementation of the project;
·  Demonstrate good financial and organisational management.
Limitations
Grants will not be awarded for:
·  Religious organisations for religious purposes;
·  Supporting candidates for office;
·  General fund-raising drives or events; or
·  Amounts under US$25,000 (except in special circumstances).
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Oak Foundation, 47 Winter Street- 6th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02108, USA. E-mail: oak[at]oakfnd.org.

  1. ONE AFRICA AWARD.

ONE Africa Award: ONE invites innovative individuals, civil society organizations or advocacy groups based in Africa that demonstrate a commitment to and success in advancing one or more of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to apply for the ONE Africa Award.
This award is designed to honor, celebrate and recognize Africa-driven and African-led efforts that are changing lives, communities, and countries one step at a time.
ONE will honor the awardee at an international conference in Africa in November, and, together with the top four finalists, will be invited to share success stories and lessons learned through The ONE Blog.
The ONE Africa Award seeks to recognize, reward, and advance the exceptional work of an individual or civil society organization based in Africa dedicated to helping Africa achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) at a community, national or regional level.
The ONE Africa Award Recipient will receive an award up to $100,000 to help advance and expand upon its outstanding work within the civil society community in Africa.
Scholarship Application Eligibility Criteria:
The following types of individuals and organizations are eligible to apply for the ONE Africa Award:
·  Individuals or civil society organizations based in Africa that demonstrate a commitment to and success in helping Africans meet one or more of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
·  Applicants may also include advocacy/pressure groups and think tanks engaged in governance activities such as the monitoring of resource flows and/or holding governments accountable to their MDG commitments.

 CONTACT ADDRESS.
South Africa.
Silver Stream Office Park
1st Floor, Main Building
10 Muswell Road
Bryanston, 2194
Johannesburg
+27 11 706 1845

United Kingdom

151 Wardour Street
London
W1F 8WE
+44 (0) 207 434 7550

United States

1400 Eye Street
Suite 600
Washington, DC 20005
+1 202 495 2700

Germany

Luisenstrasse 40
10117 Berlin
+49 30 319 891 570

France

47 rue du Montparnasse
75014 Paris
+33 140 641 7 30

Belgium

3rd floor
Rue d’Idalie 9-13
1050 Brussels
+32 (0)2 300 8940

.

  1. OPPORTUNITY GRANTS FOR US FOUNDATION.

Opportunity Grants for US Education: Opportunity Grants (OG) are small grants to support talented international students who may need financial assistance to take the next steps toward study in the United States at an accredited institution of higher learning.
These grants are available to help cover the upfront costs of seeking higher education in the U.S, and are part of EducationUSA’s broad range of assistance to international students.
What the grants can pay for:
1. Testing fees, including additional score reports, for TOEFL, SAT, GRE and other specialized tests required by U.S institutions.
2. Round-trip transportation and, if necessary, overnight accommodation and meals at testing sites located far from the student’s home.
3. Application fees for U.S. institutions to which the student is applying.
4. International courier fees to ensure the student’s application package reaches U.S institutions.
5. Costs related to applying for the appropriate U.S visa.
6. Round-trip transportation to a U.S Embassy or Consulate and, if necessary, overnight accommodation and meals for student visa applicants.
7. Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) fee.
8. International airfare costs to the U.S institution where the student will begin studies.
9. In-transit allowance.
10. Limited financial aid to supplement assistance offered by an accredited U.S institution of higher learning when the offer falls short of meeting the student’s needs.
Please contact the EducationUSA adviser in your area for details about the OG.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Sharon Witherell
Director, Public Affairs
Tel: +1 212.984.5380
E-mail:
switherell@iie.org
Kavita Mokha
Manager, Public Affairs
Tel: +1 212.984.5360
E-mail:
kmokha@iie.org

 

  1. PEACE STONE FOUNDATION GRANTS.

The Japan-based Peace Stone Foundation is open to receive the grant applications from NGOs seeking support for educational projects for children who cannot afford to go to school.
Peace Stone Foundation Activities:
·  To provide assistance to educational projects for children such as literacy training in developing countries;
·  To assist NGOs and relevant organizations which are active in helping educational programs internationally;
·  Publication of periodicals;
·  Other educational activities
Areas of Coverage (Plan): African countries and others
Qualification for Applicant:
·  The applicant should have been active as a non-profit-making organization for more than 3 consecutive years.
·  The organization should be authorized by the local or central government, or an equivalent body.
·  Total annual project cost (actual project expenditure) should be less than USD 100,000.
·  An organization that can submit application through an associate organization or a supporting group in Japan is preferred.
Eligible Projects Should
·  be educational and targeted for children in developing countries.
·  have continuous aspects, and the follow-up activities are required after the projects completion.
·  be conducted by the applicant firsthand both in planning and implementation.
·  be started and completed between April 1 and March 31.
·  show appropriate and reasonable purpose, budget and expected outcomes…
The maximum amount of a grant is Yen1, 500,000 in Japanese currency.
Interim reports as of the end of June, September and December are required and the final report should be submitted immediately after the completion of the project.
Language:
Applicants could use either English or Japanese in communication.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
The Peace Stone Foundation, Ohashi Building 7F, 7-2, Toranomon 3-chome, Minato-ku Tokyo 105-0001 Japan.

  1. PROGRESSIVE EDUCATION FUND. (PEF)

The Progressive Educational Fund (PEF) is an educational fund established by the African Youth Foundation (AYF) to support disadvantaged youth in Africa.
PEF provides support for up to three years of formal graduate-level study.
Eligibility:
·  Applicants must be resident nationals of an African Country.
·  Schools interested in this scholarship fund should submit maximum 3 students for sponsorship.
Successful candidates will:
·  Have experience in community service or development-related activities.
·  be prepared to pursue a degree or Diploma that will directly enhance their leadership capacity in a practical, policy or academic discipline corresponding to one or more of the Foundation’s areas of endeavour.
·  Present a plan specifying how they will apply their studies to social problems or issues in their own countries.
·  Commit themselves to working on these issues following the sponsorship period.
Candidates are chosen on the basis of their progressive potential and commitment to community or national service, as well as for academic excellence.
Candidates may enrol in first degree or first professional qualification programs and may pursue any academic discipline or field of study that is consistent with the interests and goals of the PEF.
Once selected, Candidates may enrol in an appropriate higher education program in Africa.
PEF selects candidates on the strength of their clearly-stated intention to serve their communities and countries of origin, support the activities of PEF, and expects that they will honour this obligation.
Application process: All applications must be submitted to the AYF office in Germany.
More than one member of the same family cannot be sponsored!
CONTACT ADDRESS.

  1. PROJECT DEVELOPMENT GRANTS.

Project development grants are designed to help scientists from developing countries to formulate technically sound, full-scale research proposals (both research capability strengthening, and research and development (R&D) proposals).
Funds may be used for three purposes:
·  to collect baseline or preparatory data
·  to initiate preliminary research
·  to seek the advice of recognized experts in the preparation of a full-scale research proposal.
Project development grants do not exceed 10 000 US dollars and are not renewable.
Applicants must be nationals of developing countries

CONTACT ADDRESS.

TDR mailing address:

Special Programme for Research & Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR)
World Health Organization
Avenue Appia 20
1211 Geneva 27
SWITZERLAND

General queries

TDRnews@who.int
Fax: +41 22 791 48 54

Press and media requests

Ms Jamie Guth
Communications Manager
Telephone: +41 22 791 1538
Email: guthj@who.int

Grant applications

TDR does not consider ad hoc (or case by case) requests for support. All grants are based on competitive selections in response to specific calls for application within priority areas of the portfolio. Refer to the web site for current open calls.

If you have a question about a specific grant (either advertised on our website or in process) please contact:
Telephone: +41 22 791 38 04
Fax: +41 22 791 48 54
Email: masoudig@who.int

External relations and governing bodies queries

Telephone: +41 22 791 26 66
Fax: +41 22 791 48 54
Email: cozec@who.int

 

  1. PROJECT GRANT – AID TO THE CHURCH IN NEED.

Project Grant:  Aid to the Church in Need supports in excess of 5,000 projects a year, in more than 130 countries around the world.

Grants for Projects – How Aid to the Church in Need can help
Aid to the Church in Need focuses on providing help for the spiritual and pastoral work of the poor and persecuted Church.
We will only consider specific projects that will further the Church’s mission.

These include:

  • Building and repairing seminaries, churches and chapels
  • Providing means of transport for priests and Sisters
  • Supporting catechetical programmes
  • Publishing and distributing Bibles and other Christian literature
  • Broadcasting Christian TV and radio programmes
  • Providing Mass stipends to priests

We are unable to help private individuals with schooling, medical or living expenses. We cannot help with paying off debts already incurred. We do not usually pay open-ended subsidies or general living expenses.
We generally leave the funding of humanitarian and development projects to other charities; if your project is of that nature, please search the internet for charities which specialise in that equally important work.

Project Grants – Who can apply

We will consider applications from anyone in a responsible position on behalf of the Church – bishops, priests, deacons, lay persons and members of religious orders – superiors and provincials, Sisters and Brothers.

If you are applying as a lay person on behalf of your parish, you should include with your application a letter of support from your parish priest.

We can only consider direct applications. If you are applying to Aid to the Church in Need on behalf of a priest with whom you correspond, please show him this information and inform him that he must apply personally.

We feel that it is a priest’s responsibility to apply directly to us; we do not approach him – it would be unfair to raise his hopes, since our funds are limited.
How to Apply for Project Grants

Applications must be made directly to Aid to the Church in Need by the person in charge of the project.

A summary of the plans and budget for the project will be required. Normally, this information can be provided on a few sheets of paper.

If the project involves building work, architects’ plans and costings will be needed.

If the project is the purchase of a vehicle, a quotation from a local supplier will be required.

Owing to the large number of applications received, the Project Department cannot acknowledge receipt of applications.

Applicants are requested to be patient in waiting for a reply.
If the Project Department has to spend time answering enquiries about the progress of applications, it prevents us dealing with the thousands of aid applications the charity receives each year.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS.

CUK Head Office – Sutton, Surrey

Aid to the Church in Need
12-14 Benhill Avenue
Sutton
Surrey
SM1 4DA
Telephone: 020 8642 8668
Office hours: Monday-Friday, 9.00-17.00

Scottish Office – Motherwell

Aid to the Church in Need
Office 2.9
Dalziel Building
7 Scott Street
Motherwell
Lanarkshire
ML1 1PN
Telephone: 01698 337 470
Office hours: Monday-Friday, 9.00-17.00

Walsingham Information Centre

Aid to the Church in Need Walsingham Information Centre
40 High Street
Walsingham
Norfolk
NR22 6AA
Telephone: 01328 821 982

 

  1. RED UMBRELLA FUND.

The Mama Cash Red Umbrella Fund is now open to accepting new proposals.
The Fund exists to mobilize resources to help strengthen and sustain the movement in achieving human rights for sex workers.
It is the first global fund guided by and for sex workers.
We believe that change will only be achieved through strong, collaborative movements of sex workers advocating for their rights, with the support of their allies.
Sex workers themselves are the best positioned to know what is needed for them, and best placed to do something about it.
The Red Umbrella Fund provides funding to sex worker-led organisations and networks that are:

  • Based in any country in the world;
  • Registered or unregistered;
  • Led by women, men and/or trans.

The Red Umbrella Fund prioritizes groups, organisations and networks that:

  • Most strongly contribute to the Red Umbrella Fund’s vision, mission, and strategic priorities.
  • Have an inclusive approach towards more vulnerable or excluded groups within the sex workers’ movement (this may include for example migrant sex worker, trans sex workers, sex workers living with HIV, etc);
  • Are committed to democratic principles and shared leadership;
  • Have annual budgets below 200.000 euros

For the current Call for Applications, the Red Umbrella Fund has a total budget available of 500.000 EURO with which about 25 grants in total will be made.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Mama Cash
P.O. Box 15686
1001 ND AMSTERDAM
The Netherlands
Visiting address
Eerste Helmersstraat 17-III
1054 CX AMSTERDAM
The Netherlands
T: (+31)20 5158 700
F: (+31)20 5158 799
E: info@mamacash.org
Bank account number: 528 (NL58INGB0000000528) on behalf of Stichting Mama Cash, Amsterdam

If your organisation is based in:  Please use this e-mail address:
Anglophone Africa  anglophoneafrica@mamacash.org
Asia and the Pacific  asiapac@mamacash.org
Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States  europecis@mamacash.org
Francophone Africa  francophoneafrica@mamacash.org
Latin America and the Caribbean  lac@mamacash.org
Middle East and North Africa  mena@mamacash.org


  1. REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS IN NUTRITION.

Title: Alive & Thrive: Reducing avoidable death and disability due to sub-optimal infant and young child feeding.
RFP Number: GH-IHSD-2008-01
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation invites letters of inquiry (LOI) from qualified organizations to reduce avoidable death and disability due to sub-optimal infant and young child feeding.
Qualifications:
The foundation recognizes that no single organization will be able to provide comprehensive expertise across the diverse scope of activities proposed.
Therefore, the foundation is seeking fully integrated proposals through partnerships or consortia to complete the proposed program of work.
Institutional arrangements may be among organizations with proven track records in:
1. A lead organization with the ability to coordinate the entire program of work, ensuring technical rigor and timely implementation and reporting on progress and impact.
2. A public affairs organization with a proven track record of success in evidence based, time-limited, campaign-style communications, and demonstrated sophistication in activating support from government, policymakers, and other high level decision-makers.
3. A university and/or other recognized global organization(s) with demonstrated operations research, IYCF monitoring and evaluation capability, and proven track record of success at disseminating results through peer-reviewed publication.
4. Organizations with private sector partnership experience, including marketing and/or social marketing for infant and young child nutrition interventions.
The number of organizations included in the partnerships or consortia formed to respond to this solicitation will not be dictated by this RFP.
However, each application should have demonstrated capability to execute all four program components. Organizations from the developing world are strongly encouraged to apply and to be included as full partners in submitted proposals.
On the basis of review of the LOI, up to three organizations/consortia will be invited to submit a full proposal. Submission of a full proposal will be by invitation only.
The Alive & Thrive program may be allocated up to U.S. $80 million over 5 years, with a program review after 3 years.
If you intend to apply, you are required to send a notice of your intent to apply by March 31.
This will help the foundation gauge interest in this solicitation and inform potential applicants of any modifications or clarifications.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

Main Office
500 Fifth Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 709-3100
info@gatesfoundation.org

East Coast Office
PO Box 6176
Ben Franklin Station
Washington, D.C. 20044
(202) 662-8130
info@gatesfoundation.org

Europe Office (Mailing Address)
80-100 Victoria Street
London
SW1E 5JL
+44 (0) 207 798 6500
info@gatesfoundation.org
China Office
011-86-10-8454-7500
info@gatesfoundation.org
India Office
011-91-11-4713-8800
info@gatesfoundation.org
Mailing Address
PO Box 23350
Seattle, WA 98102

Media Inquiries
(206) 709-3400
media@gatesfoundation.org
Note: If you are a member of the news media, please use the phone number or email address above to leave a detailed message. Include your name, press affiliation, phone number, questions, and deadline.

Grant Inquiries
(206) 709-3140
info@gatesfoundation.org
Visit our Grant Seekers section for more information.
Website
We continually work to improve our website and value your input. Please contact our web team directly with your questions or comments about website functionality.
feedback@gatesfoundation.org

  1. RUFFORD SMALL GRANTS FOR NATURE CONSERVATION.

Rufford Small Grant For Nature Conservation: Rufford Small Grants for


Nature Conservation (RSGs) are aimed at small conservation programmes and pilot projects.
A grant of up to £6,000 available for nature conservation projects.
Who/what is eligible?
·  Individuals or small groups
·  Projects outside the first world
Critical components of the application
·  Impact must be pragmatic, measurable and long lasting
·  The grant must make up the majority of the total budget
·  Funds must be used predominantly in the field
·  The application will not be reviewed unless the application form is filled out in full and three references are submitted
·  The project should generally be approx. 12-18 months duration
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Indonesia – 24-27 January 2014 – Contact:
ratna.dewi97@gmail.com
Rwanda – 7-9 February 2014 – Contact:
karenzilife@gmail.com
Myanmar – 8-10 April 2014 – Contact:
khyne_umar@hotmail.com

 

  1. SASAKAWA PEACE FOUNDATION GRANTS FOR NGOS.

NGOs can seek funding from the Japan-based Sasakawa Peace Foundation for projects related to peace-building, conflict resolution and also globalization issues of inequality, market and dispatity issues etc.
Grant Period:
From 1 to 3 years. The SPF budget year begins April 1, and ends the following March 31.
Regardless of the start date of a project, it should end in March, at which time expenditure and narrative reports of the results should be submitted.
Eligibility:
Nonprofit organizations and Voluntary organizations are eligible to apply for grants. Businesses and individuals are ineligible.
Applications are accepted regardless of nationality.
Application Documents:
Please use the fixed application form “Grant Application Cover Sheet” for the executive summary. Download the fixed form and describe the background of your proposal, project purposes, implementation methods, beneficiaries, expected products and outcomes.
Please add separately your budget plans that include the expected costs and expenses necessary to implement the project; if necessary, please include any related documents. Please post all necessary documents to SPF.
(SPF awards grants annually and proposals are accepted at any time)
Applications cannot be submitted online or by e-mail.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

The Sasakawa Peace Foundation, The Nippon Foundation Building, 4th Floor, Tel: 81-362295430. E-mail: grant[ at ]spf.or.jp.

  1. SAVING LIVES AT BIRTH GRANTS.

Saving Lives at Birth Grants: The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Government of Norway, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Grand Challenges Canada, and the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID) are seeking applications for the Saving Lives at Birth Challenge, which offers seed funding and transition funding for innovative projects.
The Challenge seeks entries on groundbreaking prevention and treatment approaches for pregnant women and newborns in poor, hard-to-reach communities around the time of delivery.
In order to address the problems of maternal deaths, neonatal deaths and stillbirth in low- and middle- income countries especially in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, this Challenge is organized to find innovative solutions based upon scientific, technological and operation breakthroughs.
This Challenge seeks innovative approaches to prevention and treatment across the following three areas.
<>bTechnologies: Inviting bold ideas for science and technology advances that prevent, detect or treat maternal and newborn problems at the time of birth.
Examples include simpler or portable technologies for newborn resuscitation, feeding, warming, and care of preterm and low birthweight newborns, infection management, and prevention and treatment of hypertensive disorders like preeclampsia/eclampsia.
Service Delivery: Bold ideas for new approaches to provide high-quality care at the time of birth.
Examples may include new ways of using information and communication technology (ICT) to improve health and healthcare delivery in rural areas, approaches that bring the benefits of fixed health systems to the community setting, new incentive plans for recruiting and retaining skilled personnel, training programs for community-based or alternative health workers, or better ways to refer and transport sick newborns and mothers with complications.
Demand: Bold ideas for empowering and engaging pregnant women and their families.
Examples may include innovative use of Information and computer technology (ICT) to incentivize individuals to seek care and/or adopt healthy behaviors; or mass communication methods that can change individual and collective behavior to improve outcomes around the time of birth.
Applications are invited from interventions that:
·  Increase access to primary health care for women and newborns by at least 50%;
·  Substantially improve the quality of care as measured by health outcomes; and
·  Lead to improved and sustained healthy behavior.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

 SCHOLAR GRANTS.

Scholar Grants: The Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) and the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) are accepting applications for Grant Proposals to create anenvironment nourished by open discourse and to empower the next generation of scholars with the necessary support to accelerate and advance new and important thinking on economic issues.

Grants will be awarded upto $25,000 – $250,000.

Grants will be awarded primarily to individuals or teams affiliated with academic institutions, think tanks, and other centers of vital research worldwide.

We encourage scholars in economics as well as in related fields such as history, sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science and the physical sciences to submit grant proposals. We welcome submissions on any topic researchers believe is important but would like to particularly encourage explorations on the topics listed below.

Topics covered-
• Fundamentals of Macroeconomics and Macroeconomic Management
• Behavior and the Economy
• Financial Stability
• Political Economy of Income and Wealth Distribution and Inequality Dynamics
• Innovation
Eligibility & Criteria-
• Grants will be awarded primarily to individuals or teams affiliated with academic institutions, think tanks, and other centers of vital research worldwide.
• Scholars in economics as well as in related fields such as history, sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science and the physical sciences can also apply.
The Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) is an organization created to promote changes in economic theory and practice through conferences, research grants, joint ventures with academic and research institutions and othereducation initiatives.

The Institute seeks to create an environment nourished by open discourse and empower the next generation of scholars with the necessary support to accelerate and advance new and important thinking on economic issues.

The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) is an independent, nonpartisan think tank on international governance.

Led by experienced practitioners and distinguished academics, CIGI supports research, forms networks, advances policy debate and generates ideas for multilateral governance improvements.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Eric J. Weiner
Director of Communications and Senior Editor
Institute For New Economic Thinking
Email: ejw@ineteconomics.org
Tel: +1 646-751-4915

Declan Kelly
Communications Specialist
The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)
Email: dkelly@cigionline.org
Tel: +1 519-885-2444 ext. 7356

 SEA WORLD GRANTS FOR ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS.

SeaWorld and Busch Gardens Conservation Fund: The SeaWorld & Busch Gardens Conservation Fund is currently accepting grant proposals from organizations and individuals. The fund has no set minimum or maximum grant amount.
In the past, however, the fund has supported projects ranging from $5,000 to $25,000 for a one-year term.
The fund will consider multi-year proposals, as many worthy conservation and research efforts require multiple years to achieve results and positive impact.
As with all proposals receiving fund support, the project must have broad community/constituency support and be based on legitimate scientific and conservation principals.
While the fund recognizes and supports the critical importance of ex-situ efforts such as endangered species breeding programs and conservation awareness/education, its primary focus is to support conservation efforts directly benefiting wildlife in their native ranges (in-situ).
Grant applications are accepted year-round. The board of directors will meet once a year each spring to review all grant applications and award funds.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
SeaWorld & Busch Gardens Conservation Fund
9205 SouthPark Center Loop
Suite 400
Orlando, FL 32819

 

  1. SIDA CALLS FOR PROPASALS.

SIDA Call for Proposals: The Government of Sweden has decided on a special initiative for democratisation and freedom of expression.
The initiative aims at supporting actors for change, individuals, groups and civil society organisations working for democratisation and freedom of expression.
Sida invites eligible organisations to submit a Concept Note for projects which might be considered under this support mechanism.
The Government now conducts a three-year initiative to support actors for change so as to strengthen democracy and freedom of expression.
This initiative supplements and strengthens the Government‟s other development cooperation for democracy, the rule of law and human rights.
It targets intergovernmental organisations, private individuals, groups or civil society organisations, at local, national, regional and global levels alike, and attends to threats against democracy and freedom of expression, and restrictions on the freedoms and rights of women and men.
All DAC-classified developing countries can apply.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

Stockholm – headquarters

Valhallavägen 199
105 25 Stockholm
SWEDEN
How to get there:
Underground (tunnelbana) to “Karlaplan” (red line)
Bus no 72 or 56, station “Hakberget”.
Phone: +46 8 698 50 00
Fax: + 46 8 20 88 64
E-mail:
sida@sida.se

Visby

Documentation, Administration and Resources
Visiting address: Visborgsallén 4, Visby
Postal address: PO Box 1271, 621 23 Visby, SWEDEN
Phone: +46 8 698 50 00
Fax: +46 8 20 88 64
E-mail:
sida@sida.se

Härnösand

Sida Partnership Forum
Södra Vägen 3d
871 40 Härnösand
SWEDEN
Phone: +46 8 698 50 00
Fax: + 46 8 20 88 64
E-mail:
sida@sida.se

 

  1. SIGHT SAVERS INNOVATION FUNDS.

Sightsavers Innovation Fund: The Sightsavers Innovation Fund is part of a three-year Programme Partnership Arrangement that Sightsavers holds with the UK Government’s Department for International Development.
It is offering £1 million for innovative solutions to development problems.
NGOs, academic institutions, the private sector and disabled people’s organisations can apply and work from this funding to help overcome challenges faced by the eye health and social inclusion sectors in developing countries.
The Fund is calling for innovative approaches which illustrate a way to overcome barriers in the promotion of eye health, inclusive education and social inclusion.
Winning initiatives will receive up to £75,000 each to implement the suggested proposal over 18 months.
The learning from these projects will be shared widely within the development sector as well as being used to inform Sightsavers’ own programmes.
Sightsavers is looking for proposals from a wide range of organisations.
It will consider a maximum of two proposals from any single organisation. An organisation may only submit one application per sector theme.
The review process for applications will follow a two-stage process.
The first review will be an internal review of proposals by Sightsavers innovation challenge team.
The projects identified for the shortlist will be submitted to a second independent panel of expert judges, to ensure a level of objectivity and rigour in the choice of projects.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Sightsavers
Grosvenor Hall
Bolnore Road
Haywards Heath
West Sussex
RH16 4BX
United Kingdom

  1. SCOLL AWARDS FOR SOCIAL ENTERPRENUERSHIP -SCOLL FOUNDATION

The Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship support social entrepreneurs whose work has the potential for large-scale influence on critical challenges of our time: environmental sustainability, health, tolerance and human rights, institutional responsibility, economic and social equity, and peace and security.
The Skoll Awards provide later-stage, or mezzanine, funding, which is generally structured as a $1 million award paid out over three years.
In most cases, the grant is provided for core support to help organizations expand their programs and capacity to deliver long-term, sustainable equilibrium change.
The Skoll Awards are not intended for new or early-stage programs or initiatives.
Programs submitted for consideration should have a track record of no less than three years.
Qualifying organizations will:
·  Be led by a social entrepreneur
·  Have implemented innovative programs that demonstrate effective approaches to critical social and environmental challenges with global implications.
Organizations developing local or regional models for replication on a national or international scale should show that the location where the model is being tested is central to the issue in question.
Examples are peace and security initiatives in conflict regions, biodiversity solutions in species-rich “hot spots,” educational opportunities in inner cities and disease treatments at the source of potential epidemics.
·  Be able to describe a clear, long-term path to creating an equilibrium change
·  Demonstrate proof of concept with measurable outcomes
·  Have a clear, compelling plan for reaching scale
·  Demonstrate a track record of at least three years
·  Have a clear plan for long-term financial and operational sustainability
·  Commit to working with peers and the Skoll Foundation to share learning and communicate success strategies
Awards will be presented publicly at a ceremony at the Skoll World Forum, which occurs at the end of every March in Oxford, England.
Please note that applicants who are not selected must wait 24 months before reapplying.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Skoll Foundation
250 University Ave,
Suite 200
Palo Alto,
CA 94301
USA
Tel: 650 331 1031
Fax:650 331 1033
General Email:
info@skollfoundation.org.
Please be sure to read our
FAQ page before sending an email.

 

  1. SMALL GRANTS FOR WOMEN.

Small Grants for Women: The Virginia Gildersleeve International Fund (VGIF) provides small grants for grassroots projects that empower women and girls in developing countries.
It supports women’s organizations based outside of the United States by providing small grants for an array of community needs up to $7,500 USD.
What VGIF supports:
·  Community development
·  Health and nutritional support
·  Literacy and leadership training
·  Educational seminars and workshops
·  Women’s human rights
·  Organizations that are governed and directed by women.
VGIF does not consider requests for the following:
·  Individual scholarships and tuition
·  Political organizations
·  Religious groups unless the proposed project contributes to the general good of the community
·  The construction of permanent buildings or the purchase of land
·  Salaries for board members and permanent staff but may include stipends/honoraria for external resource people/trainers.
Small Grants for Women Application
All interested applicants must complete a Letter of Intent (LOI). VGIF does not accept unsolicited LOIs or full proposals. The LOI process opens in May.
At that time you will have to create an account, then complete and submit your LOI electronically.
After LOIs are reviewed, your organization may or may not be invited to move forward in our funding process, with the completion of our full application.
·  The Letter of Intent must be submitted by a non-profit, non-political organization.
·  The proposal addresses the empowerment of women and girls and will lead to action and sustainable change in the community.
·  The proposal clearly reflects the participation of the community/target group in its development and design.
·  The project addresses sustainability after VGIF funding with continued involvement in the larger community.
·  Women are well represented in the leadership, staff and management of the organization and project.
·  The organization can demonstrate its ability to manage resources and funding from external sources.
·  The Letter of Intent provides reliable email addresses as well as phone numbers.
·  The proposal must present a true budget with a clear explanation of all items. The budget amount requested from VGIF must not exceed $7,500 USD.
·  Other sponsors or potential funding for this project must be clearly identified.
·  The timeline of activities is realistic and achievable and the project can begin upon the awarding of grants by VGIF in mid-May.
·  VGIF will consider inclusion of an amount, not to exceed 10% of the total grant, for administration of the project to the executing organization in the country where the project is located.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
The Virginia Gildersleeve International Fund, Inc.
11 Broadway, Suite 510, New York, N.Y., U.S.A. 10004
A 501(c)(3) organization incorporated in the State of N.Y., U.S.A. ©2012, VGIF, All rights reserved.

  1. STARS IMPACT AWARDS FOR NGOS.

STARS Impact Awards for NGOs: NGOs working for children in the areas of health, education and protection located in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, South East and East Asia are eligible to participate in the STARS Impact Awards from the STARS Foundation.
These awards “support organisations committed to achieving excellence in the provision of services to disadvantaged children and encourage the replication of effective approaches and practices.”
There are three categories of awards:
·  one in health,
·  one in education
·  one in protection.
The Award;
·  Each of these awards carries an amount of $100,000 and this funding amount remains unrestricted for the recipients.
·  Besides, the recipients also receive “consultancy support tailored to meet the needs of the recipients.”
·  NGOs applying for the awards need to have a legal status in the countries where they are located along with a bank account, board, constitution, annually audited accounts and should have the annual income of the organization more than US $100,000 but less than US $2,000,000.
The criteria for the awards are:
·  Delivery of programmes that positively affect the lives of disadvantaged children and an ability to measure and demonstrate impact
·  Governance and accountability to stakeholders
·  Effective finance and administration
·  Use of technology and ICT to enhance delivery of programmes
·  Innovation and flexibility
·  Networking and collaborating with other organisations
·  Development of staff members and/or volunteers
·  Inclusion and access.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Tel: UK+44 (0)870 334 9000
Email:
info@starsfoundation.org.uk,   asia@starsfoundation.org.ukafrica@starsfoundation.org.uk

  1. STAYING ALIVE FOUNDATION AWARDS.

The Staying Alive Awards supports young people working in the prevention, education and awareness of HIV and AIDS in different countries of the world.
The Foundation is inviting applications from youth-led organizations and young individuals between the age of 15 and 27 years working in HIV and AIDS awareness campaigns around the globe.
The awards aim to support projects for one year, covering practices that provide awareness and prevention of HIV and AIDS, empowering youth leaders in communities and alleviate the stigma and discrimination associated with HIV and AIDS.
There are grants available of up to US $12,000 that will fund the activities of the organizations and individuals.
The awards can also be renewed in the next year’s call for applications.
Applicants need to provide independent references to build credibility of their work.
The awards also provide an opportunity for the winners to highlight their work through the MTV network , which can publicize the projects.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

London

MTV Staying Alive, London MTV Staying Alive Foundation
17-29 Hawley Crescent
London, UK
NW1 8TT

UK registered charity: 1140295

New York

MTV Staying Alive, NYC Floor 35
1540 Broadway
New York, USA
NY 10036

 

  1. STEPHEN LEWIS FOUNDATION SUPPORT FOR HIV/AIDS.

The Stephen Lewis Foundation’s mandate is to:
·  provide care at community level to women who are dying, so that their last weeks, days, hours are free from pain, humiliation and indignity;
·  assist orphans and other AIDS-affected children, in every possible way, from the payment of school fees to the provision of food;
·  support the unsung heroes of Africa, the grandmothers, who bury their own children and care for their orphan grandchildren;
·  support associations of people living with HIV and AIDS, courageous men and women who have openly declared their status and who work to educate themselves and share information with the broader community on prevention, treatment, care and the elimination of stigma.
Organisations applying for a grant from the Stephen Lewis Foundation should fulfil the following criteria:
1. Be a registered CBO or NGO. This means you should be able to provide a copy of a letter from government proving your status, and/or a fund-raising or registration number.
2. Have a bank account or access to the bank account of an accredited NGO that is working on behalf of your organization.
3. Be committed to the principles of non-discrimination against all groups of people, with a particular commitment to women and people living with HIV/AIDS.
4. Have a sound financial system to manage grant expenditures;
5. Have a functioning board, steering committee and/or leadership structure that has women and people living with HIV/AIDS.
6. Be engaged in community-based activities aimed at assisting one or more of the following: orphans and vulnerable children; young people; women; caregivers/guardians, who are often grandmothers; and people living with HIV and AIDS.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Stephen Lewis Foundation
260 Spadina Avenue, Suite 501
Toronto, ON M5T 2E4
Canada
416- 533-9292 ext.0
1-888-203-9990 ext.0
416-850-4910
Email:
info@stephenlewisfoundation.org, media@stephenlewisfoundation.org,

  1. SURVIVE – MIVA GRANTS FOR DEVELOPING WORLD.

SURVIVE-MIVA is a Catholic Lay Association, founded in Liverpool, UK in 1974.
They exist to provide one vital element for successful health, pastoral, educational and developmental work in developing countries – a means of transport.
SURVIVE-MIVA’s fundamental aim is to provide mobility for outreach programmes which have been planned in collaboration and consultation with local communities in response to their needs and priorities.
Such work must be aimed at bringing about advances in the human and spiritual development of the people our beneficiaries live among and serve.
Though an application may be made via an individual, any grant made represents our support of a wider project involving more than one beneficiary.
Vehicles funded by our Association are the property of the parish, clinic, or centre where they are based.

  1. SWISS RE INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE AWARD.

Swiss Re International ReSource Award: Swiss Re, one of the world’s leading reinsurers with its corporate headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland, annually announces the International ReSource Award for Sustainable Watershed Management as part of its corporate responsibility programme.
It identifies water as a crucial resource necessary for the well being and health of humans and nature, but it continues to face threat due to various factors such as increasing demand for its consumption and climate change that could result in disasters for food production, health, environment and economic development.
The International ReSource Award for Sustainable Management “expresses the company’s commitment to planning, evaluating and realisation of water-related projects and aims to promote awareness and the efficient use of this precious resource.” It “is an internationally recognised prize for leadership in implementing the principles of sustainability in watershed management.”
The Award carries a cash of US $150,000 that could be awarded as a grant for one or several projects selected by an international jury through this open competition.
The prize money is used exclusively for implementing the project activities, but not for strengthening the organization.
To apply for the award, application forms and guidelines can be downloaded for the Swiss Re’s website.
Applications should clearly outline information about the project including the objectives, major activities and milestones, project plan including major budget items, implementation schedule, composition and references of the project team and the institutional set up.
The assessment criteria will include:
·  Expected impact regarding the ecological, economical and social dimension
·  Innovation
·  Involvement of local communities and institutions
·  Feasibility and governance of the project’s implementation
·  Financial structure and economic viability
·  Selected applicants will be further requested for submitting full proposals and a second phase selection process will take place.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Email: stefan.huber@resourceaward.org

  1. THE CHRISTENSEN FUND GRANTS.

The Christensen Fund (TCF) invites applications from institutions based anywhere in the world for grants within the framework of the “Global Biocultural Initiative (formerly known as: cross cutting)” component of our Program Strategy.
Maximum grant size is $200,000 over two years (larger grants are by invitation only).
The Christensen Fund (TCF) focuses its grantmaking on maintaining the rich diversity of the world—biological and cultural—over the long run, by focusing on five geographic regions including the African Rift Valley (especially Southwest Ethiopia and also Northern Kenya).
Grants within the regional programs are generally directed to organizations based within those regions or, where appropriate, to internationally based organizations working in support of the efforts of people and institutions on the ground.
Grant size is typically in the $50,000 to $100,000 range over one or two years; with larger multi-year grants being available generally to established local partners and per invitation only.
Please type “Application Questions” in the subject line of the e-mail.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
THE CHRISTENSEN FUND – 260 Townsend Street, Suite 600 • San Francisco, CA 94107

  1. THE DISABILITY RIGHTS FUND.

The Disability Rights Fund (DRF) seeks to strengthen the participation of Disabled Persons’ Organizations (DPOs) in the advancement of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country level in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union.
DRF grants are made to disabled persons organizations (DPOs) at country-level in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to support the advancement of rights described in the CRPD.
DRF funds both increased capacity of grassroots, marginalized and emergent groups of people with disabilities to advocate for their rights and ongoing efforts of national level disabled persons’ organizations to effect legislative and policy changes.
DRF supports projects that demonstrate a clear ability and commitment to contribute to the advancement of the human rights of persons with disabilities.
Grants provide one-year, project-specific support.
Cross-disability and other in-country partnerships are strongly encouraged, as are projects which address particularly marginalized sectors of the disability community.
Priority Areas:
Increasing DPO skill in addressing the CRPD by:
·  Building More Inclusive Organizations or Partnerships
·  Internal Capacity Building
Rights Advocacy and Monitoring Through:
·  Increasing DPO Participation in Decision-Making Processes Regarding the CRPD at state or local Levels
·  Addressing Implementation of CRPD Articles
·  Ratification Efforts (in the Pacific Island Countries only)
Funding Amounts and Project Duration:
·  Grant amounts range from USD 5,000 – USD 20,000.
·  Grants will support activities to be implemented over a period of 12 months.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

Disability Rights Fund
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111
USA

Telephone

+1.617.261.4593

Fax

+1.617.261.1977

Email

info@disabilityrightsfund.org

 

  1. THE LOURDES ARIZPE AWARD – GRANTS FOR NGOS AND ORGANIZATIONS.

The Lourdes Arizpe Award: The Lourdes Arizpe Award is a biennial award that honors individual anthropologists or anthropology students, teams, or organizations involving anthropologists, which have made outstanding contributions in the application of anthropology to environmental issues and discourse.
Nominations should focus on the contributions and accomplishments of the individual, team or organization in the arena of practice, policy, and application beyond academia.
The award can be for work in international or domestic arenas across all-ecological and policy applications, from community-based work to national policy to global applications.
There must be evidence of impact or results of the work within the past three years prior to the nomination.
The Lourdes Arizpe Award consists of two award categories:
1) for post-degree professionals; and
2) for students, defined as individuals who were enrolled at an academic institution at the time of the work for which the award is proposed.
Those receiving the award are not required to be United States citizens or members of the American Anthropological Association; they may be specialists in any recognized field of anthropology.
The Award Application Process:
Nominations may be made by any anthropologist, including self-nominations. Nomination packages should include four copies of:
1) A cover letter with original signature from the nominator indicating the body of work or action for which the nominations is being made;
2) Three letters of support from individuals knowledgeable regarding the work of the nominee(s) and its impact (it would be useful for at least two of these letters to be from individuals outside of academia); and
3) Any materials that support the candidacy of the nominee.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
General: Glenn Stone (
stone@wustl.edu)
Junior Scholar Award: Glenn Stone (
stone@wustl.edu)
Small Grants Program: Glenn Stone (
stone@wustl.edu)
Julian Steward Award: Glenn Stone (
stone@wustl.edu)
Rappaport Grad Student Award: Jim Igoe (
jji2e@eservices.virginia.edu>)
Section-sponsored symposia:  Courtney Carothers (
clcarothers@alaska.edu)
Press: Daniel Bornstein (
Daniel.Bornstein.14@dartmouth.edu)
Membership and finances: Rick Stepp (
stepp@anthro.ufl.edu)
Website: Daniel Tubb (
daniel@tubb.ca)
Engagement Blog: Janna Lafferty (
jlaff004@fiu.edu), Chris Hebdon (chris.hebdon@yale.edu), and Micha Rahder (micha.rahder@gmail.com)

 

  1. THE MONSANTO FUND GRANTS.

The Monsanto Fund works to substantially and meaningfully improve people’s lives around the world.
As the philanthropic arm of Monsanto, they are focused on one goal – strengthening both farming commuities and the communities where they live and work.
Eligible organizations include public charities incorporated in U.S. and working in a foreign country, indigenous public charities, units of government, private schools primarily serving an economically disadvantaged population, and private hospitals primarily serving an economically disadvantaged population.
The Monsanto Fund accepts grant proposals for programs outside of the U.S. in the following areas:
·  Providing basic education support designed to improve education in farming communities around the world, including supporting schools, libraries, science centers, farmer training programs and academic programs that enrich or supplement school programs
·  Meeting critical needs in communities by supporting nonprofit organizations that help with things such as food security, sanitation, access to clean water, public safety and various other local needs
Single grant requests must be for at least US $25,000.
Beyond that requirement, the grant sizes will vary by region.
Each region has an allocation of funding and will decide how many and the maximum size grants they will make in their country.

CONTACT ADDRESS.

Monsanto Fund
800 N. Lindbergh Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63167
Tel (+1) 314-694-1000

  1. THE NESTLE.

The Nestle Prize: The Nestlé Prize in Creating Shared Value will be awarded every other year to an individual, a non-governmental organization (NGO), or a business for developing an outstanding innovation that:
·  Has proven its worth on a small-scale;
·  Is judged to be feasible and applicable on a broader scale or in other communities; and
·  Has high promise of improving rural development, improving nutrition, improving access to clean water, or having a significant impact on water management.
The Nestle Prize in Creating Shared Value will be awarded for the first time in April to encourage and reward innovative approaches to the problems of nutrition, water and rural development.
Nestle believes that developing countries deserve more investment in key social sectors, and that rewarding truly significant and innovative efforts to meet the global challenges creates shared value for us all.
The Nestlé Prize in Creating Shared Value will commit to the Prize Laureate an investment of up to CHF 500,000 for a specified period of time to assist in the development of the innovation to bring it to scale.
That’s what makes the Nestlé Prize unique – a financial commitment that may continue for several years to ensure success.
The Nestle Prize in Creating Shared Value will recognize local efforts to practice the Creating Shared Value principle and will be awarded to an individual, NGO, or a business, which has demonstrated innovative techniques for improving access to and management of water, improving the lives of farmers and rural communities, or delivers high nutritional value to populations suffering from nutritional deficits.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Nestlé Headquarters
Nestlé S.A.
Avenue Nestlé 55,
1800 Vevey, Switzerland

+41 21 924 1111
07:30 – 18:00 CET
Monday to Friday

 THE RAMSER CONVENTION SMALL GRANTS FUND.

The Ramsar Convention Small Grants Fund: The Ramsar Small Grants Fund was established as a mechanism to assist developing countries and those with economies in transition in implementing the Convention and to enable the conservation and wise use of wetland resources.
Since its inception, it has provided funding and co-funding, up to 40,000 Swiss francs (about US$ 32,000) per project, for something like 198 projects in about 87 countries, totaling about 7.5 million francs.
Suitable project proposals are those which contribute to the implementation of the Convention’s Strategic Plan for the conservation and wise use of wetlands; provide emergency assistance for Ramsar sites; or provide ‘preparatory assistance’ to allow non-Contracting Parties to progress toward accession.
Successful proposals receive 80% of the allocated funds upon signature of the contract and the remainder upon submission of an adequate final report, but countries from which adequate final project reports have not been received may be denied further consideration for funding until those outstanding project dossiers have been closed.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Rue Mauverney 28
CH-1196 Gland, Switzerland
Tel.: +41 22 999 0170
Fax: +41 22 999 0169
E-Mail:
ramsar@ramsar.org

 

  1. THE UNITED NATION PUBLIC SERVICE GRANTS – GRANTS FOR NGOS AND ORGANISATIONS.

The United Nations Public Service Award is the most prestigious international recognition of excellence in public service.
It rewards the creative achievements and contributions of public service institutions that lead to a more effective and responsive public administration in countries worldwide.
Through an annual competition, the UN Public Service Awards promotes the role, professionalism and visibility of public service.
Award Application Eligibility Criteria:
·  All Public organizations/agencies at national and sub-national levels, as well as public/private partnerships and organizations performing outsourced public service functions, are eligible for nomination.
·  The United Nations Public Service Awards take into consideration a geographical distribution of five regions.
·  In order to level the playing field for nominations received from countries with varying levels of development and income, the following five regions have been established: Africa; Asia and the Pacific; Europe and North America; Latin America and the Caribbean; and Western Asia.
·  Nominations have to be made by another entity than the institution being nominated, i.e. selfnominations will not be accepted.
·  Eligible nominators include: Government departments and agencies; universities, non-governmental organizations, professional associations, etc.
·  Purely scientific innovations, e.g. in medical or environmental science, do not qualify for the United Nations Public Service Awards.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Mr. John-Mary Kauzya
Officer-in-Charge of the Division for Public Administration and Management (DPADM/UNDESA) and     Chief, Public Administration Capacity Branch (PACB/DPADM/UNDESA)
Tel: 1-212-963-1973 Fax: 1-212-963-2916 E-mail: kauzya@un.org

UNPSA Coordinators:

Ms. Adriana Alberti
UNPSA 2013 Forum Coordinator, eGovernment Branch (eGB/DPADM/UNDESA)
Tel: 1-212-963-2299 Fax: 1-212-963-2916 Email: alberti@un.org

Ms. Sirkka Nghilundilua
UNPSA Coordinator, Public Administration Capacity Branch (PACB/DPADM/UNDESA)
Tel: 1-212-963-3927 Fax: 1-212-963-2916 Email: nghilundilua@un.org

Ms. Flor Velazco-Juarez
Programme Assistant, Public Administration Capacity Branch (PACB/DPADM/UNDESA)
Tel: 1-917-3673004 Fax: 1-212-963-2916 Email: velazco-juarez@un.org

Mr. Nathan Henninger
UNPSA Communications and Outreach, UNPAN Management Unit (UMU/DPADM/UNDESA)
Tel: 1-917-367-6025 Fax: 1-212-963-2916 Email: henninger@un.org

UNPSA Partners:

Ms. Fatou Lo
UN Women
Email: fatou.lo@unwomen.org

 

  1. THINK TANK INITIATIVE FUNDING.

Think Tank Initiative Funding: Think Tank Initiative invites applications from independent African organisations that are committed to using research to inform and influence social and economic policy.
The Initiative will provide multi-year funding to promising think tanks, and will work with successful applicants to improve their organizational performance.
Grants:
The Initiative will make a series of core grants to cover operating and research costs as well as institutional strengthening activities.
Given limited resources available, the Initiative will initially focus on the following selected countries:
·  East Africa: Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda
·  West Africa: Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, and Senegal.
Grants will provide up to 30 percent of an institution’s overall budget over the funding period.
Core grants will be either a four-year renewable grant or a two-year renewable grant combined with dedicated capacity development to address key weaknesses.
Newly-established think tanks may be provided with a short-term grant to support a strategic planning exercise. Assuming successful completion of these grants, applicants would then be invited to re-apply for longer-term support.
Scholarship Eligibility Criteria:
·  Applicant is an existing or newly formed non-governmental, not-for-profit organization legally founded and registered as an independent entity3 in the country of operation.
·  Applicant possesses a track record of rigorous research and analysis on national social and economic policy issues related to growth, equity and poverty reduction.
·  Applicant is committed to using research to inform national public debate and to create spaces for discussion and new ideas.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

Mailing address           Street Address
PO Box 8500                 Ottawa, ON
Ottawa, ON                    Canada  K1POB2
Canada K1G 3H9

Phone:                             (+1) 613-236-6163
Fax:                                (+1) 613-238-7230
Email:                              info@idrc-ca

Media inquiries:              Isabelle Bourgeault-Tasse
(613) 696-2343
Email:                             ibourgeault-tasse@idrc.ca

Library reference desk:     reference@idrc.ca
IDRC publications:           info@idrc.ca
Careers:                             careers@idrc.ca
Fellowships and Awards:  awards@idrc.ca
Report website problems:  website@idrc.ca

Regional offices

Asia Regional Office
208 Jor Bagh, New Delhi 110003, India
Phone: (+91-11) 2461-9411
Fax: (+91-11) 2462-2707
Email:
aro@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/aro

Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean
Avenida Brasil 2655, 11300 Montevideo, Uruguay
Phone: (+598-2) 709-0042
Fax: (+598-2) 708-6776
Email: lacro@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/lacro 

Regional Office for Sub-Saharan Africa
PO Box 62084 00200, Nairobi, Kenya
Street address: Liaison House, 2nd floor
State House Avenue, Nairobi, Kenya
(please address all mail to the IDRC Regional Director)
Phone: (+254- 20) 2713-160/61
Fax: (+254-20) 2711-063
Email: 
rossa@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/rossa

Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa
PO Box 14 Orman, Giza, Cairo, Egypt
Street address: 8 Ahmed Nessim Street, 8th floor
Giza, Cairo, Egypt
Phone: (+202) 336-7051/52/53/54/57
Fax: (+20-2) 336-7056
Email: mero@idrc.ca
Web:
www.idrc.ca/mero 

 

  1. TWAS – AAS – MICROSOFT AWARD FOR YOUNG SISTERS.

Microsoft Research, in partnership with TWAS, the academy of sciences for the developing world, and AAS, the African Academy of Sciences, has established the TWAS-AAS-Microsoft Award for young scientists to recognize young scientists working and living in Africa whose research in computer science has had, or could have, a positive impact in the developing world.
·  Each year three winners will be selected from three different African countries.
·  Each winner will receive EUR 7,000, generously contributed by Microsoft Research, of which EUR 2,000 may be spent at the recipient’s discretion and EUR 5,000 shall be earmarked for further research. Each prize also carries a certificate bearing a citation highlighting the major contributions for which the prize is awarded.
·  The prizes will be presented to the recipients at a special ceremony to be held each year in Nairobi, Kenya, and organized by TWAS and AAS.
Eligibility:
·  Nominees can be any nationality, but must have been resident in Africa for at least two years prior to their nomination.
·  Nominees must have received their most recent degree (Master’s or Ph.D.) within the previous ten years.

CONTACT ADDRESS.

The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS)
ICTP Campus
Strada Costiera 11
34151 Trieste
Italy
Location of offices
TWAS
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, 1st floor
Via Beirut 6
34151 Trieste
Italy
OWSD, IAP, IAMP
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Via Grignano
34151 Trieste
Italy
TWAS Regional Offices

Phone: Please refer to the directory below. NB: International callers MUST dial the zero after the code for Italy. The prefix “040” must also be dialled within the local area.

Director’s Office
Romain Murenzi
TWAS Executive Director
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 108
Phone: +39 040 2240-327
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org
Giusto Sciarabba
Special Advisor
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-384
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: sciarabba•twas.org
Sandra Ravalico
Senior Secretarial Assistant
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 109
Phone: +39 040 2240-327
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org
Helen Martin
Office Assistant
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 109
Phone: +39 040 2240-427
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org, annualmeetings•twas.org
Vanessa Varnier
Clerk
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 109
Phone: +39 040 2240-359
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org, annualmeetings•twas.org
Public Information Office
Edward Lempinen
Public Information Officer
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 107
Phone: +39 040 2240-512
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: lempinen•twas.org
Gisela Isten
TWAS yearbook, website, databases, statistics
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 106
Phone: +39 040 2240-326
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: webmaster•twas.org, yearbook•twas.org
Cristina Serra
Staff writer
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 113
Phone: +39 040 2240-429
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: cserra•twas.org
Mobile: +39 338 430-5210
Sean Treacy
Staff writer
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 113
Phone: +39 040 2240-538
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: streacy•twas.org
Programmes and Activities
Lucilla Spini
Programme Officer
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-692
Fax: +39 040 2240-688
E-mail: lspini•twas.org
Antonella Mastrolia
Prizes
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-387
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: prizes•twas.org
Maria Teresa Mahdavi
Research grants, support for scientific meetings
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 114
Phone: +39 040 2240-325
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: mahdavi•twas.org, researchgrants•twas.org,
scientificmeetings•twas.org
Cristina Simoes
Postgraduate and postdoctoral fellowships
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-314
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: fellowships•twas.org
Payal Patel
Postgraduate and postdoctoral fellowships & Prizes
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-493
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: fellowships•twas.org
Fabrizia Niscio
Affiliates, associates, visiting scientists,
research professors, TWAS-DFG visits,
EuroAfrica ICT

ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-330
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: associateship•twas.org, exchanges•twas.org,
ict-forum@twas.org
Sabina Caris
Affiliates, associates, visiting scientists,
research professors, TWAS-DFG visits,
EuroAfrica ICT

ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-330
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: associateship•twas.org, exchanges•twas.org,
ict-forum@twas.org
Finance and Administration
Patricia Presiren
Financial matters
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 110
Phone: +39 040 2240-324
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: finance•twas.org
Paola Vespa
Financial matters
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 110
Phone: +39 040 2240-320
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: finance•twas.org
Nino Coppola
Administration and procurement
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 111
Phone: +39 040 2240-386
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: admin•twas.org, info•twas.org
Alessandra Piani
Financial and administrative matters
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 110
Phone: +39 040 2240-685
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: finance•twas.org
Ezio Vuck
Driver; mailing services
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, TWAS Library Area
Phone: +39 040 2240-693, +39 3407744511 (mobile)
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: vuck•twas.org
Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD)
Tonya Blowers
OWSD Coordinator
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-682
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: tblowers•owsd.net
Leena Mungapen
OWSD Secretariat
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-321
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: info•owsd.net
URL: www.owsd.net
Sara Dalafi
OWSD postgraduate fellowships for women
TWAS Science Policy/Diplomacy Programme
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-687
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: info•owsd.net
URL: www.owsd.net
IAP, the global network of science academies
Peter McGrath
IAP Coordinator
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-571
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: mcgrath•twas.org
URL: www.interacademies.net
Joanna Lacey
IAP Secretariat
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-680
Fax: +39 040 2240-688
E-mail: iap•twas.org
URL: www.interacademies.net
InterAcademy Medical Panel (IAMP)
Peter McGrath
IAMP Coordinator
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-571
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: mcgrath•twas.org
URL: www.iamp-online.org
Muthoni Kareithi
IAMP Secretariat
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-681
Fax: +39 040 2240-688
E-mail: iamp•twas.org
URL: www.iamp-online.org

 TWAS GRANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.

TWAS Grants for Scientific Meetings in Developing Countries: With funds provided by the Italian government, The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World.
(TWAS) encourages the organization of high level international and regional scientific activities in developing countries by offering financial assistance to the organizers of conferences, workshops, symposia and special meetings held in these countries.
Grants are offered for meetings in the following fields of natural sciences: agricultural, biological, chemical, engineering, geological and medical sciences.
The support is provided as travel grants for principal speakers from abroad and/or participants from developing countries other than the country where the meeting is held.
The amount provided normally does not exceed US$3,000. TWAS only considers applications made by organizers of international and regional scientific meetings in developing countries – it does not provide support to individual scientists.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS)
ICTP Campus
Strada Costiera 11
34151 Trieste
Italy
Location of offices
TWAS
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, 1st floor
Via Beirut 6
34151 Trieste
Italy
OWSD, IAP, IAMP
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Via Grignano
34151 Trieste
Italy
TWAS Regional Offices

Phone: Please refer to the directory below. NB: International callers MUST dial the zero after the code for Italy. The prefix “040” must also be dialled within the local area.

Director’s Office
Romain Murenzi
TWAS Executive Director
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 108
Phone: +39 040 2240-327
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org
Giusto Sciarabba
Special Advisor
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-384
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: sciarabba•twas.org
Sandra Ravalico
Senior Secretarial Assistant
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 109
Phone: +39 040 2240-327
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org
Helen Martin
Office Assistant
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 109
Phone: +39 040 2240-427
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org, annualmeetings•twas.org
Vanessa Varnier
Clerk
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 109
Phone: +39 040 2240-359
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: edoffice•twas.org, annualmeetings•twas.org
Public Information Office
Edward Lempinen
Public Information Officer
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 107
Phone: +39 040 2240-512
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: lempinen•twas.org
Gisela Isten
TWAS yearbook, website, databases, statistics
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 106
Phone: +39 040 2240-326
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: webmaster•twas.org, yearbook•twas.org
Cristina Serra
Staff writer
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 113
Phone: +39 040 2240-429
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: cserra•twas.org
Mobile: +39 338 430-5210
Sean Treacy
Staff writer
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 113
Phone: +39 040 2240-538
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: streacy•twas.org
Programmes and Activities
Lucilla Spini
Programme Officer
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-692
Fax: +39 040 2240-688
E-mail: lspini•twas.org
Antonella Mastrolia
Prizes
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-387
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: prizes•twas.org
Maria Teresa Mahdavi
Research grants, support for scientific meetings
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 114
Phone: +39 040 2240-325
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: mahdavi•twas.org, researchgrants•twas.org,
scientificmeetings•twas.org
Cristina Simoes
Postgraduate and postdoctoral fellowships
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-314
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: fellowships•twas.org
Payal Patel
Postgraduate and postdoctoral fellowships & Prizes
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-493
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: fellowships•twas.org
Fabrizia Niscio
Affiliates, associates, visiting scientists,
research professors, TWAS-DFG visits,
EuroAfrica ICT

ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-330
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: associateship•twas.org, exchanges•twas.org,
ict-forum@twas.org
Sabina Caris
Affiliates, associates, visiting scientists,
research professors, TWAS-DFG visits,
EuroAfrica ICT

ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-330
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: associateship•twas.org, exchanges•twas.org,
ict-forum@twas.org
Finance and Administration
Patricia Presiren
Financial matters
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 110
Phone: +39 040 2240-324
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: finance•twas.org
Paola Vespa
Financial matters
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 110
Phone: +39 040 2240-320
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: finance•twas.org
Nino Coppola
Administration and procurement
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 111
Phone: +39 040 2240-386
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: admin•twas.org, info•twas.org
Alessandra Piani
Financial and administrative matters
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, Room 110
Phone: +39 040 2240-685
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: finance•twas.org
Ezio Vuck
Driver; mailing services
ICTP Enrico Fermi Building, TWAS Library Area
Phone: +39 040 2240-693, +39 3407744511 (mobile)
Fax: +39 040 224559
E-mail: vuck•twas.org
Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD)
Tonya Blowers
OWSD Coordinator
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-682
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: tblowers•owsd.net
Leena Mungapen
OWSD Secretariat
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-321
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: info•owsd.net
URL: www.owsd.net
Sara Dalafi
OWSD postgraduate fellowships for women
TWAS Science Policy/Diplomacy Programme
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-687
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: info•owsd.net
URL: www.owsd.net
IAP, the global network of science academies
Peter McGrath
IAP Coordinator
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-571
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: mcgrath•twas.org
URL: www.interacademies.net
Joanna Lacey
IAP Secretariat
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-680
Fax: +39 040 2240-688
E-mail: iap•twas.org
URL: www.interacademies.net
InterAcademy Medical Panel (IAMP)
Peter McGrath
IAMP Coordinator
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-571
Fax: +39 040 2240-689
E-mail: mcgrath•twas.org
URL: www.iamp-online.org
Muthoni Kareithi
IAMP Secretariat
ICTP Adriatico Guesthouse, 7th floor
Phone: +39 040 2240-681
Fax: +39 040 2240-688
E-mail: iamp•twas.org
URL: www.iamp-online.org
  1. UN HABITAT YOUYH FUND FOR NGOS AND CBOS.

UN-HABITAT Youth Fund for NGOs and CBOs helps mobilize young people for advocating for youth-related policy formulation; support governmental and non-governmental agencies to respond to youth concerns; support youth information networks; implement new ideas on employment, governance, adequate shelter and secure tenure; share best practices; promote vocation training for entrepreneurship and employment; and promote gender mainstreaming in all urban youth matters.
NGOs and community-based nonprofit organizations led by young people aged 15-32 years in developing countries can apply for this Fund (This can also mean that if the governing or management board of an NGO has an active representation of one or more young persons between 15-32 years, it can still apply for this Fund-partnerships between adults and young persons are also encouraged).
Applicant organizations should be based in cities or towns with more than 10,000 inhabitants and they must be legally registered for at least one year and should have a valid bank account.
If small applicant organizations do not have legal registration but still fulfill the eligibility criteria, they can apply in partnership with another legally registered organization which can facilitate the grantmaking process.
Proposals can be submitted in English, French or Spanish. The application form can be downloaded from the UN-HABITAT website.
Supporting documents need to be submitted along with the completed application form. Submissions can be made by email.
However, there are different emails for different regions. Budgetary limitations have been specified: small projects can request up to $5000 while larger projects can receive grants of up to $25,000.
Proposed projects should schedule the starting date of implementation six months after the submission deadline and should last for less than 12 months.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
African and Arab States
United Nations Human Settlements Programme, Partners and Youth Branch, Monitoring and Research Division, UN Gigiri, N-block, 1st floor
P.O. Box 30030, 00100 GPO Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254 20 762 3900
Attn: UN-HABITAT Youth Fund
youthfund@unhabitat.org
www.unhabitat.org/youthfund
Latin-America and the Caribbean
Programa de las Naciones Unidas para los Asentamientos Humanos, Oficina Regional para América Latina y el Caribe (ROLAC)
Rua Rumânia 20 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 22240-140
Tel: +55-21-3235-8550
Attn: UN-HABITAT Youth Fund
youthfund@onuhabitat.org
www.onuhabitat.org
Asia and the Pacific
eSocialSciences
T-131, Tower 1, 3rd Floor,
International Infotech Park,
Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400703,
Maharashtra, India.
Tel: +91 22 27814436
Attn: UN-HABITAT Youth Fund
youthfund@esocialsciences.com

 

  1. UNEP SASAKAWA PRIZE.

UNEP Sasakawa Prize: UNEP is the United Nations system’s designated entity for addressing environmental issues at the global and regional level.
Its mandate is to coordinate the development of environmental policy consensus by keeping the global environment under review and bringing emerging issues to the attention of governments and the international community for action.
The UNEP Sasakawa Prize recognizes laureates with a proven record of achievement, as well as the potential to make outstanding contributions to the environment consistent with UNEP’s policy and objectives.
This international award is a partnership between UNEP and The Nippon Foundation.
The search is on for the most innovative, groundbreaking and sustainable grassroots environmental initiatives in emerging and developing countries!
The winner receives $200,000 cash prize.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Avenue, Gigiri
PO Box 30552, 00100
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: (254-20) 7621234
E-mail List:
General information:
unepinfo@unep.org
Webmaster:
unepweb@unep.org
Audiovisual:
unepaudiovisual@unep.org
Champions of the Earth:
championsoftheearth@unep.org
Children & Youth:
children.youth@unep.org
Executive Office:
executiveoffice@unep.org
JPO Programme:
JPOCoordinator@unep.org
Library:
uneplib@unep.org
Media:
unepnewsdesk@unep.org
Publications:
uneppubs@unep.org
Sport & Environment:
sport.environment@unep.org
World Environment Day:
worldenvironmentday@unep.org

 

  1. UNESCO/ANSTI DIASPORA AWARD.

UNESCO/ANSTI is inviting African scientists working in the Diaspora to apply for the above award.
The award is offered to scientists who wish to attend scientific thematic conferences and workshops in Africa.
The award will cover the the cost of the air ticket, cost of accommodation and a daily subsistence amounts for the duration of the conference.
Women scientists working in the Diaspora are particularly encouraged to apply.
The application should include the following documents:
·  Letter of invitation from the conference organizers.
·  A letter accepting the paper you wish to present.
·  Your curriculum vitae.
·  Abstract of the Paper to be presented at the conference or workshop.
·  A budget breakdown of expected expenses.
·  The Conference Programme showing your presentation slot.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
ANSTI Coordinator, UNESCO Nairobi Office, Room C-116, P.O. BOX 30592, 00100,Nairobi Kenya. Tel: +254-20-7622619/20 Fax+254-20-7622538

 

  1. UNESCO ASCHBERG BURSARIES.

UNESCO-Aschberg Bursaries: The UNESCO-Aschberg Bursaries for Artists Programme promote the mobility of young artists in order to enrich their personal perspectives, to develop their creative project, enabling them to engage in a cultural diversity dialogue.
The Programme offers residencies to young artists (between 25 and 35 years old) worldwide.
The Aschberg Bursaries Programme gives priority to artists and institutions in developing countries, in order to enhance North-South and South-South cooperation.
The bursaries are intended for professional artists and writers wishing to enrich their careers by acquiring experience abroad.
UNESCO-Aschberg advocates and promotes creativity, highlights cultural exchanges and the need for artists to enrich their experience through contact with other cultures.
These residencies are catalysts for the development of artistic expression in all cultures of the world.
The bursaries are limited and are awarded on a selective basis. The pre-selection of candidates is carried out by the institutions. Artists must therefore apply directly to the institution of their interest, depending on the discipline and/orcountry sought.
The application file is to be submitted directly to the institution of interest.
UNESCO-Aschberg Bursaries General Remarks 

  • Applicants may submit only one application per year and can participate in the Programme only once in their careers. 
  • Candidates who are nationals of the country where the chosen institution is located are not eligible. 
  • In some cases, a document proving language proficiency is required by the host institution.
  • The institutions pre-select three candidates to submit to UNESCO. It is up to the Organization to take the final decision based on its own criteria: geographical distribution and gender balance. 
  • The laureates are then informed of their selection by the institutions where they have been granted residency. 
  • The respective institution and successful laureate then sign a mutually binding agreement. 

CONTACT ADDRESS.
General phone:
+33 (0)1 45 68 10 00
Fax:
+33 (0)1 45 67 16 90
Telex:
204461 Paris;
270602 Paris

 

  1. UNFPA SPECIAL YOUTH PROGRAMME GRANT.

This programme is designed to give young people from developing countries opportunities to engage in policy development and programming; to help build the capacity of young people; and to sensitize both the young people and UNFPA staff on partnering to address adolescent and youth issues.
Grants/Financial Support
All selected candidates will be provided:
·  Cost of return travel from country of origin
·  Assistance with travel documents and visa requirements
·  Health insurance
·  Housing arrangements
·  Subsistence allowance (for meals and other basic needs)
·  A workstation and internet access
·  Opportunities to be mentored by UNFPA staff on issues of interest
·  Administrative assistance as required
Candidates should:
·  be between 20-24 years old during the fellowship
·  be residents and nationals of a developing country (Applicants from developed countries will not be considered for this programme, but are invited to apply for UNFPA’s regular internship programme)
·  have established interest and dedication to development issues through previous experiences or affiliation with a youth network or NGO working on development issues
·  have basic leadership and advocacy skills
·  have basic understanding of issues of importance to UNFPA and what the organization stands for
·  have English language skills (written and oral)
·  have a commitment to return to home country to undertake follow up work with young people

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Email: awasthi[at]unfpa.org

 

  1. UN GIFT SMALL GRANTS.

UN.GIFT Small Grants: UN.GIFT has established a Small Grants Facility with the overall objective to increase and improve support structures for victims of human trafficking around the world.
Through a Call for Proposals, relevant organizations will be identified and the most promising projects will be selected.
Civil society organizations will receive grants either to sustain existing anti-human trafficking initiatives or to engage in additional counter-trafficking activities.
In additions, the UN.GIFT website will provide a virtual forum for CSOs to promote their projects, to network with other stakeholders and to showcase their activities to the international community.
The following activities are a priority for UN.GIFT Small Grants:
·  The empowerment of vulnerable groups and communities
·  Direct victim support
·  Cooperation between NGOs from countries of origin and destination
·  Collection of evidence-based knowledge

CONTACT ADDRESS.

 

  1. UNHCR NANSEN REFUGEE AWARD.

UNHCR Nansen Refugee Award: The Nansen Refugee Award is offered to an individual or organization annually “in recognition of extraordinary and dedicated service to refugees and is the most prestigious honour conferred by UNHCR.”
It is offered to any person or organization from any country irrespective of creed, colour, age or profession.
Anyone can nominate an organization or individual for the Award. There is a special committee appointed by UNHCR to select the final winner.
The Award has a commemorative medal and a US $100,000 monetary prize which is donated by the governments of Norway and Switzerland.
The monetary prize that accompanies the Nansen Award is intended to enable the recipient to pursue refugee assistance projects drawn up in consultation with UNHCR.
“The monetary prize that accompanies the Nansen Award is intended to enable the recipient to pursue refugee assistance projects drawn up in consultation with UNHCR. To date, so-called Nansen Fund projects have benefitted refugees in places such as Cambodia, Botswana and Venezuela.”
Nominations can be submitted online through the UNHCR website.
Email:
nansen@unhcr.org
UNHCR is based in Geneva, Switzerland.
Our address:
Nansen Committee Secretariat
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Case Postale 2500
CH-1211 Genève 2 Dépôt
Suisse.

Our telephone number:
+41 22 739 8111 (automatic switchboard)
Our fax number:
+41 22 739 7377

 

  1. UNITED NATIONS DEMOCRACY FUND (UNDF)

UNDEF Grants: United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF) primary purpose is to strengthen the voice of civil society and ensure the participation of all groups in democratic practices.
The Fund complements current UN efforts to strengthen and expand democracy worldwide and funds projects that enhance democratic dialogue and support for constitutional processes, civil society empowerment, including the empowerment of women, civic education and voter registration, citizen’s access to information, participation rights and the rule of law in support of civil society and transparency and integrity.
The following institutions are eligible for UNDEF grant funding:
·  Civil Society Organizations and Non-Governmental Organizations, engaged in promoting democracy which are anticipated to receive the bulk of the funding.
·  Independent and Constitutional Bodies, including Election Commissions, Ombudsman Institutions, National Human Rights Institutions and other independent governance bodies, for project proposals facilitating the inclusion of the voice of civil society.
·  Global and Regional inter-government bodies, organizations and associations other than the United Nations, for project proposals which strengthen the voice of civil society.
In principle, UNDEF grants will be allocated for projects with default duration of two years.
However, it is fully acceptable to UNDEF if a successful applicant completes a project in less than 2 years. Grants will not necessarily match the full amounts applied for.
Grant allocations will in principle not exceed US$500,000 for any given project, and will be of a minimum of US$50,000.
Once the implementation period has elapsed, beneficiaries will be required to revert unspent funding to UNDEF.
While applications from all countries will be considered, strong preference will be given to applicants from countries and regions where the challenges of democracy are more critical, such as countries emerging from conflict, new and restored democracies, the Least Developed Countries (as per the official classification of the UN-OHRLLS), Low Income Countries (“Low Income Economies” as per the World Bank’s official classification based on Gross National Income per capita) and Middle Income Countries (“Lower and Upper Middle-income Economies”, idem).

CONTACT ADDRESS.
The United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF)
1 United Nations Plaza, Room DC1-1300
New York, NY 10017, USA
Tel: +1 212 963 3399
Tel: +1 917 367 8062
Fax: +1 212 963 1486
Email:
democracyfund@un.org

 

  1. UNITED NATION POPULATIONS AWARD.

 Each year, the Committee for the United Nations Population Award presents an award to an individual(s) and/or institution(s) in recognition of outstanding contributions to increasing the awareness of population questions and to their solution.
The Award, which was established by the General Assembly in November 1981, in resolution 36/201, and was first presented in 1983, consists of a gold medal, a diploma and a monetary prize.
Nominations:
Written nominations for the Award may be received from:
·  Governments of Members States;
·  Intergovernmental organizations engaged in population-related activities;
·  Population-related non-governmental organizations having consultative status with the United Nations;
·  University professors of population or population-related institutions; and
·  Laureates of the Award.
Each nominator is asked to submit no more than one nomination, either for an individual or for an institution.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Dr. Josephine Ojiambo (
Jojiambo@unfpa.org).

  1. UNITED NATION VOLUNTARY FUND ON CONTEMPORARY FORMS OF SLAVERY GRANTS.

The Fund focuses particularly on individuals who suffer from the most severe forms of human rights violations occurring in the context of slavery, as well as the most identifiable contemporary forms of slavery – chattel slavery, debt bondage, human trafficking, serfdom, child labour and servitude, forced labour, and/or forced marriage.
The distinctive value of the Fund is its ability to provide concrete assistance to the victims of contemporary forms of slavery including housing, legal aid, psycho-social support, food, medical care, training and sustainable sources of incomes.
Previous projects undertaken with the Fund’s grants include medical, psychological, education and housing assistance aid for women and girls victims of forced marriages in the Middle East region, vocational training to victims of human trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation in the African region; support to rehabilitation centers for sexually and physically abused street children in the Latin American region, support for children used as jockey camels and projects to identify and release bonded labourers in the agriculture, carpet and construction industries.
The Fund bridges the gaps not addressed by other UN programmes and has a dynamic and integrated approach.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

  1. UN PERMANENT FORUM GRANTS.

UN Permanent Forum Grants: The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNFPII) is the advisory body to the United Nations Economic and Social Council for discussing indigenous issues related to economic and social development, culture, the environment, education, health and human rights.
It has a Trust Fund on Indigenous Issues relating to the Second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People.
Indigenous peoples’ organizations, associations and NGOs, academic and other nonprofit organizations and national committees for the Second International Decade can apply for the Trust Fund’s Small Grants Programme.
Projects can be proposed in the areas of culture, education, health, human rights, the environment and social and economic development. All projects should primarily be focused upon indigenous peoples and they should directly benefit them.
The guidelines suggest that the project proposals should be developed by indigenous people, but in cases where non-indigenous organizations are submitting proposals, they should develop them with full participation, consultation and free, prior and informed consent of indigenous peoples, groups or committees receiving the benefits of the project.
All projects should take into account gender balance; projects focusing on indigenous women, children and youth will be given special consideration. Sustainability and long-term impact of the project should also be presented.
Grants of up to $10,000 for over a period of one year can be requested from the Trust Fund.
Although the Fund does not support multi-year projects, but successful applicants can submit proposal requests for following years for a funding of $5000 per year over the decade.
Even proposals requesting grants over $10,000 may also be accepted provided that there is enough project justification, organizational capacity to absorb the funds.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

  1. USAID DEVELOPMENT GRANTS PROGRAMME.

USAID Development Grants Program: The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Office of Innovation and Development Alliances (IDEA), Local Sustainability (LS) Division, is inviting applications from local NGOs (LNGOs) and also US private and voluntary organizations to apply for grants under the Development Grants Program.
The IDEA Office seeks to reach development goals more quickly, cost-efficiently, sustainably, and at wider scale through innovation (meaning significant, not incremental, improvements in development impact) and partnership.
The LS Division of IDEA works to improve the sustainability of civil society organizations by focusing on supporting innovative local development projects and capacity development.
The overall objective of the DGP is to contribute to improved and sustainable grass roots development by supporting development projects and strengthening capacities of nascent development partners in countries where the DGP is active.
The DGP has a priority of strengthening LNGOs and US PVOs, recognizing that a vibrant and active NGO sector is fundamental to promoting a healthy democracy that is accountable and responsive to citizens’ needs.
NGOs in select countries can apply for select sectors which can include rural development, basic education, micoenterprise, health- HIV and AIDS, water, democracy and governance, business advocacy, energy efficiency awareness etc.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
Phone: 1-800-518-4726 (local toll free). For International callers, please dial 606-545-5035 to speak with a Contact Center representative.
Email: support@grants.gov

  1. USC CANADA GRANTS.

USC Canada Grants: USC Canada was founded by Dr. Lotta Hitschmanova in 1945 as the Unitarian Service Committee of Canada.
USC Canada promotes vibrant family farms, strong rural communities, and healthy ecosystems around the world.
With engaged Canadians and partners in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, USC supports programs, training, and policies that strengthen biodiversity, food sovereignty, and the rights of those at the heart of resilient food systems; women, indigenous peoples and small-scale farmers.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
56 Sparks Street, Suite 705
Ottawa, ON Canada
K1P 5B1
(T) (613) 234-6827
(F) (613) 234-6842
1-800-56-56-USC (872)

  1. WALLACE GLOBAL FUND GRANTS WOMWN HUMANS RIGHTS PROGRAME.

The Wallace Global Fund (WGF) supports activities at the global and national level, and will consider significant local or regional initiatives offering the potential to leverage broader national or global impact.
The program areas are; Natural Resources, Civic Engagement, Media and Leadership, Justice and Women’s Human Rights.
The mission of the Wallace Global Fund is to promote an informed and engaged citizenry to fight injustice, and to protect the diversity of nature and the natural systems upon which all life depends.
WGF Women’s Human Rights Program
Population pressures exacerbate many of the fundamental obstacles to sustainable development: degradation of natural resources, income disparity, gender inequality and poor maternal and child health.
The Fund believes that it can uphold women’s human rights by expanding their reproductive health choices, thereby reducing unwanted childbearing and improving the lives of women and their families.
The Fund seeks policy initiatives which promote globally to:
·  Increase access to contraceptives
·  Increase access to emergency contraceptives
·  Improve adolescents’ ability to make informed choice and obtain Quality reproductive health services
·  Increase access to safe abortion
·  Resource mobilization in europe
·  Resource mobilization in u.s.
·  Eradication of female genital mutilation
·  Promote microenterprise
·  Ensure that millennium development goals (MDGS) prioritize reproductive health
Grant proposals are processed and reviewed on a continuous basis.
The average grant size is $50,000, with actual grant awards ranging up to $400,000.
The Fund makes both one-year and multi-year grants.
Wallace Global Fund will consider proposals for either core support or project-specific support.
WGF does not fund purchase of land, capital construction, profit-making businesses, debt reduction, endowment campaigns, fundraising drives/events, or scholarships, tuition assistance or other forms of personal financial aid.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
·  Wallace Global Fund
·  1990 M Street, NW, Suite 250, Washington, DC 20036, 202.452.1530

 

  1. WATER FUNDING FOR NGOS IN AFRICA.

Water Funding for NGOs in Africa: The Swiss nonprofit organization, WASSER FÜR WASSER (Water for Water) is providing funds local grassroots-based NGOs in Africa working in the field of WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene).
Proposals are considered for planned or already running projects.
Projects Requirements
·  Implementation of hardware for water access, supply and distribution (e.g. biosand filters, RWHarvesting, ponds, tube wells etc).
·  Focus on drinking water, but also sanitation and hygiene. Work on community and household level.
·  Holistic approach: combining hard& software (capacity building, awareness raising).
·  Solving gender issues in the field of WASH
·  Experience in cooperation with international partners.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

  1. WILLIAM . T. GRANTS SCHOLARS PROGRAME.

William T. Grant Scholars Program for Young Researchers in NGOs: The William T. Grant Foundation scholars program is meant for young researchers or professionals pursuing research and employed in a nonprofit organization within or outside United States.
As William T. Grant Scholars, the selected candidates will each receive a grant of $350,000 which will be distributed over a period of five years.
Early-career researchers in the field of social, behavioral or health sciences can apply for this program.
The Program prefers to support “applicants who already have a promising track record, but seek a qualitative shift in their trajectory as researchers.”
The Scholars should be ambitious in their research endeavors to tackle important questions that will advance theory, policy and practice for youth (8-25 years) and they use different methods, disciplinary perspectives and content knowledge in their studies.
Grants will be made available to organizations where the selected young researchers are working. Only tax-exempt nonprofit organizations or NGOs are eligible to receive these grants.

CONTACT ADDRESS
570 Lexington Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10022-6837
·  Phone:
·  212.752.0071
·  Fax:
·  212.752.1398

 

  1. WOMENS EMPOWERMENT GRANT.

Women’s Empowerment Grants: The Singapore Committee for UN Women and MasterCard have come together to organize a joint initiative called “Project Inspire: 5 Minutes to Change the World.” This competition aims to help young changemakers create a better world of opportunities for women and girls in Asia Pacific, the Middle East and Africa.
The competition seeks entries from 18-35 year olds to submit a 5-minute platform to pitch their inspired idea to the world. There is an opportunity to win a $25,000 grant.
The grant must show creativity and sustainable impact in the lives of women and girls across Asia, Pacific, the Middle East or Africa through entrepreneurship.
Entries should be submitted in the form of a (maximum) 5-minute video or a (maximum) 2-page A4-sized proposal.
Video entries are to be uploaded on any public video-sharing sites, such as YouTube or Vimeo. Links to the videos must be provided on the submission e-form.
Submissions, either video OR written, must be made in English.
Each proposal should address the following questions:
·  What is your inspirational idea?
·  How will your project change the lives of women and girls in the short and long term?
·  How will you/your team carry out the project?
·  How will you spend the US$25,000 grant to carry out the project?
·  How will you measure the success of the project?
Submissions should be accompanied by information on the existing program, biographies of the team members and any supporting materials (e.g. website, social media channels, media clippings, past awards)

CONTACT ADDRESS.
contact@5minutestochangetheworld..
media@5minutestochangetheworld.org

 

  1. WORLD FOOD PRIZE.

World Food Prize Foundation is pleased to invite nominations for foremost international award recognizing the accomplishments of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity, or availability of food in the world.

The Food Prize is a $250,000 award formally presented at the Laureate Award Ceremony in mid-October, on or around World Food Day, in conjunction with the Borlaug Dialogue international symposium.

This award will recognize exceptional, science-based achievement in international agriculture and food production by an individual under 40 who has clearly demonstrated intellectual courage, stamina, and determination in the fight to eliminate global hunger and poverty.

The award will honor an individual who is working closely and directly “in the field” or at the production or processing level with farmers, animal herders, fishers or others in rural communities, in any discipline or enterprise across the entire food production, processing, and distribution chain.
World Food Prize Eligibility & Criteria

  • Nominees must be under the age of 40
  • Nominees must be actively working in the discipline, research area, position, or on the project(s) for which they are being recognized. They may be associated with a public or private educational, research or development organization or related entity.
  • Nominees remain eligible for consideration beyond the year of their nomination, at the discretion of the Award Jury, as long as the award criteria and age requirement are met.
  • The award is intended to be presented to one person. In unusual and rare circumstances, another person may share the award for pronounced collaborative efforts and achievement.

World Food Prize – Documents Required

  • All nominations must be submitted in English online.
  • A concise statement (3000-word limit) explaining and describing-
  1. The nominee’s work and accomplishments, with details and examples that illustrate several of the criteria specified for this award
  2. How, in doing this work, the nominee reflects the attributes demonstrated by Dr. Borlaug during his early career
  3. The impact or results of the nominee’s work.
  • Nominee’s Curriculum Vitae or resume, including date of birth, country of origin, education, and professional background.
  • One (1) nomination letter and two (2) letters of support describing, explaining and emphasizing the main achievements of the nominee must be provided with the nomination.  Due to the high volume of nominations, please do not submit more than two support letters.
  • Photos: A head shot of the nominee is required (minimum 300 dpi resolution); 2 additional action photos of the nominee at work may also be submitted.

CONTACT ADDRESS.
World Food Prize
666 Grand Avenue Box 1700
Des Moines, IA USA 50309
Tel: (515) 245-3783 Fax: (515) 245-3785
E-mail:
wfp@worldfoodprize.org

 

  1. WORLD HABITAT AWARDS 11

World Habitat Awards: Individuals, organizations and governmental agencies with innovative and practical solution to housing needs and problems from any country of the world can apply for the World Habitat Awards.
The awards are given annually to projects that provide practical and innovative solutions to current housing needs and problems, from the global South as well as the North.
Two winners are selected and awarded with a prize each carrying an amount of £10,000. The award is presented at annual United Nations global celebration of World Habitat Day.
Awards Application Eligibility Criteria:
Projects & approaches are sought that:
·  Demonstrate practical, innovative and sustainable solutions to current housing issues faced by countries of the global South as well as the North.
·  Can be transferred or adapted for use as appropriate.
·  View the term habitat from a broad perspective and bring other benefits as well, such as energy or water saving, income generation, social inclusion, community and individual empowerment, capacity building or education.
The World Habitat Awards competition has a two-stage entry process:
Stage I: submissions need only comprise a summary of the key aspects of the project. From these preliminary submissions, ten projects are selected by an Assessment Committee to go forward to Stage II of the competition.
Stage II: submissions are evaluated by an independent advisory group before being put to a panel of international judges, which include the Executive Director of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) and the Rector of the United Nations University, Tokyo. Evaluation visits are carried out to some of the projects prior to the final judging
CONTACT ADDRESS.

Address
World Habitat Awards
Building and Social Housing Foundation
Memorial Square
Coalville
Leicestershire
LE67 3TU
UNITED KINGDOM

Tel : +44 (0)1530 510444
Fax : +44 (0)1530 510332
Email wha@bshf.org

 

Charity No. : 270987
Company No. : 1247918
  1. WORLD INNOVATION SUMMIT FOR EDUCATION AWARDS.

World Innovation Summit for Education Awards: The World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) is accepting submissions for the WISE Awards.
The awards identify, showcase and  promote six innovative educational projects every year; that are having a transformative impact on societies and education.

Each winning project receives international recognition and a prize of $20,000 (US).
In addition to this, the WISE Awards winning projects and finalists are given support and visibility through WISE media and communication channels such as film productions; participation in the annual WISE Summit and collaborative events where the projects are presented on a global stage; and the WISE Books.

WISE brings to light these educational models for their positive contribution within a community or society and their potential for scalability.
Year by year, WISE is building a community of educational innovators which offers a fertile environment for groundbreaking collaborations.

Innovations can be of many different kinds depending on the context. WISE therefore seeks to higlight today’s most innovative solutions and approaches to educational challenges confronting the world at large.

Project holders from any region, educational sector or level may submit applications which demonstrate the quality and impact of their activities in accordance with the criteria.
Whether you are involved in a project that provides access to quality education, creates new opportunities for lifelong learning or develops innovative educational technologies and approaches, WISE invites you to apply for the Awards.
CONTACT ADDRESS.

 

  1. WORLD SUMMIT YOUTH AWARD.

World Summit Youth Award: The WSYA (World Summit Youth Award) selects and promotes best practice in e-Content and technological creativity, demonstrates young people’s potential to create outstanding digital contents and serves as a platform for people from all UN member states to work together in the efforts to reduce poverty and hunger, and to tackle ill-health, gender inequality, lack of education, lack of access to clean water and environmental degradation.
WSYA is therefore both a showcase to the world for young e-content creators, journalists and writers, application designers, technologists and as well as a contribution on a global scale to adressing poverty, protecting the environment, sharing knowledge and empowering young people.
The WSYA is promoted in all UN member states through the networks of the World Summit Award (WSA) the UN Global Alliance for ICT, other participating UN Organisations and Agencies, governments and NGOs, youth organisations and all those committed to making a real difference in the achievement of the MDGs.
Award Application Eligibility Criteria:
To be eligible for the WSYA,
1. The project must be initiated and executed by youth under the age of 30.
2. The product should be fully functional and operational at the time of submission; projects which do not function will not be juried.
3. It must be accessible over the Internet (whether it is designed for fixed line, broadband or mobile use).
Submissions must be:
1. Made under one of the six categories: Fight Poverty, Hunger and Disease; Education for all; Power 2 Women; Create your Culture, Go Green and Pursue Truth.
2. Free of offensive or plagiarized content which violate dignity or human rights will not be evaluated.
3. Made by an authorized person.
CONTACT ADDRESS.
WSYA OFFICE
Prof. Dr. Peter A. Bruck
Chairman of the WSA Board | Honorary President of the ICNM
CEO & Chief Researcher, Research Studios Austria FG mbH

Charlotte Dreyer
Project Manager
T: +43.660 630408-6
M:
dreyer [at] icnm.net

Birgit Berger
Project Controlling
T: +43.660.630408-1
M:
berger [at] icnm.net

ICNM — International Center for New Media
Leopoldskronstrasse 30
A-5020 Salzburg
Austria      

 YOUTH CONFERENCE ON THE ENVIRONMENT GRANTS.

The United Nation Environment Programme in cooperation with UNEP National Committee for the Republic of Korea will be hosting the 2009 Tunza International Youth Conference on the Environment in Daejeon, Korea from the 21 to 26 August.
The Conference will collectively bring together about 200 young people (aged 15 to 24), to learn from one another and share experiences and ideas on environmental actions.
The participants will come from about 100 countries of the world.
The selection process will take into account gender and country representation.
The main youth conference will be held from 24 to the 26 August. The theme of the conference is Climate Change – Our challenge. The daily themes will include:
·  Climate Change: Limiting my Footprint
·  Youth and Green Jobs
·  Disasters and Conflicts and their Impact on the Environment
·  Sustainable lifestyles
Financial Support Details: Limited financial support will be available for participants from developing countries only.

CONTACT ADDRESS.

 3IE REQUEST FOR FUNDING PROPOSALS.

 3ie Request for Funding Proposals: The International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) has announced a request for proposals (RFP) for impact evaluations of social and economic development interventions in low and middle-income countries.
This call accepts proposals in any sector. Preference will be given to proposed studies that:
·  Are impact evaluations of large-scale development interventions and/or have a high probability of influencing policy;
·  Clearly elaborate the theory of change for the intervention and the assumptions underlying the theory of change;
·  Use mixed methods to explore the causal mechanisms behind interventions and measured outcomes;
·  Have a clearly demonstrated and close partnership with the implementing agency; and
·  Are produced by developing country researchers/evaluators or through a partnership between developed and developing country researchers/evaluators.
3ie hopes to make 6-10 awards of up to a total value of US$4 million under this RFP. There is no maximum size for individual grants.
There is a two stage submission process:
1. Submission of an expression of interest (EOI). The window for the EOI opens on June 1st. These one-page documents will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Notification of selection for the next phase will be given within 1-2 weeks of submission. If selected, applicants can begin drafting the full proposal at the time of notification. The final deadline for submitting EOIs is June 24th.
2. If the EOI is selected for the next phase, the full proposal must be submitted by August 30th.

 

CONTACT ADDRESS.
Tel:. 1808 – 521 – 1868
Email: info@aiu.edu
Web: www.aiu.edu

 Africa-Focused Grantmakers
http://fdncenter.org/pnd/specialissues/item.jhtml?id=3000057
This compilation of international philanthropy resources compiled by the Foundation Center in Philanthropy News Digest, March 27, 2001, includes a section of African Grantmakers.

Africa : Funding Sources
http://www.tgci.com/africa
Selected web links provided by the Grantsmanship Center.

African Development Bank (AfDB)
http://www.afdb.org/en/
The African Development Bank is the premier financial development institution of Africa, dedicated to combating poverty and improving the lives of people of the continent and engaged in the task of mobilizing resources towards the economic and social progress of its Regional Member Countries. The AfDB joins with the African Development Fund and the Nigeria Trust Fund to form the AfDB Group. The AfDB Group makes loans and equity investments in the public and private sectors of its African member countries. The AfDB provides technical assistance for investment projects; works with its member countries to coordinate development policies and plans; and provides financial support to its members in emergencies. Current annual financial commitments by the AfDB Group are the equivalent of about US$3 billion. Infrastructure projects and multi-sector operations (i.e., assistance to governments for debt relief and policy-based loans) are the largest part of AfDB’s financial portfolio. Health, education, and finance are one-fourth of the total. Agriculture and environment are moderately important, summing to almost 18% of loans and grants (year 2005).

African Development Foundation
Development Funding Assistance Programs
http://www.adf.gov/programs.html
The African Development Foundation (ADF) is the principal agency of the U. S. Government that supports community-based, self-help initiatives that alleviate poverty and promote sustainable development in Africa. Established by Congress in 1980 (see the African Development Foundation Act), it became operational in 1984. Over the last fifteen years, ADF has funded over 1300 activities in 34 African countries.

Aga Khan Development Network
http://www.akdn.org/
The Aga Khan Foundation is a non-denominational, international development agency established by His Highness the Aga Khan in 1967. Its mission is to develop and promote creative solutions to problems that impede social development, primarily in Asia and East Africa. Created as a private, non-profit foundation under Swiss law, it has branches and independent affiliates in 12 countries. It is a modern vehicle for traditional philanthropy in the Ismaili Muslim community under the leadership of the Aga Khan.

American-Himalayan Foundation
http://www.himalayan-foundation.org/
A non-profit organization dedicated to helping the people and ecology of the Himalaya.

Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development (AFESD)
http://www.arabfund.org/
AFESD has been participating in the financing of economic and social development projects in the Arab World since 1968.

Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and and Pacific Island Funding Sources
http://www.tgci.com/asia-australia-new-zealand-pacific-islands
Selected web links provided by the Grantsmanship Center.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Asia Foundation
http://www.asiafoundation.org/
The Asia Foundation undertakes grant making with organizations as a collaborative process of problem identification and strategic planning within our four areas of programming interest: Governance and Law , Women’s Political Participation, Economic Reform and Development, and Regional Relations.Please review our country programs highlights and current Project Lists to see if your project falls within the scope of the Foundation’s current programs. Most grants are given to organizations in Asia and no grants are given to individuals.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Asia Pacific Philanthropy Information Network
http://www.asianphilanthropy.org/
Includes information about philanthropy and the third sector in Australia, China, Hong Kong SAR, Japan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. Includes information about funding activities as well.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Asian Cultural Council
http://www.asianculturalcouncil.org/
The Asian Cultural Council, a foundation supporting cultural exchange in the visual and performing arts between the United States and the countries of Asia, is an affiliate of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Asian Development Bank
http://www.adb.org/
The Asian Development Bank (ADB) defines its mission as helping its developing country member countries to reduce poverty and improve the quality of life of their citizens. Its instruments for providing assistance are policy dialogue, loans, technical assistance, grants, guarantees, and equity investments. Its annual lending volume is about $6 billion. Expenditures on technical assistance usually total about $180 million annually.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Australian Agency for International Development
http://www.ausaid.gov.au
AusAID is the Australian Government agency responsible for managing the Australian Government’s official overseas aid program. The objective of the aid program is to advance Australia’s national interest by helping developing countries reduce poverty and achieve sustainable development. Scholarships are one of the most valued forms of development cooperation. The Australian Government’s overseas aid program aims to increase access to and the quality of education and training for people in partner countries. The program provides selective assistance in distance eduction, higher education and institutional strengthening.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Canada : Funding Sources
http://www.tgci.com/canada
Selected web links provided by the Grantsmanship Center.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Canadian Government Grants and Loans
http://www.governmentgrants.com/
The Canadian Government has over 900 different programs through which it offers low-cost loans and grants to citizens of Canada needing affordable business financing. The estimated annual expenditure for programs administered at both the Federal and Provincial levels is in excess of ninety billion dollars ($90,000,000,000).
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/INDEX-E.HTM
The Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) is the federal agency charged with planning and implementing most of Canada’s development cooperation program in order to reduce poverty and to contribute to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world. CIDA administers approximately 80 percent of the aid budget. The other 20 percent is administered by the Department of Finance, the Foreign Affairs Canada and the International Development Research Centre. CIDA supports projects in more than 150 countries, which represent four fifths of the world’s population. CIDA works in partnership with developing countries, Canadian organizations, institutions and businesses, as well as international organizations and agencies.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Canadian International Development Research Centre (IRDC)
http://www.idrc.ca/
IDRC is a Canadian Crown corporation that works in close collaboration with researchers from the developing world in their search for the means to build healthier, more equitable, and more prosperous societies.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Caribbean Development Bank (CDB)
http://www.caribank.org/
The Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) aims to assist Caribbean nations to promote broad-based economic growth, inclusive social development, good governance, and regional cooperation and integration. The CDB supports the Millennium Development Goals for the Caribbean region. It disburses less than US$150 million per year, and thus CDB is one of the world’s smallest multilateral development banks. The CDB’s program areas include health, education, physical infrastructure, disaster risk management, and enterprise development. Be sure to investigate the Basic Needs Trust Fund and the Special Development Fund.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Central and Eastern Europe-Focused Grantmakers
http://fdncenter.org/pnd/specialissues/item.jhtml?id=3000057
A compilation of Africa-focused grantmakers compiled by the Foundation Center in Philanthropy News Digest, March 27, 2001. Includes: Civic Education Project, Microfinance

Charities Aid Foundation (CAF)
http://www.cafonline.org/
CharityNet.org was absorbed by the Charities Aid Foundation in 2007. Although CAF focuses on the United Kingdom, CAF International has offices around the world including : CAFAmerica, CAF Australia, Bulgarian CAF, CAF India, CAF Russia, CAF Southern Africa, and IDIS (Brazil).

Charity Village
http://www.charityvillage.com/
Contains links to Canadian foundations and a directory of nonprofits. The site links visitors to news, career opportunities, listservs, newsgroups and other resources. The list of foundations located in Canada even includes some family foundations.

Coca-Cola Foundation
http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/citizenship/foundation.html
Regional and Local Foundations : http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/citizenship/foundation_local.html
Along with information on the U.S. grants program, this site includes information about Coca-Cola’s International giving programs in Africa, Eurasia, the European Union, Latin America, North America, and the Pacific.

Colombian-American Community Foundation
http://www.synergos.org/globalgivingmatters/features/0309cacf.htm
This new foundation is striving to create a mechanism to enable Colombians living overseas to support the substantial, but generally financially strapped, Colombian civil society.

The Commonwealth Foundation
http://www.commonwealthfoundation.com/
This British foundation based in London serves as an umbrella to nongovernmental organizations in 51 Commonwealth countries, from Antigua and Canada to Zimbabwe. The Foundation’s special interests include: the eradication of poverty, rural development, health, non-formal education, community enterprise, women in development, disability and the arts and culture. Emphasis is on supporting non-governmental organizations, professional associations, arts and culture, and travel grants.

Cottonwood Foundation
http://www.cottonwoodfdn.org
Cottonwood Foundation is a tax-exempt charitable organization, run entirely by volunteers and with no paid staff, that provides small grants to grassroots organizations worldwide that are working for a sustainable future. Cottonwood awards grants to organizations that combine all of the following: protecting the environment, promoting cultural diversity, empowering people to meet their basic needs, and relying on volunteers. Support of such groups makes it possible to really make a difference in creating a better world.

Deutsches Spendeninstitut Krefeld
http://www.dsk.de/
Home page of the German Charities Institute. Includes 31,000 pages on charity, philanthropy, volunteering, and more, with a directory of over 5,200 German charities and other organizations, such as the German Fundraising Workshop, the German Foundation Documentation Center, and others. Check Contents page first. Additional material is provided on email groups, international links, hints for donors, and current updates. Some information available in English, but mostly in German.

Development Bank of Latin America
http://www.caf.com/es
Corporacion Andina de Fomento (CAF) is a multilateral financial institution that mobilizes resources from international markets to Latin America, in order to provide multiple banking services to both public and private clients of its shareholder countries. The Institution is committed to sustainable development and regional integration. Established in 1970, in Caracas, Venezuela, it has country offices in Buenos Aires, La Paz, Brasilia, Bogota, Quito, Madrid and Lima. Its shareholders are: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Spain, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela, and 15 private banks in the region. CAF is the main source of multilateral financing of the Andean region, with approvals that amount to USD 18,423 million during the past five years. Likewise, during the last five years, the Institution has strengthened its presence in Latin America, particularly in projects that contribute to regional integration. CAF’s main programmatic area is the development and improvement of physical infrastructure — especially for transport, energy, and water. As CAF has grown, it has added a wider mix of social and environmental activities into its portfolio. It created a Social and Environmental Development division in 2004. CAF has an Environment Unit for projects in biodiversity conservation, bio-trade, biotechnology, and international negotiations related to environment, e.g., climate change. Note: click on the English version if you can’t read Spanish.

Development Gateway Foundation
http://www.developmentgateway.org/
The Development Gateway is an independent not-for-profit organization. It was conceived by World Bank President James Wolfensohn and initially developed in the World Bank. Operations began in July 2001. Intended as a mechanism for developing countries to acquire information and forge partnerships.

Directory of African Foundations 2008 (book)
This comprehensive new directory lists every major national and international foundations, NGOs and other charitable and grant-making organizations located throughout Africa. All of the major established foundations and NGOs are included, as well as some of the less well-known grant-making organizations. Presenting names and contact details for hundreds of institutions, this new edition is the most comprehensive and up to date information on this growing sector.

The Eurasia Foundation
http://www.eurasia.org/
The Eurasia Foundation is a privately managed grant making organization dedicated to funding programs that build democratic and free market institutions in the twelve New Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union — Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan. Through its network of offices, the Eurasia Foundation currently awards approximately 1,000 grants worth over $20 million on an annual basis. Field offices are responsible for awarding grants directly to NIS organizations. Averaging $20,000, these grants presently account for approximately 80% of the total grant dollars awarded by the Foundation. For more information, contact the Eurasia Foundation, 1350 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20036; E-mail: eurasia@eurasia.org; telephone: (202) 234-7370.

Europe : Funding Sources
http://www.tgci.com/europe
Selected web links provided by the Grantsmanship Center.

European Foundation Centre
http://www.efc.be/
The European Foundation Centre (EFC) promotes and underpins the work of foundations and corporate funders active in and with Europe. Established in 1989 by seven of Europe’s leading foundations, the EFC today has a membership of over 160 independent funders and serves a further 7,000 organisations linked through networking centres in thirty-five countries across Europe.

Feed the Minds
http://www.feedtheminds.org/
Feed the Minds is a Christian communication charity with a difference! It brings books and literacy materials to the poorest countries of the world, yet it does not produce any materials itself. Instead, it gives grants to local publishers to produce books in their own language to meet the precise needs of the people. Sponsored by donors in Britain and Ireland.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Finish Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Department for International Development Cooperation
http://global.finland.fi/Public/
Note: select English.
Development policy aims according to Finland’s Policy on Relations with Developing Countries
Promotion of global security
Reduction of widespread poverty
Promotion of human rights and democracy
Prevention of global environmental problems
Promotion of economic dialogue
Long-term partner countries include Mozambique, Vietnam, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Nepal, Kenya, Nicaragua, Zambia, Egypt, Namibia and Peru.

Food Gardens Foundation (South Africa)
http://www.cityfarmer.org/s.africa.html#S.Africa
In 1977 Joy Niland and Pauline Raphaely, two suburban South Africans, founded the Food Gardens Foundation as a way to introduce low-cost (or even no-cost) methods of “restoring life and fertility to poor soil” and, most important, growing food, to families in the impoverished black township of Soweto. More than 20 years later, Foundation projects operate in rural and urban areas throughout Southern Africa. To learn how Niland and Raphaely got started, built bridges into communities that normally regard outsiders with mistrust, and what FGF looks like today, visit this web page.

Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Foundation
http://www.fxbfoundation.org/
The Countess Albina du Boisrouvray, together with her family and some of Francois’ friends, founded the Foundation in memory of her only child, Francois-Xavier Bagnoud, a helicopter pilot killed in a 1986 crash at the age of 24 on a flying mission in Mali, West Africa, during the Paris-Dakar road race.
Independant of the other philanthropic activities of the Foundation, the Association Francois-Xavier Bagnoud is involved in more than two dozen initiatives involving children’s rights, health and human rights, and pediatric HIV/AIDS in 17 countries. The Association’s operations are independent of the Foundation and require co-financing from other sources.

Gates Foundation (Bill & Melinda)
http://www.glf.org/default.htm
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation places a major focus on helping to improve people’s lives through health and learning. We will continue to look for strategic opportunities to extend the benefits of modern science and technology to people around the world, especially where poverty serves as an obstacle to participating in these benefits.

German Foundations Index
http://www.stiftungsindex.de/deutschland.htm
Stiftungen in Deutschland provides over 330 links to various German foundations. In german, so you may have to resort to a translation engine like FreeTranslation.com
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Glimmer of Hope
http://www.aglimmerofhope.org/
A Glimmer of Hope is a global, private charitable foundation. We seek to offer a Glimmer of Hope where it is needed most, and to help relieve some of the pain and suffering on the planet.

Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis
http://www.theglobalfund.org/en/
The purpose of the Fund is to attract, manage and disburse additional resources through a new public-private partnership that will make a sustainable and significant contribution to the reduction of infections, illness and death, thereby mitigating the impact caused by HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria in countries in need, and contributing to poverty reduction as part of the Millenium Development goals.)

Global Greengrants Fund
http://www.greengrants.org/
Our grants fund grassroots action in some of the world’s most despoiled and impoverished places. Grassroots groups are key to solving intractable problems and halting cycles of poverty, powerlessness and environmental destruction. Our grants offer hope and tap the energy of communities where other sources of support are unavailable. There is no better investment than supporting passionate people with great ideas.

GlobalPhilanthropy.CA
http://www.globalphilanthropy.ca/
GlobalPhilanthropy.ca assists Canadian individuals, non-profits and charities to conduct foreign activities including international development, humanitarian assistance, and education and to understand the legal, ethical and practical issues that they face. As well GlobalPhilanthropy.ca will also provide insights to foreign charities interested in fundraising in Canada, especially those involved with international development and humanitarian assistance activities outside of Canada.

Good 360
http://good360.org/
Good 360, formerly Gifts In Kind International, is the world leader in product philanthropy and the 3rd largest product and service philanthropic provider in the United States.

Grant Agency of the Czech Republic
http://www.cuni.cz/gacr/menueng.htm
The Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (GACR) was established in April 1993 by the Czech law No. 300/1992 as an independent institution that should promote progress over the whole range of scientific and technological development in the Czech Republic. Grants are provided to all kinds of Czech state and private research and development institutions and to private persons who are Czech citizens and reside permanently in the Czech Republic. Foreign private persons and institutions can cooperate in work on the grant projects.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Grants for Individuals (United Kingdom)
http://www.grantsforindividuals.org.uk/Default.aspx
Directory of Social Change’s Grants for Individuals website contains details of over 3,500 trusts operating both nationally and locally. These trusts collectively have 362 pounds million available each year. Aims to include all publicly-registered charities which give at least 500 pounds a year to individuals, although most give much more than this.

Grantsmanship Center
International Grantmakers
http://www.tgci.com/international-funding-sources
Grantmakers are sorted into six major areas:
Africa
Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and Pacific Islands
Canada
Central America, Caribbean, and South America
Europe
Middle East

Guide Annuaire des fondations et des association: GAFA
5th edition, 1997. Vincennes : Editions SA2, 1997. Main Library Reference Funding Center HD2769.2 .F8 G8
A directory of nonprofit associations in France.

Henry J. Kaiser Foundation
http://www.kff.org/
The Foundation’s work is focused on four main areas: health policy, reproductive health, HIV policy, and health and development in South Africa. The Foundation also maintains a special interest in health policy and innovation in its home state of California.

InterAmerican Development Bank
http://www.iadb.org/
Web site is available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, and French. Describes the activities and projects of the IDB. Site provides information about private sector funding for investments and other business activity in Latin America and the Caribbean. Like the other development banks, the IDB does not count grant-making with civil society as among its major objectives. However, the IDB and its related Multilateral Investment Fund finance a number of grants for micro and small businesses.

International Community Foundation
http://www.icfdn.org/
Established in 1990, International Community Foundation is a public charity working to foster lasting philanthropy to benefit under-served communities in Mexico and Latin America. With over 70% of International Community Foundation’s recent grantmaking benefiting charitable causes along the Baja California peninsula, International Community Foundation is committed to assisting US donors with charitable giving needs internationally. For U.S donors, International Community Foundation provides all the traditional advantages associated with a public charity including tax benefits, savings on administrative costs, assurances that one’s wishes will be followed after their lifetime, as well as the opportunity for individuals and families to actively participate in supporting charitable causes. Depending on the needs and interests of individual donors, International Community Foundation undertakes research on specific programs and geographic areas; obtains detailed information about potential grantees; facilitates site visits; fulfills required due diligence on projects receiving grants; and provides timely progress and financial reports to donors. For individuals wishing to make a difference in Baja California or anywhere else in Mexico, the International Community Foundation also offers a reliable and efficient tax deductible vehicle without being subject to the restrictions set forth in the 1994 U.S.-Mexico Tax Treaty which stipulates that tax-deductible individual giving in Mexico be limited to one’s Mexican-sourced income.

International Finance Corporation
http://www.ifc.org/
In recent years, the IFC has tailored its activities increasingly to the needs of individual countries and intensified efforts to reach new countries, markets, and sectors where the development needs are greatest. This diversification strategy has been effective, with IFC approving pioneering investments in 8 member countries during FY97. IFC is now working in more countries, in a broader range of sectors, and with more far-reaching development impact than ever before. Advisory services and technical assistance continue to grow in importance as an integral part of IFC’s program, contributing significantly to the development process.

The International Foundation Directory (Book)
London : Europa Publications Limited. Reference Funding (1 East) Center HV7 .I56
The 2010 or 19th edition covers approximately 2500 foundations and related organizations located in 108 different countries. Typical entries include the name and address of the organization, date founded, history and description of activities, financial data, and names of officers. Also includes introductory essays on A Brief History of Foundations from an international viewpoint; Foundations and the Third Sector in Europe — An Overview; Globalization and Foundations; and A Journey without Borders — Researching and Applying to Foundations. Earlier editions also available.

International Fund Raising for Not-for-Profits : A Country by Country Profile (Book).
Assesses the potential for fundraising in 18 countries. Outlines legal and taxation issues in each nation. Authors from respective countries examine the state of philanthropy in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Estonia, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Each country’s profile includes information on its philanthropic history and economic place in the world; its legal and tax systems; its corporate, foundation, and individual giving, providing statistics on the latter and rankings of the top grant-making institutions when available; and its commonly accepted fund-raising practices. Each chapter also contains a bibliography and addresses of organizations that are resources for fund raisers. [Fund raising – directories; Nonprofit organizations – directories]

International Grantmaking: A Report on U.S. Foundation Trends (Book).
Loren Renz. The Foundation Center in cooperating with the Council on Foundations. New York, N.Y. : Foundation Center, 1997. 241pp. Main Library Stacks HV97 .A3 I57 1997

International Grantmaking II : an Update on U.S. Foundation Trends (Book)
Loren Renz, Josefina Samson-Atienza ; contributor, Steven Lawrence. [New York, NY] : Foundation Center, c2000. 111pp. Main Library Stacks HV90 .I58 2000

International Grantmaking : A Report on U.S. Foundation Trends III (Book).
Loren Renz. New York, N.Y. : Foundation Center, 2004. 3d edition 97pp. Main Library Reference Funding Center (1, East) HV90 I58 2004
Prepared in cooperation with the Council on Foundations as an update to the 2000 International Grantmaking II study, this report examines perspectives on the post-9/11 funding climate and the current outlook for the field based on a 2004 survey of more than 60 leading U.S. international grantmakers. It also documents trends in international giving based on the grants of over 600 larger U.S. foundations. In particular, the study analyzes shifts in giving priorities, countries/regions targeted for support, and the impact of new large funders.

International Grantmaking : For International Visitors
http://www.foundationcenter.org/getstarted/international/
For International Visitors is designed to help people visiting the Foundation Center Web site from countries outside the United States, and to help people seeking information on international grantmaking by U.S. foundations. The Foundation Center does not track information on charitable organizations located outside the U.S. Similar organizations to the Foundation Center exist in Canada, Europe, and in other locations, and we’ve gathered links to various other philanthropic organizations in our links to nonprofit resources.

International Organizations Funding Directory (Book)
London: Europa, 2004. 1st edition, 484pp. Main Library Reference (1 East) Funding Center HD75.8 .I58
This title deals with the funding of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) by international organizations, and the joint projects undertaken by the two. The International Organizations Funding Directory is an invaluable guide to the booming third sector, as well as a record of the undertakings of the major international organizations.
Each major international organization is profiled in its own chapter, where its subordinate sections, institutions, departments and directorates will feature, along with the projects they run in partnership with important local, national or international NGOs.
Projects included are those run in collaboration with local, national or international NGOs, which are influential on a national or international scale.
Projects are included in any area of NGO activity, including: development aid; rural development; environment and conservation; women’s empowerment; civil society promotion; medicine and health; culture and art; economic reform; education and human rights.

Izumi Foundation
http://www.izumi.org/
The primary goal of the Foundation is to support efforts that will reduce the burden of infectious diseases in developing and low-income countries. The Foundation’s geographic focus includes the following countries in Sub-Saharan Africa: Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. The Foundation also funds in these countries in Central and South America: Bolivia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay and Peru. No support for medical research or direct grants to individuals.

Japan Foundation Center
http://www.jfc.or.jp/eibun/e_index.html
A private foundation established by executives of private grant-making foundations in Japan (1) to provide authoritative information on foundations in Japan that award grants, prizes, or scholarships and (2) to publicize the social role and significance of the activities of private grant-making foundations to encourage the practice of philanthropy in Japan’s private sector. In recent years,the grant-making activities of private foundations have increased in Japan, and these activities now attract public attention. The grant-making activities of private foundations have not yet gained wide public recognition,however, because of the lack of publicly available information on these activities. The Japan Foundation Center therefore serves as a source of up-to-date information on grant-making foundations and their grant programs and makes this information available to grant seekers,grant makers,and the public at large. Be sure to check out the Japanese Foundation links.

Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
http://www.jica.go.jp/english/
Currently in Japan, various groups and organizations – the central government, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector – are providing assistance to support socioeconomic development in developing countries. Assistance in the form of funding and technical cooperation provided by the government is called official development assistance (ODA).

Kellogg Foundation
http://www.wkkf.org/
A non-profit, focuses to improve communities’ quality of life in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Southern Africa through the practical application of knowledge and resources. Funding is focused toward food systems and rural development; youth and education and higher education; and philanthropy and volunteerism. Within these focal areas, funding is also provided for leadership; information systems/technology; efforts to capitalize on diversity; and family, neighborhood, and community development programming.

Kiwanis International
http://www.kiwanis.org/
Describes some of the organization’s major fundraising campaigns and volunteer service projects.

Levi Strauss Foundation
http://www.levistrauss.com/about/foundations/levi-strauss-foundation
Consistent with the heritage and values of the company, the grantmaking programs of LS&CO. and the Levi Strauss Foundation focus on the urgent needs of communities around the world where our employees and our contractors’ employees live and work. For over 50 years, the Levi Strauss Foundation’s grantmaking has supported and led social change. Our strategic initiatives range from funding an organization that provides girls in underdeveloped regions of Pakistan access to education to providing resources for Mujeres en Desarrollo, a nonprofit organization in the Dominican Republic that motivates young people to change risky behavior by informing them about HIV/AIDS.

Limmat Foundation (Switzerland)
http://www.limmat.org/
The Foundation is active both in Switzerland and abroad, endeavoring to stimulate, encourage and support initiatives which serve the common good.

Lion’s Clubs International Foundation
http://www.lionsclubs.org/
Lions Clubs International Foundation (LCIF) is the charitable arm of Lions Clubs International (LCI). The foundation’s mission is to support the efforts of Lions clubs around the world in serving their local and global communities by funding humanitarian service projects. Last year alone, LCIF approved more than US$13.9 million in grants for Lions’ districts around the world.

Luso-American Development Foundation (Portugal)
http://www.flad.pt/?no=0000002
The Luso-American Development Foundation is a private, financially independent Portuguese institution. Its main goal is to contribute towards Portugal’s development by providing financial and strategic support for innovative projects by fostering cooperation between Portuguese and American civil society.

MacArthur Foundation (John D. & Catherine T.)
http://www.macfdn.org/
Most of the Foundation’s grantmaking will be carried out through two programs. The Program on Global Security and Sustainability will focus on issues of peace, population, environment, and human rights. The Program on Human and Community Development will support work in community development, the arts, economic opportunity, youth development, education, mental health, research and other areas.

Mexican Center for Philanthropy
http://www.cemefi.org/

Mexico, Central America, Caribbean, and South American Funding Sources
http://www.tgci.com/mexico-central-america-caribbean-and-south-america

Middle East Funding Sources
http://www.tgci.com/middle-east
Selected web links provided by the Grantsmanship Center.

Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
http://www.mott.org/
Through our Civil Society program, we fund non-governmental organizations in Central/Eastern Europe and South Africa.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

Nippon Foundation
http://www.nippon-foundation.or.jp/eng/
The Nippon Foundation is a private, non-profit organization that is committed to philanthropic activities around the world, primarily focusing on the alleviation of human suffering, the advancement of general well-being, and the promotion of world peace. Its activities transcend the boundaries of politics, ideology, religion and race. For more information, contact: webmaster@ps.nippon-foundation.or.jp

NonprofitExpert.com International Grantmakers
http://www.nonprofitexpert.com/international-grants/
Repeats a lot of entries from this list, but does offer an extensive collection of Canadian grantmakers.

Oak Foundation
http://www.oakfnd.org
Global social and environmental concerns . . . are the focus of the Oak Foundation. The Foundation is international in scope and is particularly interested in issues that impact the lives of the disadvantaged. During the calendar year 2000, the Foundation made grants to 84 nonprofit organizations headquartered in 21 countries. There is no deadline for applications and grants range from $25,000 to $2,000,000. For more information email: William R. Cotter, President, oak@oakfnd.org or visit the Foundation’s website. Source: Grants and Foundations Review, Oct. 2, 2001.

OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID)
http://www.ofid.org/
OFID’s key aim is to foster social and economic progress in the developing world through the provision of concessional financing for developing countries. OFID provides financial assistance in a number of ways, with the distribution between the different types of aid changing over time as conditions in recipient countries evolve and needs alter. The methods of funding include public sector loans for development projects and programs, balance of payments support and debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative; trade financing; support to private enterprises ; grants for technical assistance, food aid, research and humanitarian relief work; and contributing to the resources of other development organizations whose activities benefit developing countries.

Open Society Institute and Soros Foundation Network
http://www.soros.org/
National Foundations of the Soros network currently operate in 30 countries across Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Central Eurasia, South Africa, and Haiti. The national foundations develop their own programs in support of the mission and strategic goals established by their directors and staff to build open societies in their countries. These programs vary greatly in nature and urgency from country to country. Some foundations, such as Georgia and Haiti, began their programs in 1995, hiring staff, developing priorities, and awarding their first grants. Others, such as Hungary and Poland, have been in the forefront of the movement toward open society since before the revolutionary changes of 1989.

Oxfam International
http://www.oxfam.org/en/
Oxfam International is a confederation of 12 organizations working together with over 3,000 partners in more than 100 countries to find lasting solutions to poverty, suffering and injustice.

Peace Parks Foundation (South Africa)
http://www.peaceparks.org/
The South African newspaper Business Day recently reported that Anton Rupert — chairman of the South Africa-based Peace Parks Foundation (PPF), head of the huge Rembrandt conglomerate and a member of the Global Philanthropists Circle — was planning to donate the equivalent of a winning lottery ticket to create a huge “trans-frontier” national park bordering Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe. This project would give tourists access to an area currently restricted to hunters — and bordered with an electric fence — and generate jobs. Read about this initiative, and the general work of the foundation at this web site.

Philanthropy Australia
http://www.philanthropy.org.au/
Philanthropy Australia is the national association which represents Australia’s leading grantmaking Private, Family, Corporate and Community Trusts and Foundations. We encourage you to use this website as a launching pad into the community of philanthropy, making use of it as both a resource and networking tool. Both those new to the sector and those seeking the most up-to-date and exhaustive information will find this site invaluable.

Fideicomiso ProViVah (Mexico)
http://www.provivah.org
A nonprofit organization that has already built hundreds of homes using quality materials in areas that are well-located and have electricity and sanitation. ProViVah offers a model for home ownership that targets the nation’s poorest citizens.

Rockefeller Brothers Fund
http://www.rbf.org/
The Fund’s major objective is to improve the well-being of all people through support of efforts in the United States and abroad that contribute ideas, develop leaders, and encourage institutions in the transition to global interdependence. Its grantmaking aims to counter world trends of resource depletion, arms build-ups, protectionism, and isolation which now threaten to move human kind everywhere further away from cooperation, equitable trade and economic development, arms restraint, and conservation.

Rockefeller Foundation
http://www.rockfound.org/
The Rockefeller Foundation is a knowledge-based, global foundation with a commitment to enrich and sustain the lives and livelihoods of poor and excluded people throughout the world.

Ronald McDonald House Charities
http://www.rmhc.com/
Ronald McDonald House Charities launches its international Ronald McDonald Care Mobile program to bring free health care directly to children in underserved communities. Ronald McDonald House Charities also partners with the United States Surgeon General to increase awareness of teenage suicide prevention. Also, RMHC’s new global initiative involves partnering with Operation Smile and Interplast.

Schusterman Family Foundation (Charles and Lynn)
http://www.schusterman.org/
The Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation was established in 1987 to support programs that enhance Jewish life in the United States, Israel, and the former Soviet Union. The foundation also funds Oklahoma based, non-sectarian charitable groups that focus on education, children and community service.
Also listed under Grants for Nonprofits–Religion and Social Change

Small World Foundation
http://www.smallworld.org/
SWF is dedicated to providing reconstructive surgery and medical aid throughout the developing world for children and adults who have no access to proper health care or resources for treatment.

SOS-Kinderoff International
http://www.sos-childrensvillages.org/
We offer a whole range of support activities for homeless children to local communities in 132 countries and territories. Find out about the different types of projects and embark on a journey through the continents.

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
http://www.sida.se/
The Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation, Sida, is a government agency under the Ministry for Foreign Affairs. Sida’s goal is to contribute to making it possible for poor people to improve their living conditions. Is your Swedish rusty? Look for the English tab.

Terra Viva Grants
http://www.terravivagrants.org
An online directory of grant makers for “green” funding in the developing countries. The nonprofit service is new this year, and it will evolve and develop as time goes on. Already we have almost 300 profiles included, and they account for the bulk of the grant funding in the sectors and countries we identify. We include a convenient and searchable database to help users rapidly identify and compare grant makers.

Tibet Foundation
http://www.tibet-foundation.org/
The Tibet Foundation was established in 1985 with the aims of providing healthcare, education and social economic support for people of Tibetan origin, both those living in exile, and those living in Tibet itself. It provides facilities to create a greater awareness of Tibetan culture and works to ensure its preservation, also to make available the thoughts and ideas of His Holiness the Dalai Lam, spreading his message of peace and harmony.

Tinker Foundation
http://fdncenter.org/grantmaker/tinker/
The Tinker Foundation was created in 1959 by Dr. Edward Larocque Tinker. His lifelong interest in the Iberian tradition in the Old and New Worlds directed the Foundation’s overall focus on Latin America, Spain and Portugal. More recently the Foundation has included in its mandate the support of projects concerning Antarctica, a region of significant interest on an international scale.

United Children’s Fund
http://www.unchildren.org/
An international charity providing financial, humanitarian, and volunteer aid to some of the poorest women, men, and children in the remote villages of East Africa.

UK Department of International Development
http://www.dfid.gov.uk/

UK Fundraising
http://www.fundraising.co.uk/
UK Fundraising, published since 1994, is a business to business site for UK charity fundraisers and the fundraising industry. News updated daily, with links to courses, resources, book reviews, magazines, and more for those interested in fund raising in the United Kingdom. Gives examples of how the Internet has been used for fund raising activities, both in the U.K. and abroad.

United Nations Development Program (UNDP)
http://www.undp.org
The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) is among the world’s largest multilateral organizations for development assistance. It is present in all regions of the developing world. In each country office, the UNDP’s Resident Representative normally also serves to coordinate the activities of the UN system as a whole.
On its website, UNDP lists more than 90 countries which participate in the GEF-UNDP Small Grants Program. Currently, about 10 new countries are being added each year. NGOs and community-based organizations in these countries are invited to apply. Project proposals must satisfy the SGP Country Program Strategy, overseen by a National Steering Committee. Funding can be provided for community-based assessment and planning; pilot demonstrations; monitoring and analysis; and dissemination, networking, and policy dialogue.
To be eligible for the UNDP Equator Prize, initiatives must be located within the equatorial belt (23.5 degrees latitude North and South of the Equator) in a developing country. A list of eligible countries is found on UNDP’s website (dedicated section for Equatorial Initiative). Applicants may be community-based organizations; biodiversity-related businesses; indigenous groups; NGOs; and initiatives associated with a UNESCO World Heritage site or other biological reserve. Award recipients must be able to demonstrate impact; partnerships; sustainability; innovation and transferability; leadership and community empowerment; and gender equality and social cohesion.
Grant seekers should also explore UNDP’s in-country programs for possible grant opportunities.

The U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation
http://www.crdf.org
A private, charitable organization created in 1995 by the U.S. government in response to the declining state of science and engineering in the former states of the Soviet Union, has received grants totaling $12.5 million for the continuation and expansion of its Basic Research and Higher Education (BRHE) program. The new funds will allow the organization to continue its efforts to improve the research capabilities of Russian universities.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

U.S. Foundations: A Review of International Funding Priorities
This research report examines the funding priorities of U.S. foundations and overall trends in international giving. The study concludes that a wealth of information on foundation giving is available to assist those working in international development. January 25, 2000.

Virtual Foundation
http://www.virtualfoundation.org/
The Virtual Foundation is a unique online philanthropy program which supports grassroots initiatives around the world. Carefully screened, community improvement projects in the fields of environment, health and sustainable development are posted on our web site. They can be read and funded by online donors.

WelcomEurope.com
formerly called Eurofunding
http://www.welcomeurope.com
Provides partial access to a database covering funding opportunities available from European institutions such as: European Commission, EBRD, EIF, Council of Europe, etc. Full access requires a premium subscription.
(Last checked 07/22/15)

World Bank
http://www.worldbank.org/
The World Bank is a major source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries in all parts of the world. It is made up of two institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), and the International Development Association (IDA). The IBRD focuses on middle-income and creditworthy countries which are economically poor, while the IDA focuses only on the economically poorest countries. Together the IBRD and IDA provide credits, grants, and low-interest loans to finance all aspects of economic development. The World Bank’s aim is to build a climate for investment, employment, and sustainable growth. It is motivated by the Millennium Development Goals, with the central challenge of reducing global poverty.

Worldwide Initiative for Grantmaker Support (WINGS)
http://www.wingsweb.org/
A network of over 40 grantmaker support organisations around the world, which have joined together to create opportunities to learn from and support one another, develop modes of communication and collaboration and contribute to the strengthening of philanthropy worldwide. Sponsored by the Council of Foundations. Also provides an ever-expanding network of organizations participating in Wings, many of which give out funding or funding information.

 

Directory of International Donors Funding the Youth Sector

ASHOKA

www.ashoka.org

ASHOKA, which promotes social entrepreneurship, provides outstanding individuals with funding to grow and develop as social entrepreneurs. Social entrepreneurs tackle problems in all areas of need: the environment, health, learning, human rights, civic engagement, and economic development. Founded by Bill Drayton in the U.S. in 1980, ASHOKA has an annual budget that grew to US$30 million in 2006, from $50,000 at the time of its founding.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE: International

SOURCES OF FUNDS: Foundations, individuals, corporations and organizations, business entrepreneurs and their organizations, investments. ASHOKA does not accept funding from government entities.

FINANCIALS: 2006 US Dollars

Total Assets 53,920,209

Total Operational Expenditure 25,999,503

Youth Venture

Youth Venture, which is an ASHOKA initiative directed at young people, helps teams of people start new youth-led organizations. It invests in teams of young people to design and launch social ventures, through which they gain experience and contribute to positive social change. Venturers start businesses, civil society organizations, and informal programs that address all kinds of social issues, including poverty, health, the elderly, the environment, education, diversity issues, and the arts. Youth Venturers are networked globally through events and a special website, adding an international dimension to this project. Youth Venture offers teams of young people who are ready:

  • seed funding of up to US$1,000;
  • guidance, tools, and support;
  • mentors who provide advice and expertise;
  • a supportive network of fellow Youth Venturers;
  • identity as part of movement toward youth-led social change.

Youth Venture operates in the U.S., Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, India, South Africa, Thailand, and across Europe. The public information does not indicate how many Youth Venture grants have been made since the program began or in the current year.

GLOBAL YOUTH COALITION ON HIV/AIDS (GYCA)

www.youthaidscoalition.org/page/smallgrants

GYCA runs a small-grants program to help young leaders working on HIV to implement projects in their communities with the support of the American Jewish World Service. In 2008, the program made it possible for GYCA to assist ten young graduates of their e-courses to implement projects that address documented needs in their communities and to learn the basics of grant management and reporting. Projects included awareness raising about HIV/AIDS among young women in Pakistan and a voluntary counseling and testing campaign in a rural area in Rwanda, among a number of other initiatives. Ten additional grants of US$1,500 were made in 2009 and 2010. Applicants are young persons, members of GYCA, 29 years old or younger, who have completed at least one GYCA e-course, a training equivalent to a GYCA e-course related to leading a project, and a two-day planning and management session, or who have experience in leading a youth organization on HIV and AIDS issues. Projects address a documented need in the community; work with marginalized populations; have specific, measurable, and time-bound objectives; include a focus on gender equality; have indicators in place for monitoring and evaluation; take an evidence-based and human rights-based approach; and are sustainable after the funding period ends. GYCA favors applicants who reside in a developing country where funding is not easily accessible; are living with HIV or belong to a marginalized group; are connected with a local, well-established NGO; and are committed to sharing their skills with their peers.

THE INTERNATIONAL YOUTH FOUNDATION (IYF)

www.iyfnet.org/section.cfm/5

The IYF is working in more than 70 countries and territories to improve the conditions and prospects of young people. Established in 1990 to bring worldwide resources to young people in need, IYF works with companies, foundations, and civic organizations to strengthen existing programs that are making a positive and lasting difference in young lives. IYF’s program activity is clustered around the following four issues, which form the core of IYF’s global youth initiatives:

  • Education to improve the quality of education and increase learning opportunities for young people—both in and out of school—through expanded access to information technology, innovative school reform, and instructional support for teachers.
  • Employability to improve young people’s employment, entrepreneurial, and personal skills as a way to build their capacity for and engagement in productive work.
  • Leadership and Engagement to inspire, support, and promote youth engagement and the role of young people as leaders of positive social change, as a way to foster a lifelong commitment to active citizenship.
  • Health Education and Awareness to prepare children and youth to lead healthy lives by providing them with the knowledge and personal skills needed to make informed and healthy choices.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE: International

SOURCES OF FUNDS: Foundations, governments and multilateral organizations, corporations and corporate foundations, individuals, interest and investment income.

The IYF relies heavily on corporate alliances to fund its operational programs and to ensure its grant-making budget. One of the IYF’s corporate partnerships, the Nokia Connections Program, provides an indication of the scale of the IYF’s operations. This program has provided funding for global youth development initiatives to strengthen the life skills of young people and prepare them for the future. Nokia has invested US$26 million in 24 countries and directly benefited more than 330,000 young people.

FINANCIALS: 2007 US Dollars

Total Assets 29,172,139

Total Expenditure 22,170,313

Total Program Expenditure 18,728,856

Number of grants 159

W.K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION

www.wkkf.org/Default.aspx?LanguageID=0

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, established in 1930, has a Youth and Education Grant-Making Program, which aims to improve learning outcomes for vulnerable children and youth. Kellogg supports new ideas about how to engage children and youth in learning and new ways to bring together community-based systems that promote learning.

Youth and Education Grant-Making Program

The purpose of the Youth and Education Program is to improve learning outcomes for vulnerable children and youth. The focus of general grant-making in Youth and Education is innovation. The Kellogg Foundation supports new ideas about how to engage children and youth in learning and new ways to bring together community-based systems that promote learning. Applicants may apply online on a rolling basis and must submit information about the following dimensions of their project:

  • how and why the project is innovative;
  • how the project engages community stakeholders to achieve the mission;
  • how the project is trying to impact or change the system;
  • how leadership strategies will be used to increase the impact of change efforts, to develop partnerships, and to align community aspirations with formal and informal institutions;
  • how the project is to be evaluated, how the team will learn from the project, and how the project’s achievements and issues will be communicated to other audiences.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE: U.S., Southern Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

SOURCES OF FUNDS: Kellogg Foundation Trust

FINANCIALS: 2008 US Dollars

Total Assets 8 billion

Total Program Expenditures: 306,596,409

New Program Commitments: 203,845,798

Total Grant Expenditures: 272,511,561

Total Number of New Commitments: 718

Total Active Grants: 2,932

WESTMINSTER FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY (WFD)

www.wfd.org/pages/standard.aspx?i_PageID=144

The WFD works to achieve sustainable political change in emerging democracies. It is an independent political foundation, sponsored by the United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Working with and through partner organizations, it seeks to strengthen the institutions of democracy, principally political parties, parliaments, and the range of institutions that make up civil society—nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), trade unions, free media, etc. WFD supports activities in the fields of local government, civic participation, women, youth, elections, rule of law, media, and trade unions. In many of the countries in which WFD is supporting democratic change, the key to progress is the talent and energy of the young people. WFD has supported numerous projects with young people, such as leadership training for young activists and projects encouraging youth to be engaged in political life and the development of their communities. Applications for funding are accepted on a rolling basis according to annually identified priorities for each country or region. Initial contact is made with the WFD staff member or team in the region, then funding opportunities are explored.

Two examples of youth-specific projects funded by WFD are:

The Liberal Democrats & Youth Training in Africa: The Liberal Democrats organized a youth training workshop for the Africa Liberal Network. This project brought together leaders of political youth groups from 13 African countries, ranging from Angola to Morocco and Tanzania in Lusaka, Zambia, and 14 political parties. The program focused on developing the participants’ campaign skills. The mix of governing and opposition parties, and parties from southern, east, and west Africa allowed an effective exchange of ideas and solutions. The use of African (as well as UK) trainers—both independent and from partner parties—made it possible to focus on capacity building and finding local solutions to local problems. Participants improved their skills in public speaking, communication, building and leading a team, working with the media, organizing election campaigns, presentation, and identifying issues. In a mock press conference, they quizzed fellow participants posing as journalists in the audience. This exercise allowed the delegates to practice some of the skills learned, and additional one-to-one interviews recorded on-camera and then reviewed let the participants see their progress.

Training Young Political Leaders in Moldova: Political party leadership practices in Moldova lack value-based standards for promoting individuals and ideas, making it difficult for young activists to participate fully in party activities, to make a contribution to the party, and steadily assume greater responsibility. Political leaders and elites are reluctant to share power, which has led to fragmentation of the political scene. Opportunities for young politicians are limited to basic campaign activities. WFD supported a project that provided youth members of Moldovan political parties with the ability to assert themselves within their organizations. It also aimed to strengthen political parties through empowering young party leaders and to promote a value-based and democratic party system in Moldova. Activities included leadership training sessions for young party members and civil society activists, as well as a summer school with a mock electoral campaign. The knowledge acquired by the participants enabled them to conduct follow-up activities within their parties. One activist conducted training for other youth members of her party, while another hosted a summer school for young activists from rural areas. Numerous participants were also subsequently promoted within their parties; some are now running as candidates in different elections, one has been appointed deputy chair of their party’s youth branch, and one non-party participant has joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE: Africa, Europe, Middle East, and North Africa

SOURCES OF FUNDS: WFD’s main source of income is the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, currently at the rate of £4.1 million per annum. It raises additional funding from other sources, such as the UK Department for International Development (DfID) and the UK Strategic Program Fund (formerly Global Opportunities Fund/GOF), to support its programs.

FINANCIALS: 2006–7 British Pounds Sterling

Total Expenditure on projects 3,187,318

 

 

The following section provides online sources of information that can help young people and their associations find funds for their projects. Many of these online information sources are not comprehensive; they include sources of information relevant for both specific regions and the international youth sector, as well as more general information about resources for civil society and NGOs. Not all of the sources listed are conceived as youth-specific information portals, and therefore they vary in user-friendliness for young people.

ANNA LINDH FOUNDATION, FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES DATABASE

www.euromedalex.org/funding/search

The Anna Lindh Foundation offers its partners and the general public easy access to various funding opportunities in the field of intercultural work in the Euro-med region through an online search engine covering international, private and non-private organizations; national agencies for development and cooperation; and EU institutions.

CHARITYVILLAGE

www.charityvillage.com/cv/main.asp

Charity Village is Canada’s online “one stop shop” for the nonprofit sector. It includes more than 3,500 pages of news, jobs, how-to articles, volunteer and event listings, educational opportunities, and information about resources available to the nonprofit sector in Canada and worldwide.

COMMUNITY OF SCIENCE, INC. (COS) FUNDING SEARCH ENGINE

https://login.cos.com/cgi-bin/account_login

COS is an online funding search engine that provides scientists and researchers at more than 1,300 universities, corporations, and government agencies worldwide to communicate, exchange information, find the people and technologies, and to access information about funding opportunities for scientific work. The COS interface allows the user to search for grants from a variety of national and international resources.

CSR EUROPE

www.csreurope.org

CSR Europe has more than 60 multinational corporations as members. The website is a source of information on corporate funding that targets young people and their initiatives.

EUROPEAN FOUNDATION CENTER (EFC)

www.efc.be

Established in 1989 by seven of Europe’s leading foundations, the EFC promotes and underpins the work of foundations and corporate funders active in and with Europe. As part of its mission to promote philanthropy in Europe, the EFC operates a number of projects and initiatives, including the Orpheus Program, a searchable database of over 650 funder profiles.

EUROPEAN YOUTH PORTAL

http://europa.eu/youth/

The European Youth Portal is the European gateway to citizenship and mobility for young people in Europe. The European Youth Portal offers European and national information of interest to young people who are living, learning and working in Europe. The portal gives information on 8 main themes, covers 31 countries and is available in 25 languages, including information about youth related funding opportunities (in Europe and worldwide). It also provides a gateway to other youth information portals: http://europa.eu/youth/portals_for_young_people/index_eu_en.html.

THE FOUNDATION CENTER

http://foundationcenter.org

Supported by close to 550 foundations, the Foundation Center is a national nonprofit service organization recognized US’s leading authority on organized philanthropy, connecting nonprofits and the grant makers supporting them to tools they can use and information they can trust. Its audiences include grantseekers, grant makers, researchers, policymakers, the media, and the general public. The Center maintains the most comprehensive database on U.S. grant makers and their grants; issues a wide variety of print, electronic, and online information resources; conducts and publishes research on trends in foundation growth, giving, and practice; and offers an array of free and affordable educational programs. Its youth specific spin-off is called Youth and Philanthropy: http://youth.foundationcenter.org.

FOUNDATIONS ONLINE

www.foundations.org/grantmakers.html

This is a directory by the Northern California (USA) Community Foundation of corporations and foundations that have their grant information and application process online. These are U.S.-based companies, but some may have international divisions, and may give to causes outside the U.S.

FUNDRAISING FOR (AND WITH) TECHNOLOGY

www.npower.org

This website includes general fundraising information, how to craft technology funding proposals, sample proposals, and profiles of potential givers (foundations and corporations). Also includes a variety of information on technology resources for nonprofits.

FUNDERS ONLINE

www.fundersonline.org

Funders Online is an initiative of the European Foundation Center (EFC) (www.efc.be/projects/orpheus/) and is a useful and easy-to-use web resource for youth and NGOs to determine which organizations and foundations provide funding for youth-related activities. The EFC promotes and supports the work of foundations and corporate funders in Europe.

GRANT MAKERS WITHOUT BORDERS (GW/OB)

www.internationaldonors.org

A collaboration of the International Working Group and the National Network of Grant Makers, Gw/oB works “to expand and enrich progressive international philanthropy” by providing free advice, alternative sources of information, and increased opportunities for communication among donors.

THE NGO CAFÉ BY THE GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH CENTER (GDRC)

http://gdrc.org/ngo/

The GDRC offers an easy-to-read primer about NGOs, what it means to be one, how they operate, etc. The basic objectives of the Café are to assist NGOs in enhancing and improving their programs and activities; to effect a better understanding of NGOs in general; and to enable NGOs to network at local, regional, and international levels.

RESOURCE ALLIANCE

www.resource-alliance.org

Resource Alliance (formerly known as the International Fundraising Group) seeks to enable people working in the voluntary sector throughout the world to mobilize and support local resources for their causes. They have conferences and fundraising workshops worldwide. They also sell The Worldwide Fundraiser’s Handbook: A Guide to Fundraising for Southern NGOs and Voluntary Organizations, by Michael Norton.

TECHNOLOGY GRANT NEWS

www.technologygrantnews.com

Technology Grant News has the latest grant announcements by tech funders, government and trade associations for technology and nontechnology-related initiatives for nonprofits, social service providers, towns and cities, and schools and universities. Grants are listed by such areas as technology funders teaching the math and science of technology, stepping stones to technology for children with disabilities, the digital divide, women, after-school programs, economic development, literacy, environment, conservation, and partnership funding.

WORLD INITIATIVES FOR GRANT-MAKER SUPPORT

www.wingsweb.org

A project of the U.S.-based Council on Foundations, World Initiatives for Grant-Maker Support is a network of more than 40 grant-maker support organizations devoted to strengthening philanthropy around the globe.

FUNDSFORNGOS

www.fundsforngos.org

fundsforngos.org is an online initiative, working for the sustainability of NGOs by increasing their access to donors, resources and skills. It uses online technologies (e.g. newsletters) to spread knowledge about organizational sustainability, promote creative ideas for long-term generation of institutional funds for development interventions, improve professional efforts in resource mobilization and advocate for increased allocation of donor resources for building the skills and capacities of NGOs.

 

  Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry

Common Fund for Commodities

Grants and loans for the production and marketing of agricultural and natural resource commodities

The Common Fund for Commodities (CFC) is an inter-governmental financial institution which supports developing countries to improve and diversify their production and trade of commodities.

Projects supported by CFC aim to achieve poverty alleviation through the socioeconomic development of commodity producers and processors.  CFC’s projects are intended to favor commodity producers in the least-developed countries.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Support for commodity production and marketing. CFC’s projects cover a wide range of commodities, with about 40 in the agricultural sector (broadly defined) and three in minerals.

The Fund supports a broad range of partners.  Recipients of past CFC grants include research organizations in the agricultural and minerals sectors; government agencies for agriculture, fisheries, and forests; industry associations (e.g., for coffee, sugar, tea, cocoa, cotton, dairy, timber, minerals, etc.); and foundations and NGOs at regional, national, and local levels. CFC also collaborates financially with a number of United Nations agencies.

 

APPLICATION: The CFC announces calls for proposals.  Potential applicants study the submission guidelines.

Applications are presented in two stages. The initial application describes the proposed intervention, details about the organization submitting the proposal, and supporting information.  The CFC invites detailed proposals from successful applicants in the first stage.

Applicants must be able to provide matching resources (cash and in-kind) equal to at least half of the project costs.

The CFC posts calendar deadlines for applications. .

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The developing country member states of the CFC are identified below.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Thailand

East Asia: China, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Russia

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Kuwait, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela

CFC’s annual reports include brief profiles of projects approved during recent years.

The world’s principal International Commodity Bodies (ICBs) are the following:

Grant seekers who focus on specific commodities or sectors may find it worthwhile to explore information and potential contacts with these ICBs.

The headquarters of the CFC are located in Amsterdam. The Secretariat is small, and CFC has no regional offices. CFC’s website provides complete contact information.

Contact info:

Address

Rietlandpark 301

1019 DW Amsterdam, the Netherlands

P.O. Box 74656

1070 BR Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Telephone and E-Mail

Telephone: +31 20 5754949

Fax: +31 20 6760231

E-mail: managing.director@common-fund.org

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research

Grants for research and capacity building in agriculture and natural resources in the developing world

The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) is the world’s largest global partnership for research in agriculture and natural resources for the benefit of the developing world.

The CGIAR’s organizational network comprises 15 research centers, many cross-cutting programs, and hundreds of institutional partners.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS)The CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security addresses the increasing challenge of global warming and declining food security on agricultural practices, policies and measures through a strategic collaboration with CGIAR and Future Earth. Research at CCAFS covers adaptation, mitigation, climate services and policy support.  The geographical scope is Latin America, West Africa, East Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. CCAFS is not a grant-making organization, but it posts grant opportunities at its webpage for “Careers and Calls.”

 

2 — African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD). With financial support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other donors, AWARD is a fellowship and mentoring program of the CGIAR’s Gender and Diversity Program to strengthen the capacity of women agricultural scientists in sub-Saharan Africa.

The program covers the expenses of training, travel, and the other activities of each participating fellow.

APPLICATION:  AWARD announces an annual call for applications. Each call specifies the eligible countries; eligible agricultural disciplines; educational requirements; closing date for applications; and additional supporting information.

Note: The program is not calling for applications while AWARD seeks new funding.

About the program, and how to apply

In the past, the CGIAR has funded other grant-making initiatives in its system of 15 research centers, and sometimes by one or more multi-center partnerships. These grant-making initiatives can be challenging to identify in the CGIAR’s decentralized management framework.

The CGIAR has been restructuring its organization, governance, funding mechanisms, and partnership arrangements. As these changes continue to take place, grant seekers should monitor for new funding programs that could open to external competition.

Address
CGIAR System Management Office
1000, Avenue Agropolis
F-34394 Montpellier cedex 5

Telephone and E-mail

Tel: + 33 4 67 04 7575

Email:contact@cgiar.org

Fax :+33 4 67 04 75 83
European Cooperation — Maritime Affairs and Fisheries

Grants for programs of fisheries management and marine protection in Europe and internationally.

 

The EC’s Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (DG MARE) coordinates the administration of the EU’s Integrated Maritime Policy, and its Common Fisheries Policy. To these ends, the EU works with international partners and beneficiaries.

The EU’s Maritime Policy addresses transport, fisheries, customs, and marine environmental protection — with emphasis on Europe’s sea basins. The Fisheries Policy focuses on how to make European and international fisheries more sustainable through policies, laws, economic incentives, alternative production (aquaculture), and marine science.

DG MARE funds competitive tenders and grants in support of its policy objectives. Several programs and projects take a multi-country approach.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Grants for fisheries and maritime affairs. DG MARE publishes annual work programs for grants and procurement.

  • Grants include the EU’s annual financial support for international fisheries bodies. Grants are awarded to international organizations, e.g., the FAO; the world’s regional fisheries councils and advisory committees; and secretariats of international fisheries agreements.
  • Other types of grants support projects of technical assistance in fisheries monitoring and management at the level of sea basins through cross-border collaboration and pilot projects. Grants in DG MARE range from less than €50 thousand to more than €2 million.

 

APPLICATION: For grants that are not decided administratively, DG MARE posts calls for proposals. Each call includes context and objectives, eligibility criteria, eligible costs, how and when to submit proposals and other supporting details.

Many grants are not offered competitively. DG MARE is able to award them on a non-competitive basis to organizations that have a de jure or de facto monopoly (i.e., exclusive expertise and/or competence), and to organizations named in basic acts of EU legislation. These two categories assimilate a high proportion of the total available funding.

The EU financially supports its fishing industry and coastal communities through the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, managed by authorities in each EU country. Each country is allowed to subsidize its national fishing industry if it does not distort competition between EU countries.

DG MARE posts news and events that provide considerable basic information about fisheries and maritime issues in Europe and internationally.

Contact provides complete information.

 

Contact info:

Address

Rue Joseph II 99 (main entrance)
1000 BRUSSELS.

EUROPEAN COMMISSION
Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries
B-1049 BRUSSELS
BELGIUM

Telephone & E-mail

Tel: +32 2 99 11 11

Fax: + (32) 2 299 30 40

 

 

 

 

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Grants in technical assistance for projects in agriculture, fisheries, and forestry in the developing world

Established in 1945, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is among the original agencies of the United Nations. Its mandate is to raise levels of nutrition, improve agricultural productivity, better the lives of rural populations, and contribute to the growth of the world economy.

FAO does this by sharing expertise in agricultural and rural policy; by serving as a forum for global issues in agriculture, fisheries, forestry, and environment; and by sponsoring field projects to improve the management of agriculture and natural resources in the developing countries.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Technical Cooperation Program (TCP). FAO’s principal source of grants is its Technical Cooperation Program. The TCP operates in all of the world’s developing regions, with emphasis on the neediest countries.

The purpose of the TCP is to support projects which address specific problems in agriculture, fisheries and aquaculture, and forestry. Additionally, TCP sets aside some of its funding for emergency projects, e.g., control of insect and disease outbreaks affecting food production.

The TCP is accessible in all FAO member countries, with preference for the low-income food-deficit countries, together with other categories of need.

The maximum grant size is US$500 thousand over two years.

APPLICATION: The TCP Manual contains guidelines for formulation, approval, implementation, and revision of TCP projects.

Requests to the TCP normally are made by government agencies for agriculture, forestry, fisheries, or rural development more broadly. Projects proposed by NGOs, foundations, cooperatives, etc., are also eligible if they are endorsed by the government authorities

In countries where FAO has an accredited Representative, requests for funding through the TCP are normally channeled through that office. In countries in which there is no Representative, FAO’s regional and sub-regional offices assume this responsibility.

2 — FLEGT Program. In coordination with the European Union, FAO implements the “Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade Support Program” (FLEGT). The program makes grants to address thematic areas in the FLEGT Program for 2015-2020 (its third phase). The objectives are:

  • To stop illegal logging;
  • To promote trade in legal timber products; and
  • To contribute to sustainable forest management and poverty reduction.

“VPA countries” have negotiated or are in negotiation stages of Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPA) with the European Union.  FLEGT also supports non-VPA countries in the same issues to curb illegal logging, improve forest governance, and promote trade of legally-sourced timber.

Eligibility for grants is open to government institutions, civil society organizations, and private sector organizations in the program’s eligible countries.

In calls for proposals, grants are up to €100 thousand. For direct assistance, grants are up to €50 thousand.

APPLICATION:  FLEGT operates through calls for proposals, and also through direct assistance.

Calls for proposals are open to governments, civil society, and private-sector organizations.  FLEGT posts the calls, eligibility criteria, and application deadlines.

Direct assistance supports specific actions connected with implementing a national VPA strategy, such as provision of training and technical assistance. Direct assistance is available to governments and to private sector organizations, including small and medium enterprises that may find difficult to request assistance through calls for proposals.

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

FAO’s developing member countries are identified below.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Brunei, Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

FAO’s website is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.

FAO sponsors the Edouard Saouma Award for excellence in managing TCP projects. Eligible applicants are national and regional institutions which have managed a project funded by the TCP in the two years preceding the biennial call for nominations. The award winners receive cash prizes of US$25 thousand for the recipient institution.

FAO provides a directory of its worldwide offices.

 

 

Contact info:

 

Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00153 Rome, Italy

 

Telephone & E-mail
Tel:(+39) 06 57051
E-mail:FAO-HQ@fao.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology

Research grants in molecular biology and biotechnology, with application in fields that include agriculture and environment

Principal Office: International

The International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB) is part of the United Nations system. The ICGEB is dedicated to research and capacity building in life sciences for the benefit of developing countries.

The Center contributes advanced research and training in molecular biology and biotechnology in the basic sciences, human healthcare, industrial and agricultural biotechnology, and environmental bioremediation.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

ICGEB Research Grants. The ICGEB makes funding available through the Collaborative Research Program – ICGEB Research Grants. Grants support the creation of research facilities in promising institutes; promote training of young scientists; and develop new research programs of specific interest in participating countries. Grants support research in fields that include (among others):

  • Biomedicine;
  • Crop improvement;
  • Environmental protection and remediation; and
  • Biopharmaceuticals and biopesticide production.

Grantees are individuals who hold positions at universities and research institutes in ICGEB’s participating countries (i.e., Member States).

The research program includes a special category of grants to fund young researchers (through age 40) with an outstanding track record who have spent a minimum of two years abroad, and who have recently returned to an ICGEB Member State to establish their own independent laboratories.

Grants are up to €25 thousand per year for projects of up to three years.

APPLICATION:  ICGEB makes annual calls for grant proposals. The website posts guidelines, application forms, and a calendar deadline for receiving proposals.

Each Member State in ICGEB may submit up to three standard research proposals, and up to two early-career return applications, per funding round. Proposals are prepared and submitted in English. Each proposal needs to be endorsed by the applicant’s institution, and by ICGEB’s Liaison Officer in the participating country.

About ICGEB’s research grants, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The following developing countries are Member States in ICGEB, using the regional geographic structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Malaysia, Vietnam

East Asia: China

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Turkey

Eastern Europe and Russia: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia,

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates

Sub-Saharan Africa: Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Eritrea, Kenya, Liberia, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania

Latin America and Caribbean: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

ICGEB provides data about its cumulative grant making since 1988.

ICGEB offers fellowships (pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and short-term) for scientists in member countries. The fellowships are in collaboration with participating universities and ICGEB’s laboratories in Italy, India, and South Africa.

ICGEB provides complete information about its facilities in Trieste (international headquarters), New Delhi, and Cape Town.

The website explains how research institutions in ICGEB’s member countries can apply to become Affiliated Centers.

Last Profile Review

November 2016

Contact info:

Address
CRP-ICGEB Research Grants Unit,

ICGEB, Padriciano 99,

34149 Trieste – Italy

Telephone and E-mail
Tel: +39-040-3757382

Fax: +39-040-226555

Email: crp@icgeb.org

 

 

International Fund for Agricultural Development

Loans and grants for research and capacity building in agriculture and natural resources

Principal Office: International

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is a specialized agency of the United Nations, established as an international financial institution.

IFAD provides grants and low-interest loans in support of pro-poor agriculture and management of natural resources in the developing world. Loans are provided to IFAD’s developing member states on terms and conditions which vary according to the country’s per capita income. Grants strengthen technical and institutional capacities linked to agriculture and rural development.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Grants for research and technical assistance. IFAD makes grants for research and capacity building in agriculture, natural resources, and related strategies to address rural poverty. It organizes its grants into those which it makes available at the country level, and those at regional and global levels.

IFAD’s grant recipients include the centers of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR); intergovernmental organizations in which IFAD’s member states participate; national governments; civil society organizations; and private-sector entities. Only organizations which are based in or work in IFAD’s member states are eligible for grants.

Many of the large grants support international agricultural research in networks or at regional scales, as well as other international efforts for rural development. Larger grants are mainly in the range of US$0.5 million to US$2 million.

IFAD’s operations in a country are framed by that country’s Country Strategic Opportunities Program (COSOP). Project concepts and subsequent project design must be consistent with the COSOP.

Most small grants (<US$500 thousand) focus on capacity building, awareness raising, knowledge networks, policy advocacy, and rural innovation.

APPLICATION: Grant seekers should contact IFAD’s country program managers to explore funding possibilities.

About the program, and how to apply

2 — Indigenous Peoples Assistance Facility (IPAF). The Indigenous Peoples Assistance Facility (IPAF) aims  to strengthen indigenous peoples’ communities and their organizations by financing small-projects which foster self-driven development.

Grants range from US$20 thousand to US$50 thousand.

APPLICATION:  IPAF announces calls for proposals when funding is available.

About the program, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The following are IFAD’s developing member countries.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Moldova, Macedonia

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Note: IFAD includes a few additional member states which are not recognized as countries in the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Comments

Contact Us provides information for IFAD’s headquarters in Rome, and for IFAD’s country offices worldwide.

Address

International Fund for Agricultural Development
Via Paolo di Dono, 44
00142 Rome, Italy.

Telephone and E-mail
Tel: +39-0654591
Fax: +39-065043463

E-mail: ifad@ifad.org

International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

Grants to strengthen capacity in the developing countries for actions to conserve and manage plant genetic resources in agriculture

The objectives of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) are to conserve and sustain plant genetic resources for food and agriculture, and to promote fair and equitable sharing of the benefits derived from their use.

The countries which participate in the Treaty exchange and share genetic material and information for most of the world’s most important food crops. The Treaty aims to reduce the time and expense to negotiate individual bilateral agreements, and to promote capacity building and technology transfer in international crop research.

The Treaty also expresses a commitment to protect the rights of farmers and indigenous communities that have traditional knowledge of plant resources.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Benefit-Sharing Fund. The Treaty established a Benefit-Sharing Fund, which makes grants to support the implementation of the Treaty in developing countries. Grants are for information exchange, technology transfer, and capacity building in topics of plant genetic diversity – with a particular interest in the risks to agriculture posed by climate change. The scope of the Fund also includes on-farm conservation and management of plant genetic resources, and sustainable use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture.

Eligibility for grants extends to government and non-government organizations in the developing countries that are contracting parties to the ITPGRFA. These organizations include gene banks, universities, research institutes, development NGOs, farmers’ organizations, regional and international organizations, and others.

APPLICATION:  The ITPGRFA announces calls for proposals every two years (in principle).

Each call for proposals defines a thematic focus within the broad scope covered by the Treaty. The application process has two stages. Pre-proposals are followed by invitations for full proposals from a subset of the pre-proposals.

About the grant-making process

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The contracting parties to the ITPGRFA include the following developing countries, applying the regional geographical framework of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Myanmar, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Tonga

East Asia: North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Turkey

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Montenegro, Serbia

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudia Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, St. Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

The Treaty’s website is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Potentially interested grant applicants may want to contact the Treaty’s national focal points for information and guidance.

The Secretariat of the ITPGRFA is hosted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome.  FAO provides contact information for the ITPGRFA Secretariat.

Address

FAO Headquarters
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla,
00153 Rome, Italy

Telephone and E-mail
Tel: +39) 06 570 53441

Telex: 610181 FAO
IFax: (+39) 06 570 56347

E-mail: pgrfa-treaty@fao.org

International Tropical Timber Organization

Grants and fellowships in support of tropical forest management, conservation, wood utilization, and forest products trade

Principal Office: International

The International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) is an inter-governmental organization to promote the conservation, sustainable management, and use and trade of tropical forest resources. Members are the world’s major producing countries and consuming countries of tropical timber.

ITTO works internationally on policies, guidelines, and demonstrations to promote sustainable forest management and forest conservation. It also collects, analyses, and disseminates data on the production and trade of tropical timber.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Grants for forest management, conservation, and forest products trade. ITTO makes grants for a range of projects in tropical forest management, conservation, wood utilization, and forest products trade. Funded projects at industrial and community levels include pilot and demonstration work, capacity building, and research and development.

Most of ITTO’s projects are submitted and implemented by national governments, often with partners that include conservation NGOs, universities, timber industry associations, community organizations, and others.

Pre-projects generally are funded at less than US$100 thousand.  Project grants normally range from US$100 thousand to US$1 million.

APPLICATION:   ITTO provides a Manual for Project Formulation (in English, French, and Spanish) which explains the details of the content, organization, and format of proposals. Grants are made through ITTO’s regular grants cycle, and more recently through the addition of thematic grant-making programs.

Proposals are submitted by ITTO’s member governments on behalf of themselves and/or other project implementing organizations. NGOs, universities, forest industry groups, community organizations, and other grant seekers coordinate their proposals with their respective ITTO government members.

About project funding, and the application process

 

2 — Fellowships for professional development. The Freezailah Fellowship Fund strengthens professional development and expertise in tropical forestry and related disciplines. Fellowships are mainly for short-term activities such as support of early and mid-career individuals in conferences, training courses, and study tours. Fellowships also can be used to prepare manuals and monographs, and to support post-graduate study.

The fellowship program is open to nationals of ITTO’s member countries, and they are awarded primarily to nationals of developing countries. The maximum fellowship grant is US$10 thousand.

APPLICATION:   ITTO supports two rounds of fellowship applications per year.  The website posts application guidelines, eligibility criteria, application forms (English, French, Spanish), and calendar deadlines.

About ITTO’s fellowships, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

ITTO’s members in developing countries are indicated below within the geographical structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory. All are considered timber-producing countries except China and Albania

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines

East Asia: China

South Asia: India

Eastern Europe and Russia:  Albania

Sub-Saharan Africa: Benin, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Dem Rep Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Mozambique, Togo

Latin America and Caribbean: Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Peru,  Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago 

Comments

ITTO’s website is available in English, French, Spanish, and Japanese.

Projects in ITTO are funded by voluntary contributions, mainly from its consumer member countries (Japan, Switzerland, USA, Norway, Netherlands, and others).

ITTO’s web page for Council and Committees announces pending proposals, project evaluations, and recent funding approvals.

ITTO provides contact information for its main office in Yokohama, Japan.

 

Contact info:

Address

International Tropical Timber Organization
International Organizations Center, 5th Floor
Pacifico-Yokohama 1-1-1, Minato-Mirai,
Nishi-ku, Yokohama, 220-0012 Japan

Telephone and E-mail

Tel : +81-45-223-1110
Fax : +81-45-223-1111
Email itto@itto.int

Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology

Grants for agricultural research in Latin America and the Caribbean

The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology (Fondo Regional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, FONTAGRO) is a consortium to promote agricultural research and technology in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Inter-American Development Bank and Inter-American Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture jointly provide legal and administrative support, including the resources of FONTAGRO’s Technical-Administrative Secretariat.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Research grants. Grant-funded projects in FONTAGRO support research in agricultural productivity, natural resources, innovations in agri-food chains, agricultural competitiveness, agricultural policies, and institutional strengthening. Many projects include aspects of environment and natural resources related to soil, water, climate change, and biodiversity.

Most grants are awarded to national agricultural research organizations of the FONTAGRO countries in collaboration with partners in the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), national universities and research institutes, and others.

FONTAGRO’s ordinary grants normally range from US$100 thousand to US$500 thousand for projects of up to four years.

APPLICATION:   FONTAGRO’s website posts announced calls for proposals, terms of reference, application guidelines, selection criteria, application forms, budget forms, and calendar deadlines.

Link to calls for proposals

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

FONTAGRO’s member countries are identified below.

Latin America and Caribbean: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Honduras,Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela

Note: Spain is also a member country.

Comments

FONTAGRO’s website is available in Spanish. Some parts of the site are available in English.

Member governments contribute payments to FONTAGRO, which is governed by a Board of these members. Additional capital for the Fund is provided through international donors and partners.

Grant seekers are able to consult a list of FONTAGRO’s previous grants. Since its inception in 1998, FONTAGRO has offered grants in most years.

FONTAGRO offers contact information for its Secretariat at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington.

 

Contact info:

 

Address & email

Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo
1300 New York Avenue NW, Stop W0908
Washington, DC 20577
Correo Electrónico: fontagro@iadb.org

 

 

Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture

Grants and fellowships in support of research, education, and training in agriculture and related disciplines in Southeast Asia

The mandate of the Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture  (SEARCA) is to meet contemporary development challenges, and to lead in enabling sustainable agricultural and rural development in Southeast Asia.

SEARCA offers a number of funding opportunities in education, training, and research.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Seed Fund for Research and Training (SFRT). The SFRT provides start-up funds for research projects in natural resources management and agricultural competitiveness. The program is open to nationals of Southeast Asia who have at least a four-year university degree, and who lack significant alternative funding support. The maximum grant is US$15 thousand for one year.

APPLICATION: Grant seekers consult application guidelines on SEARCA’s website. A proposal includes research objectives, methods, implementation details, budget, and qualifications of the researchers. Completed proposals are submitted to SEARCA according to an annual calendar deadline.

About the SFRT, and how to apply for funding

2 — Graduate Scholarships. SEARCA financially supports advanced studies leading to the MS and PhD degrees in agriculture, forestry, and related fields. Several universities in Southeast Asia participate in the program. Financial support covers stipend, tuition, international and domestic travel allowances, thesis/dissertation support, a book allowance, and health insurance.

APPLICATION: Application forms are posted on SEARCA’s website. Completed applications are submitted through the national Ministries of Education (or equivalent) in each Southeast Asian country, which coordinate with SEARCA according to a calendar schedule.

About scholarships, and how to apply

3 — Travel Grants. Travel grants support qualified professionals and social scientists (including graduate students) who work in agriculture and related disciplines to make professional presentations at international or national scientific conferences. Each travel grant provides a maximum of US$1,200.

APPLICATION:  Applicants send letters of request to SEARCA, which reviews them on a quarterly schedule.

About travel grants, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Vietnam

Note: Singapore, defined in the Terra Viva Grants Directory as a developed country, is also a member of SEARCA.

Comments

SEARCA is one of several regional centers established by the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) to promote cooperation in education, science, and culture in the Southeast Asian region. SEARCA is hosted by the government of the Philippines on the campus of the University of the Philippines, Los Baños.

Contact Us offers information for SEARCA’s office on the campus of the University of the Philippines in Los Baños.

Address

Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture
College, Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines

Telephone and E-mail

Laguna Lines: (+63-49) 554-9330 to 39, (+63-49) 536-2290

Manila Lines: (+63-2) 657-1300 to 02

Fax Line: (+63-49) 536-7097

E-mail: post@searca.org
Group 2:  Biodiversity, Conservation, Wildlife

African-Eurasian Waterbird Agreement

Grants and awards for the conservation of migratory waterbirds in developing and transition countries of Africa and Eurasia.

The Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) is an independent international treaty for waterbird conservation. The AEWA works to conserve migratory waterbirds and their habitats across Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, Greenland, and the Canadian Archipelago.

The Agreement encourages coordinated action by its range states in the following themes:

  • Implementation of measures to improve or maintain the conservation status of waterbird species and their populations;
  • Sustainable use (hunting and related)of waterbirds;
  • Increased scientific knowledge about waterbird species, populations, flyways, and threats;
  • Improved communications, education, and public awareness about migratory waterbirds;
  • Improved capacity of AEWA range states and international organizations to conserve migratory waterbirds and their flyways.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1– AEWA Small Grants Fund.  The Small Grants Fund facilitates the implementation of the Agreement in developing countries and transition countries.  The initial focus is on grants in African countries that are signatories of the AEWA.

APPLICATION:  AEWA’s website posts guidelines, application forms, and a calendar deadline for grant applications.

About the program, and how to apply

2– AEWA Waterbird Conservation Award.  This is a cash award to honor institutions and individuals within the Agreement area that have significantly contributed towards the conservation and sustainable use of waterbirds.  The Award is open to government and non-government organizations, enterprises, and individuals.  It is presented at each ordinary session of the Meeting of the AEWA Parties.

AEWA offers one award for institutions and one award for individuals, each at US$5 thousand.

APPLICATION:  AEWA posts the criteria and procedures for the award, a nomination form, and a calendar deadline for receipt of nominations.  The nomination period precedes the ordinary session of the Meeting of the Parties.

About the award, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The developing and transition contracting countries of the AWAE are listed by region, using the geographical classification of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Eurasia and Central Asia: Georgia, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia

Sub-Saharan Africa: Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zimbabwe

The AEWA extends over 119 range states.  The AEWA currently has over 70 countries and the European Community as its contracting parties.

The Small Grants Fund is financed mainly through voluntary contributions, and AEWA is not able to guarantee a regular allocation of funds. The AEWA would like to offer grants on a predictable annual schedule, if financially possible.

AEWA also states the goal of expanding calls for proposals to developing and transition countries in sub-regions in addition to Africa.

AEWA’s website is a valuable source of news, documents, maps, events, and other information on waterbird conservation.

Contact provides information for the UNEP/AEWA’s Secretariat in Bonn, Germany.

Address

UNEP/AEWA Secretariat
UN Campus
Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1
53113 Bonn
Germany.

Telephone and E-mail

Tel.: +49 (0)228 815 2413
Fax: +49 (0)228 815 2450/2470
Email: aewa.secretariat@unep-aewa.org

Website: www.unep-aewa.org

 

 

 

Convention on Biological Diversity

Funding for protected areas in developing and emerging countries

LifeWeb is a platform of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to increase financing for protected areas in the developing world. The program supports the CBD’s Program of Work on Protected Areas.

LifeWeb does not manage its own funds. Rather, it operates as a match-making service between governments that request funding for protected areas, and donors willing and able to provide it.

National governments of developing countries define funding needs for protected areas, and submit these Expressions of Interest to LifeWeb’s Coordination Office. LifeWeb publicizes the Expressions of Interest, and strives to match them with the geographical and thematic priorities of public and private donors.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Finance for protected areas. Governments of developing and transition countries prepare Expressions of Interest at the scale of a national system of protected areas, or at a project scale of one or more protected areas. Each Expression of Interest contains a funding request to expand or increase the effectiveness of ecosystem services provided by protected areas.

In cases where donors respond to the funding requests, the money flows directly from the donor to the recipient government through existing mechanisms of international cooperation.

Grant commitments (“matches”) by donors range from under US$100 thousand to multi-million pledges over several years.

About the program

APPLICATION: The governments of developing countries, and countries in economic transition, submit Expressions of Interest to LifeWeb to invite financial support from donors on a voluntary basis.

Expressions of Interest are submitted to LifeWeb through each developing country’s National Focal Point for protected areas to the CBD. Expressions of Interest can also be prepared and submitted by indigenous and local community groups, if endorsed by the relevant National Focal Point.

LifeWeb posts an application template.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Worldwide

Comments

LifeWeb posts a list of funding matches that can be searched by years, donors, and other criteria.

Projects is a database of funding requests.

The CBD lists the national focal points for its Program of Work on Protected Areas.

LifeWeb’s Coordination Office is located with the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity in Montreal, Canada. It offers complete contact information.

 

Contact info:

 

Address

LifeWeb Coordination Office
413, Saint Jacques Street, suite 800
Montreal QC H2Y 1N9, Canada
Telephone and E-mail
Tel: +1 514 288 2220
Fax: +1 514 288 6588
E-Mail: lifeweb@cbd.int
Web: lifeweb.cbd.int

Convention on Migratory Species

 

Small grants and thesis awards in support of conserving migratory species on a global basis

The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) is an inter-governmental treaty that aims to conserve terrestrial, aquatic, and avian migratory species throughout their range on a global scale. The Convention’s Secretariat is provided by the United Nations Environment Program at the UN’s offices in Bonn, Germany. The Convention is sometimes referred to as the Bonn Convention on Migratory Species.

The CMS addresses migratory species threatened with extinction (Appendix I of the Convention), as well as species that need or would significantly benefit from international cooperation (Appendix II of the Convention).

The participating range states work towards species conservation through global and regional legal agreements, and through less formal memoranda of understanding, varying case by case.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

The CMS includes a small grants program to strengthen implementation of the Convention, and it makes a thesis award for outstanding research on migratory species.

1 — Small Grants Program. The CMS makes grants for field conservation; regional and national cooperation; capacity building; and awareness building in support of migratory species needing protection.

The program is open to applicants in countries that have ratified the Convention, that are below 0.200 in the UN Scale of Assessment, and that are not more than three years in arrears with their contributions.

Applications can be submitted by governmental institutions, NGOs, communities, conservationists, and researchers.

Grants do not exceed €15 thousand for projects of up to two years.

APPLICATION:  When funding is available, CMS posts an announcement, program guidelines, eligibility criteria, application and budget forms, and additional supporting information (English, French, and Spanish).

Applications must be endorsed by the national CMS focal points in the eligible countries where activities will take place. CMS provides their names and contact information.

About the small grants, and how to apply

2 — Thesis Award. The CMS offers this award to promote scientific research and conservation of migratory species. The thesis should provide new data and insights into the biology and ecology of migratory species, or into external factors disrupting their migration patterns. Research results should have conservation applications for the benefit of migratory species.

There are no restrictions by nationality. The amount of the award is €10 thousand, offered every three years at the CMS Conference of the Parties (2008, 2011, 2014, etc.)

APPLICATION: The CMS announces a call for applications in years prior to conferences of the parties. The announcement includes the objective of the award; the criteria to compete for it; an application form; and a description of the selection process.

About the thesis award, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The following developing countries are eligible for small grants from the CMS (as of July 2013), applying the regional geographic framework of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Philippines, Samoa

East Asia: Mongolia

South Asia: Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Armenia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Serbia, Ukraine

North Africa and Middle East: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Congo, Cote D’Ivoire, Dem Rep Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Somalia, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, Tanzania, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay

Comments

The Secretariat of the CMS posts contact information for its Secretariat, as well as its national focal points and members of the scientific council in countries which are parties to the Convention.

Address

UNEP/CMS Secretariat

United Nations Campus

Platz der Vereinten Nationen

1
53113 Bonn, Germany.

Telephone and E-mail

Tel. (+49 228) 815 2401

Fax. (+49 228) 815 2449

E-mail: cms.secretariat@cms.int

Website:
www.cms.int

Other conctacts: 

UNEP/CMS Office – Abu Dhabi

c/o Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi

P.O. Box 45553

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Tel: + 971 2 6934 437 / 541

Email: CmsOffice.ae@cms.int

www.cms.int/dugong

www.cms.int/raptors

IOSEA Marine Turtle MOU Secretariat

c/o UNEP Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific

2nd Floor, United Nations Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue

Bangkok 10200, Thailand

Tel: +(662) 288 1471

Fax: +(662) 288 3041

E-mail: iosea@un.org

www.ioseaturtles.org

 

Ramsar Convention on Wetlands

Grants for conservation, management, and capacity building in support of wetlands protection in developing countries

The Ramsar Convention on Wetlands is an inter-governmental treaty that promotes national action and international cooperation for the conservation and wise use of wetlands.

The Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance includes over 2,000 sites, covering all regions of the planet.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 – Ramsar Grants Programs. Ramsar makes grants in support of the conservation and wise use of wetlands; emergency conservation assistance at Ramsar sites; and education and training in wetlands management.

  • Small Grants Fund for Wetland Conservation and Wise Use— The Small Grants Fund assists developing countries and economies in transition to implement wetlands projects in accord with the Convention’s Strategic Plan 2009-2015. Eligibility extends to government agencies, NGOs, and individuals in developing and emerging countries. Applicants in countries which are not party to the Ramsar Convention are allowed to apply for “preparatory assistance” grants,
  • Wetlands for the Future— This program, funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and administered by Ramsar, offers grants in wetlands education and training in Latin America and the Caribbean. Grants are for teaching, training, university research, and pilot field projects. Eligibility for grants extends to government agencies, academic institutions, and NGOs in Mexico and the Neotropics Region of the Ramsar Convention.
  • Swiss Grant Fund for Africa — The Swiss Grant Fund for Africa is funded by the Federal Government of Switzerland in addition to the annual dues that Switzerland provides to the Convention’s core budget. The Swiss Grant Fund for Africa is administered by the Ramsar Secretariat for specific activities related to wetlands in Africa. The Fund is not open to applications.

APPLICATION: When funding is available, the Small Grants Fund and Wetlands for the Future invite competitive proposals. Operational guidelines for each program describe the criteria and process for submission, provide application forms, and define application deadlines.

About Ramsar’s grants programs, and how to apply

 

2 — Ramsar Wetland Conservation Awards. These awards are to individuals and institutions of any country for achievements in promoting the conservation and wise use of wetlands.

Ramsar makes awards of US$10 thousand in each of different categories. The Conservation Awards are announced at each Conference of the Contracting Parties.

APPLICATION: Nomination information for the Wetland Conservation Awards is available on Ramsar’s website prior to each Conference of the Parties. The information includes the purpose, criteria, eligibility, calendar deadline, and how and where to submit nominations.

About the Conservation Awards, and how to nominate

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Worldwide

Note: Funding through Wetlands for the Future is restricted to Mexico and the Neotropics.

Comments

Ramsar’s website is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Ramsar is not affiliated with the United Nations system of Multilateral Environmental Agreements, but it works closely with them. Ramsar defines itself as a full partner among the cluster of treaties and agreements related to biodiversity.

Ramsar’s Secretariat shares offices with the World Conservation Union (IUCN) in Gland, Switzerland.

 

Address

Rue Mauverney 28

CH-1196 Gland, Switzerland

Telephone and E-mail

  1. +41 22 999 01 70
  2. +41 22 999 01 69

Email: ramsar@ramsar.org

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization

Grants and awards for protection and management of biosphere reserves and world heritage sites

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) implements a broad and cross-cutting agenda, as implied by its name.

Its mission is to help address poverty reduction, educational and scientific advances, cultural heritage, and sustainable development.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB). UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) seeks to promote conservation that is compatible with sustainable development. Launched in the early 1970s, MAB’s network of biosphere reserves has grown to more than 600 sites in over 100 countries.

The MAB offers several awards and prizes.

  • Young Scientists Awards— These are annual small grants for research on ecosystems, natural resources, and biodiversity in the biosphere reserves of developing countries. Grants are to individuals not older than age 40 at the time of application. MAB Young Scientists Awards are up to US$5 thousand for one year.
  • Michel Batisse Award for Biosphere Management— This award is made bi-annually to individuals for outstanding completed work in biosphere reserve management. The Michel Batisse Award is US$6 thousand; one award is made every two years.
  • Sultan Qaboos Prize for Environmental Preservation— This is a bi-annual prize to recognize outstanding environmental research, education and training, awareness creation, and field management of biosphere reserves and natural world heritage sites. Eligibility for the Prize extends to individuals, groups of individuals, institutes, and organizations. The Sultan Qaboos Prize for Environmental Preservation is US$70 thousand awarded every two years.

APPLICATION: The MAB Young Scientists, Michel Batisse Award, and Sultan Qaboos Prize for Environmental Preservation operate through competitive calls for proposals. Guidance, application forms, and calendar deadlines are posted in English and French.

About awards and prizes at MAB, and how to apply

2 — World Heritage Sites.  UNESCO provides the Secretariat of the World Heritage Center. The World Heritage List comprises over 1,000 cultural, natural, and mixed sites in more than 150 countries. UNESCO encourages countries to establish management plans and reporting systems; to provide professional training and technical assistance; to provide emergency assistance for sites at risk; and to raise awareness and international cooperation under the World Heritage Convention.

The International Assistance Program makes grants to the State Parties of the World Heritage Convention for preparatory assistance, conservation and management, and emergency assistance. Eligibility is restricted to parties who officially represent UNESCO at the national level, and to appropriate government ministries and departments.

Grant amounts vary by the type of assistance (i.e., preparatory assistance; technical cooperation; training and research; education and promotion; emergency assistance).

APPLICATION: The World Heritage website provides guidance and a form to submit requests for funding. Except for grants less than US$5 thousand, there is an annual deadline for applications.

About grants for World Heritage sites, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

UNESCO’s member states include the following developing countries, applying the regional structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Brunei, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, And Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Moldova, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

UNESCO’s website is available in English, French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, and Chinese.

UNESCO collaborates with Fauna & Flora International and the United Nations Foundation to jointly support the Rapid Response Facility (RRF). The RFF aims to protect natural World Heritage sites in times of crisis (see the separate profile of the Rapid Response Facility).

UNESCO offers fellowships and other education and training opportunities in addition to the leads included in this profile.

The MAB Program identifies national committees and contacts. The World Heritage Center provides a directory of contacts. UNESCO posts a directory of field offices worldwide.

 

Contact Us

World Heritage Centre
UNESCO
7, Place de Fontenoy
75352 Paris CEDEX 07
France
Tel.: +33 (0)1 45 68 43 78

Contact us

 

 

 Energy, Climate Change

 

Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research

Grants for research and capacity building in the Asia-Pacific region on prevention and mitigation of climate change and other changes in the Earth’s physical and biological systems

Principal Office: International

The Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research (APN) is an inter-governmental network to promote global change research and links between science and policy making in the Asia-Pacific Region.

The scope of the APN includes research on changes in atmospheric composition; changes in coastal zones and inland waters; climate change and variability; and changes in terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Collaborative Regional Research Programme (CRRP). The CRRP promotes research in the Asia-Pacific region on global changes in the Earth’s physical and biological systems in order to fill knowledge gaps, and to contribute to a sound scientific basis for policy-making. Average grant size is about US$45 thousand.

About the program

2 — Capacity Building and Enhancement for Sustainable Development in Developing Countries (CAPaBLE). This is the capacity-building component of APN. It funds scientists in APN’s developing member countries for research, science-policy projects, and awareness raising and dissemination activities. Many grants in CAPaBLE support regional and national workshops, conferences, and other networking activities. Average grant size is about US$40 thousand.

APPLICATION (for 1-2 preceding):  Grants in ARCP and CAPaBLE are to non-profit institutions (such as universities, research institutes, government agencies, and others) in APN member countries and approved countries.

Annual calls for proposals are posted on APN’s website. Sometimes, the APN also announces special calls for focused activities.

Each call for proposals is accompanied by information to describe the program purpose, eligibility criteria, application process, and calendar deadlines.

APN’s grant making follows a two-step process. Summary proposals are submitted for review and screening. Applicants who pass the preliminary review are invited to submit a full proposal for further consideration.

Look for calls for proposals

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

APN’s developing member countries are identified below, using the regional structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eastern Europe and Russia: Russia

Note: Individuals and organizations in the Maldives, Myanmar, Pacific Island States, and Singapore are able to participate in all program activities, and are considered to be from an APN Approved Country.

The developed member countries in APN are Australia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, and USA.

Comments

APN’s website is available in Japanese and English.

News is an active posting of events, APN updates, and other announcements.

APN provides complete contact information for its Secretariat in Japan.

 

Conctact info:

Address

APN Secretariat
East Building, 4F
1-5-2 Wakinohama Kaigan Dori
Chuo-ku, Kobe 651-0073 JAPAN

Telephone and E-mail
Tel: +81-78-230-8017
Fax: +81-78-230-8018

〒651-0073 神戸市中央区
脇浜海岸通1-5-2 東館4F
APN センター

Email:info@apn-gcr.org (for general inquiries about the APN)

apnwebmaster@apn-gcr.org (for questions/comments on the APN Website)

 

Climate for Development in Africa

Funding to strengthen the institutional capacities of national and sub-regional bodies in Africa to formulate and implement effective policies on climate
Climate for Development in Africa (ClimDev-Africa) is an international program of the African Union Commission, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, and the African Development Bank. The program aims to create a solid foundation for Africa’s response to climate change.

ClimDev-Africa makes grants through the ClimDev Special Fund, administered by a coordination unit in the African Development Bank.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

ClimDev Special Fund. CDSF aims to strengthen the institutional capacities of national and sub-regional bodies to formulate and implement effective climate-sensitive policies. The CDSF supports the following objectives:

  • Generation, wide dissemination, and use of reliable climate information for development in Africa;
  • Capacity enhancement of policy makers and policy institutions through analysis and evidence on climate change and its implications for Africa; and
  • Implementation of pilot adaptation practices that demonstrate the value of climate information in development planning and practices.

Eligibility for funding extends to organizations, institutions, and agencies in Africa. NGOs and community-based organizations are eligible if they are Africa-based, or if they partner with African institutions for activities implemented in Africa.

APPLICATION:  Applicants submit project concept notes according to guidance provided in the CDSF Operations and Procedures manual.

Link to application template

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

ClimDev-Africa defines all of Africa within its scope, including North Africa.

North Africa and Middle East

Sub-Saharan Africa

Comments

ClimDev-Africa posts contact information in care of the UN Economic Commission for Africa.

Contact Info:

Address

c/o United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA)
African Climate Policy Centre (ACPC)
Menelik II Rd
P.O.Box 3001
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Telephone and E-mail
Tel: +251 11 551 7200
Fax: +251 11 551 0350
Email: info@climdev-africa.org

 

 

Green Climate Fund

Funding for mitigation and adaptation actions to offset climate change, focusing on the most vulnerable developing countries

 

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was established by 194 governments to limit or reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries, and to help vulnerable societies adapt to the unavoidable impacts of climate change.

The GCF is a stand-alone multilateral financing entity to serve the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), aiming to deliver equal amounts of funding to mitigation and adaptation. The Fund has five priorities:

  • Transforming energy generation and access;
  • Creating climate-compatible cities;
  • Encouraging low-emission and climate-resilient agriculture;
  • Scaling up finance for forests and climate change; and
  • Enhancing resilience in Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Funding of Accredited Entities. The GCF allocates its funding through Accredited Entities (AEs). The AEs vary from international to national and sub-national, and from large to small and micro in terms of organizational scale. They include UN agencies, development banks, development agencies, conservation NGOs, investment funds, government ministries, and others.

To access the GCF’s resources, applicants need to pass an accreditation process. Each applicant is evaluated in relation to its fiduciary standards, environmental and social safeguards, and gender policy. Based on this review, the GCF determines the applicant’s capacity for using different financial instruments (i.e., grants, loans, equity, and guarantees) in programs and projects, and for other roles that it may play in relation to climate mitigation and adaptation.

Entities that are not accredited by the GCF may still submit funding proposals through an AE.

APPLICATION: The GCF posts an application form for applicants seeking accreditation.

The GCF requires a supporting nomination letter from the relevant National Designated Authority or Focal Point for applicants who are sub-national, national, and regional. The CGF provides their names and contact information in each country.

Applications for accreditation can be submitted at any time.

About accreditation, and how to apply

2 — Readiness Grants. The GCF offers grants up to US$1 million per country per year to help developing countries understand the GCF program, and to submit applications for accreditation.

Priority for the readiness grants focuses on the Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Small Island Developing States (SIDS), and African States.

APPLICATION: Proposals for readiness grants are submitted through the country’s National Designated Authority or Focal Point for the GCF. They can be submitted at any time.

About readiness grants, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Worldwide

Comments

The GCF describes its financial resources, with over US$10 billion in initial pledges.

The GFC is governed by a Board of 24 members – equally drawn from developed and developing countries.

The GCF provides an overview of its origins, management, and location in South Korea.

 

Contact info:

Address

Songdo business district

175 Art center-daero

Yeonsu-gu,Incheon 22004

Republic of korea

Telephone and E-mail

+82.32.458.6059

+82.32.458.6010 (Korea Standard Time)

info@gcfund.org

Nordic Climate Facility

Grants to support the world’s low-income countries in programs that address climate change and poverty reduction

 

The Nordic Climate Facility (NCF) provides funding to programs in the world’s low-income countries that address climate change and poverty reduction.

The NDC is financed by the Nordic Development Fund and administered by the Nordic Environment Finance Corporation. Both institutions are supported by the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Nordic Climate Facility. The Facility promotes the exchange of technology, know-how, and innovative ideas between the Nordic countries and the low-income countries on matters of climate change.

Sectoral interests range across environment, transport, water and sanitation, health, agriculture, forestry, and other areas of natural resource management.

Grants are to Nordic organizations (authorities, municipalities, companies, and institutes) in collaboration with partners in eligible low-income countries.

Grants range from €250 thousand to €500 thousand.

APPLICATION: The Nordic Climate Facility makes calls for proposals. Each call defines one or more themes.

Applications are submitted by a Nordic entity in cooperation with partners in eligible countries.

The Facility has a two-stage process for selecting projects. It invites concept notes according to the information it posts in each call for proposals. It requests final proposals from the top-rated concept notes.

About the Nordic Climate Facility, and how to apply for funding

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The Nordic Climate Facility makes grants for projects in low-income countries that are eligible for support from the International Development Association (i.e., the World Bank’s financing program for the low-income countries), and that previously received support from NDF.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam

East Asia: Mongolia

South Asia: Bangladesh, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Kyrgyzstan

Sub-Saharan Africa: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Bolivia, Honduras, Nicaragua

Note: The Nordic Climate Facility may also provide assistance to other low-income countries on a case-by-case basis.

Comments

Potential applicants to the Nordic Climate Facility should review previously funded projects.

Both the Nordic Environment Finance Corporation and the Nordic Development Fund maintain offices in Helsinki (contact NEFCOcontact NDF).

 

Address

Nordic Development Fund

P.O Box 185

FIN-00171 Helsinki

Finland.

Visiting address: Fabianinkatu 34

Telephone and E-mail

Tel: +358 10 618 002

Fax: +358 9 622 1491

 

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

Grants for projects and programs that address the adverse risks and impacts posed by climate change.

 

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is an international environmental treaty developed at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 (the “Earth Summit”).

The resulting Kyoto Protocol was accepted by most of the world’s countries as a legally binding measure to stabilize atmospheric greenhouse gases at a level that will prevent human-caused interference with the world’s climate system.

The UNFCCC uses the Adaptation Fund to make grants for projects and programs in developing countries that are Parties to the Kyoto Protocol.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Adaptation Fund. The Adaptation Fund makes grants for projects and programs that address the adverse impacts of, and risks posed by, climate change. Themes include measures to increase resilience against the threats of droughts, flooding, coastal erosion, etc., and the negative impacts they cause for agriculture, fisheries, water supply, and related aspects of community livelihoods.

Eligibility for grants extends to countries which are Parties to the Kyoto Protocol, with emphasis on developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. Grants are primarily to government organizations such as national ministries, development institutes, local government authorities, and others – sometimes in partnership with civil society organizations.

Small-size projects and programs are under US$1 million. Regular projects and programs are over US$1 million.

APPLICATION: The Fund posts a manual of its operational policies and guidelines, along with a list of the materials to prepare a request for funding.

Project proposals are submitted through any of the Fund’s national, regional, or multilateral Implementing Entities. Proposals need to be endorsed by Designated Authorities in the countries where the projects and programs are implemented.

Proposals can be submitted at any time.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The following developing countries have ratified the Kyoto Protocol (i.e. via acceptance, approval, or accession), applying the regional geographic structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Brunei, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

UNFCCC’s website is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Funded Projects is a guide to the activities of the Adaptation Fund since year 2010.

The Fund provides the names and contact information of the Implementing Entities and the Designated Authorities.

The Fund is financed by revenues generated through emissions reductions under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), and by other sources of funding.

UNFCCC’s website is the world’s most extensive source of announcements, events, and data about climate change. The sitemap can be helpful to navigate the information.

Contact Us offers a menu of subjects, and where to look for the answers.

 

Contact info:

Address

Main office
UNFCCC secretariat
UN Campus
Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1
53113 Bonn
Germany
Haus Carstanjen Office
Martin-Luther-King-Strasse 8
53175 Bonn
Germany

Mailing address

UNFCCC secretariat
P.O. Box 260124
D-53153 Bonn
Germany

Telephone and E-mail

Phone: (49-228) 815-1000
Fax: (49-228) 815-1999
Web: http://unfccc.int

Please note: Courier consignments should be sent to the main office address

 

United Nations Industrial Development Organization

Capacity building for clean industry, sustainable energy, and international trade standards.

The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) provides a platform in the UN system for public, private, and civil society organizations to discuss policy matters of industrial development, globalization, and sustainable environment.

UNIDO’s main programmatic areas are: Poverty Reduction through Productive Activities; Trade Capacity-Building; and Energy and Environment.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

There are no regular grant-making programs or centers in UNIDO. However, UNIDO offers training opportunities through its Institute for Capacity Development.

Institute for Capacity Development. The Institute aims to strengthen UNIDO’s academic partnerships, networking efforts, and capacity-building and training activities.

Supported activities include executive training, university education, joint research, PhD research, and fellowships. Additionally, UNIDO supports summer courses, and in the future intends to sponsor contests and awards.

Subject areas in capacity building range across all of UNIDO’s program areas.

About the Institute for Capacity Development

APPLICATION: Grant seekers should monitor programs for available opportunities.    Announcements usually include objectives, eligibility criteria, application dates, and how and when to apply.

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

UNIDO’s member states include the following developing countries, classified according to the regional structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

UNIDO’s website is available in English, French, and Spanish

UNIDO is a relatively recent implementing agency of the Global Environment Facility.

UNIDO publishes a worldwide directory of its offices.

UNIDO’s Institute for Capacity Development offers contact information.

 

Contact info

Address

UNIDO Institute for Capacity Development
UNIDO, Vienna International Centre,
Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O Box 300,
A – 1400 Vienna, Austria

Telephone and E-mail

E-mail: unido-institute@unido.org

Telephone: +43(1) 26026 3373

 

World Meteorological Organization

 

Fellowships and prizes for meteorological research and program support

Principal Office: International

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is the United Nations’ principal authority on the state and behavior of the Earth’s weather, climate, and water cycle. WMO provides a framework for international cooperation in these areas.

WMO’s program areas include global weather research and monitoring; global atmospheric monitoring; world climate research and monitoring; hydrological monitoring; space observation technology in support of meteorology and hydrology; reduction of disaster risks; agricultural meteorology; marine meteorology; support for public weather services; and others.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Fellowships.  WMO’s Education and Training Fellowships assist WMO’s member countries to educate and train personnel from their National Meteorological and Hydrological Services. Preference is for applications from least-developed and developing countries, and Small Island Developing States.  Applications from women are especially encouraged.

Fellowships are provided for study in subject areas and technologies for which facilities and teaching expertise are not available in the home country. Fellowships should benefit both the individual candidate and the candidate’s institution. WMO awards both short-term (less than six months) and long-term (six months or longer) fellowships.

APPLICATION:   WMO posts the criteria, guidelines, and application details for fellowships.  An application requires endorsement by the Permanent Representative of the recipient WMO member country.

About fellowships, and how to apply

2 — Awards and Prizes. WMO is the convening organization for several awards and prizes in meteorology, accompanied by cash amounts.

  • International Meteorological Organization Prize— The IMO prize honors outstanding work in meteorology or any other field referred to in Article 2 of the WMO Convention.
  • Professor Dr. Vilho Väisälä Awards— The awards are for research papers on meteorological instruments, and for advances in methods of meteorological observation (i.e., one award for research, and another for instrumentation).
  • WMO Research Award for Young Scientists— The award is given to young scientists (not over age 35 at the time of nomination) for outstanding research in meteorology and hydrology.
  • Professor Mariolopoulos Award— The Award is granted every year in recognition of young scientists for exceptional contributions to meteorology and climatology.

 

APPLICATION: WHO posts guidelines and supporting information regarding how and when nominations for each type of award should be prepared and submitted.

About WMO’s awards and prizes, and how to nominate

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

WMO’s member states include the following developing countries, classified according to the structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Brunei, Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Micronesia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Lucia, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Note: WMO’s members also include several territories not recognized as independent countries in the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Comments

WMO supports implementation of the world’s international environmental agreements through partnerships with UNESCO, UNEP, UNDP, GEF, and international bodies for climate change and oceanographic assessment.

Contact Us provides an email form and other contact information.

 

Contact info:

Address

bis, avenue de la Paix,
Case postale 2300
CH-1211 Geneva 2
Switzerland

Telephone and E-mail

Tel.: + 41 (0) 22 730 81 11
Fax: + 41 (0) 22 730 81 81

Group visits are organized upon request and according to the availability of meeting rooms. Requests should be addresses to the Communications and Public Affairs Office: cpa@wmo.int

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Resources Grants

 

Asian Development Bank

Grants for pilot and demonstration activities in water resources

Principal Office:   International

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) defines its mission as helping its developing country member countries to reduce poverty and improve the quality of life of their people.

The Bank operates across all development sectors and themes — including agriculture, energy, climate change, water resources, and several others.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Water Pilot and Demonstration Activities. The ADB makes small grants for pilot and demonstration activities (PDAs) to test and validate approaches, methodologies, and strategies to improve water resources management, water services delivery, and reforms in water policy.

Eligibility for PDAs extends to government agencies and local governments; international and national NGOs; academic and research institutions; and ADB’s staff in regional departments.

PDAs are implemented in less than one year, and for funding of less than US$50 thousand.

About the program

APPLICATION:  ADB describes eligibility for the grants; guidelines for developing proposals; details of the review process; and information about implementing arrangements.  Applicants fill out a PDA request form, which is submitted by email to the program manager.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The following are the developing member countries of ADB which are classified as developing countries in the geographical framework of the Terra Viva Grants Directory:

Southeast Asia and Pacific  Islands:  Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia:  Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Comments

ADB has a NGO and Civil Society Center to provide information about funding, publications, conferences, and other information.

ADB administers financing partnership facilities, trust funds, and other funds.  However, only some of them are accessible for applications.

Countries includes profiles and contact information for ADB’s country and regional offices.  Because most projects are anchored in one or more of the Bank’s developing member countries, grant seekers need to understand ADB’s activities at country and sub-regional levels.

Contact info:

Address

Headquarters (HQ)6 ADB Avenue,

Mandaluyong City 1550, Metro Manila,

Philippines.

Telephone and E-mail
Tel +63 2 6324444

Fax +63 2 6362444

 www.adb.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cross-Cutting Funders 

African Development Bank

Grants for water resources, forest conservation, sustainable energy, and climate change

The African Development Bank (AfDB) is a multilateral development bank whose shareholders include 54 African member countries and 27 member countries from the rest of the world.  The AfDB joins with the African Development Fund and the Nigeria Trust Fund to form the AfDB Group.

The objective of the AfDB is to promote sustainable economic growth in order to reduce poverty in Africa.   Among other program areas, the AfDB funds programs in agriculture and food security, biodiversity conservation, land and water management, sustainable energy, and activities to combat climate change.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

  1. African Water Facility (AWF).The AWF provides financing in integrated water resources management in Africa.  Projects focus on water law and policy, capacity building, public-private partnerships, and other interventions.  Applicants for AWF can be central, local, and municipal African governments; NGOs, community-based organizations; and sectoral, regional, and sub-regional organizations (e.g., for river basins, regional economic bodies, and others).

Grants range from €50 thousand to €5 million.

About the program

APPLICATION: The AWF describes the program, procedures, and qualifications to apply for AWF. The site discusses eligibility for grants, and what to include in project proposals. Completed application forms are sent by email to AfDB. There is no application deadline

How to apply

  1. Congo Basin Forest Fund (CBFF).  Grants are made in several defined themes for activities to avoid deforestation and contribute to poverty alleviation in the forested regions of the Congo Basin:  Burundi, Cameroon, Central Africa Republic, Chad, Congo, Dem Rep Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Rwanda, and São Tome and Principe.

Eligibility for grants extends to governments, NGOs and other civil society organizations, and the private sector.

About the program

APPLICATION: Calls for concept notes are announced on CBFF’s website. The concept notes are screened, and a selected group of applicants are invited to submit full proposals using a standard application form. The CBFF’s website describes the application process, as well as the criteria and review process it uses to evaluate proposals.

Note:  The Fund has not made a call since 2010.

 

  1. Sustainable Energy Fund for Africa (SEFA). SEFA promotes the establishment and growth of small and medium projects for clean energy and energy efficiency in Africa.  SEFA funds project preparation, equity investments, and support for an enabling environment.

APPLICATION: Potential applicants review SEFA’s application guidelines and fill out a request (questionnaire) for funding. There is no calendar deadline.

The Secretariat reviews the requests and identifies appropriate AfDB staff to take successful requests forward for further review by a Technical Committee.

  1. Africa Climate Change Fund (ACCF). The ACCF supports African countries in their transition to a low-carbon path of development.

The scope of funding is broad to support preparation for accessing climate funding; integration of climate change and green growth into strategic documents and projects; preparation and funding of adaptation and mitigation projects; knowledge management and information sharing related to climate change; preparation of strategies and policies on climate change and low-carbon development; analysis of green growth; and advocacy, awareness raising, and capacity building on climate and development.

APPLICATION: Interested eligible beneficiaries are invited to get in touch with the AfDB field office in their country or with the ACCF Secretariat for information.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Comments

AfDB’s website is available in English and French.

Grant seekers can explore Topics and Sectors on AfDB’s website to find information about programs that include agriculture, water supply, energy, climate change, and other environmental themes.

AfDB’s news items for Loans and Grants are searchable by countries, topics and sectors, and dates. This can be a helpful way to track funding commitments.

Contact Us offers departmental contacts for its main office in Abidjan, as well as contact information for its country representatives (i.e., field offices).

 

Address

African Development Bank Group 
Avenue Joseph Anoma
01 BP 1387 Abidjan 01
Côte d’Ivoire

Some Bank operations are located at
Immeuble du Centre de commerce International d’Abidjan CCIA
Avenue Jean-Paul II
01 BP 1387
Abidjan 01, Côte d’Ivoire

Telephone

Phone (Standard): +225 2026 3900

 

African Union

 

 

Research awards in subject areas that include agriculture, environment, and energy

 

The African Union (AU) was established in 2002 to promote international cooperation for the advancement of Africa’s integration and socioeconomic development.   Member states in the AU are the Sub-Saharan countries, as well as some countries of North Africa.The AU is a grant maker through some of the directorates and departments that comprise the AU Commission (i.e., its executive secretariat).

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Kwame Nkrumah Scientific Awards.  The Kwame Nkrumah Awards recognize and honor African scientists for their achievements.  The awards are made in scientific fields that include agricultural sciences, environmental sciences, and energy innovation (among others).   The Kwame Nkrumah awards range from US$5 thousand to a maximum of US$100 thousand, varying by categories.

APPLICATION:  The AU issues calls for applications through its Department of Human Resources, Science, and Technology (HRST).  Review “Announcements” and “News and Events” for the calls.

Link to HRST

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The AU’s member states are identified below, using the regional structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (Western Sahara), Tunisia

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Comments

The AU’s main website is available in English, French, and Arabic.

Some of the AU’s directorates and departments may offer grants.  

Contact Us provides an email form.

 

African Union Headquarters
P.O. Box 3243 | Roosvelt Street

(Old Airport Area) | W21K19 |

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Telephone and E-mail
Tel: (251) 11 551 77 00

Fax:(251) 11 551 78 44 |

Webmaster: webmaster@africa-union.org

Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development

Grants and loans for agricultural development, water resources, energy, and environment in countries of the League of Arab States

The Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development (AFESD) finances development projects, with preference given to joint Arab projects.  The Fund’s members are all the countries of the League of Arab States.

AFESD encourages the investment of private and public funds in Arab countries, and it provides technical assistance in support of Arab economic and social progress.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Approximately 5% of AFESD’s annual net income is allocated to grants. Grants support technical and economic feasibility studies; seminars and conferences, and other institutional support and training. Thematic areas include agriculture and dry lands, water supply, environment, and many others.

  • Inter-Arab (i.e., regional)grants are made to inter-governmental organizations, NGOs, and civil society organizations on regional themes and issues.
  • National grants are made to governmental organizations, NGOs, and civil society organizations.

Grant size varies from the equivalent of less than US$20 thousand to US$10 million and over.

APPLICATION: Requests for grants from AFESD can be submitted by a member state or any eligible Arab, regional, or international organization.

Requests for national grants should be accompanied by a letter from the Fund Governor of the country from which the request is being made.

About loans and grants, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The League of Arab States comprises the countries listed below.

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian Territories, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Djibouti, Mauritania, Somalia, Sudan

Comments

AFESD’s website is available in Arabic and English.

The Arab Fund Fellowships Program provides Arab Ph.D. holders with opportunities to conduct advanced research and/or teaching internationally. Arab nationals who are currently working at universities in AFESD’s member countries are eligible to apply.

AFESD publishes annual reports, which offer details of the Fund’s operations (including grant making).

AFESD provides the services of the Coordination Secretariat of the Arab National and Regional Development Institutions, the Islamic Development Bank, and the OPEC Fund for International Development.

Contact Us provides the information for AFESD’s headquarters in Kuwait.

 

Contact info:

address

H.E. Mr. Abdlatif Yousef Al-Hamad
Director General / Chairman of the board of Directors
P.O. Box 21923 SAFAT
13080 Kuwait
State of Kuwait

Telephone and E-mail

E-MailHQ@ARABFUND.ORG

Telephone(965) 2495 9000

Fax(965) 249 593 90/91/92

CABLEINMARABI KUWAITTLXINMARAB 22153 KT

Caribbean Development Bank

Grants for projects in water supply and sanitation, energy, disaster risk management, and climate change in Caribbean countries.

Principal Office: International 

The Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) aims to assist Caribbean nations to promote broad-based economic growth, inclusive social development, good governance, and regional cooperation and integration. The CDB supports the Millennium Development Goals for the Caribbean region.

The CDB is one of the world’s smallest multilateral development banks. It supports projects for health, education, physical infrastructure, enterprise development, and disaster risk management and climate change. Many funded activities are for water supply and energy.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF). The BNTF provides resources to poor Caribbean communities to improve access to public services, enhance employability, and reduce socio-economic vulnerability. Thematic areas for project funding include community water supply, local environmental degradation, and skills training for livelihoods and enterprises (among many other topics).

BNTF’s support is available to community groups, NGOs, and government agencies in the participating countries. Most grants range from about US$30 thousand to US$500 thousand.

About the program

APPLICATION:   BNTF’s web pages explain the Fund’s goals, objectives, and beneficiary countries.

The BNTF provides contact information for its local offices in each participating country (Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Turks and Caicos Islands).

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The CDB’s member countries and territories are identified below.

Latin America and Caribbean: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turks and Caicos Islands

Note: Not all of these are defined as countries in the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Comments

The Bank posts profiles of funded projects.

The CDB’s Special Development Fund includes a program area for disasters and climate change.

The Bank works through Caribbean Technology Consultancy Services to subsidize technical assistance, workshops, and employment attachments for Caribbean enterprises. The sectors include agro-industry, fisheries, energy, and several others.

Contact Us provides information for CDB’s office in Barbados.

 

Contact info:

address

Caribbean Development Bank
P.O. Box 408
Wildey
St. Michael
Barbados, W.I. BB11000

Telephone and E-mail

Tel: (246) 431-1600
Fax: (246) 426-7269
Email:info@caribank.org

Commission for Environmental Cooperation

Grants to foster conservation, protection, and enhancement of the environment in Canada, USA, and Mexico

The Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) promotes collaboration among Canada, the USA, and Mexico for the conservation, protection, and enhancement of the North American environment.

The CEC contributes to the implementation of the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation, which came into force at the same time as the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

North American Partnership for Environmental Community Action (NAPECA). NAPECA makes grants at the grassroots to build healthy communities and ecosystems, to move towards a low-carbon economy, and to advance innovations for environmental progress in the economies of the three countries.

Grants in NAPECA support actions for capacity building; demonstrations; technology transfer; outreach and education; sharing best practices; environmental training; and others.

The program is open to nonprofit organizations located in Canada, the USA, and Mexico – e.g., NGOs, environmental groups, community-based groups, academic institutions, tribal nations, and indigenous peoples and communities.

Most recent grants range from US$30 thousand to US$150 thousand for projects of one to two years.

APPLICATION: NAPECA periodically announces calls for proposals. It requests pre-proposals, and invites full proposals from the best preliminary submissions.

Pre-proposals are submitted in English, French, or Spanish before the calendar deadline.

About the program, and link to call for proposals

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Latin America and Caribbean: Mexico

Comments

The website of CEC-NAPECA is available in English, French, and Spanish.

 

Contact info:

Address

CEC Secretariat
393 St-Jacques Street West
Suite 200
Montreal (Quebec)
H2Y 1N9
(514) 350-4300
Fax: (514) 350-4314

 

Commonwealth Foundation

Grants to strengthen civil society organizations in Commonwealth countries for participatory governance in sustainable development

Principal Office: UK

The Commonwealth Foundation works to enhance the role of civil society organizations by strengthening their institutional and human capacity — and by creating opportunity for dialogue, collaboration, replication of good practices, and learning.

The Foundation is open to all members of the 53 Commonwealth countries.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Grants to civil society for participatory governance. The Commonwealth Foundation makes grants for projects that contribute to effective, responsive, and accountable governance with civil society participation.

Grants support a wide range of subject areas in grassroots development, including topics related to agriculture and environment. Environmental sustainability is one of three cross-cutting themes.

The grants program is open to civil society organizations (CSOs) in the Foundation’s eligible member countries. Grants are up to £30 thousand per year for projects of up to three years. Applicants need to provide at least 10% counterpart funds.

APPLICATION: The Commonwealth Foundation posts calls for applications. It posts eligibility criteria; an application form; and a submission deadline.

About grants, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Brunei, Kiribati, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga

South Asia: Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Sub-Saharan Africa: Botswana, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia,  Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago

Comments

The Foundation posts its past grants.

The Knowledge Hub includes publications, videos, speeches, and other Commonwealth releases.

Contact Us offers an email form.

 

Commonwealth Foundation

Marlborough HousePall MallLondon

SW1Y 5HYUnited Kingdom

Telephone and E-mail

Tel: +44 (0)20 7930 3783

Fax: +44 (0)20 7839 8157

Email: foundation@commonwealth.int

 

 

 

 

Development Bank of Latin America

Funding for technical cooperation in areas that include environmental sustainability and natural resources in Latin America and the Caribbean

Principal Office:   International

The Development Bank of Latin America (CAF) provides loans, equity investments, financial guarantees, and technical cooperation for economic development.

CAF’s strategic interests include forest conservation and management; bio-commerce; climate adaptation and mitigation; energy conservation and development; water and sanitation; waste management; and integration of environmental concerns in Latin America’s financial institutions.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Applied research and capacity building.   CAF supports applied research on development problems in Latin America in order to help the Bank intervene constructively in debates on public policy, and to help focus its business strategy.

Additionally, CAF sponsors opportunities for professional training, workshops and conferences, and other knowledge-related activities that advance Latin America’s development.

APPLICATION:  When new opportunities are available, CAF announces calls for proposals to describe eligibility, application guidelines, and other supporting information.

Link to Calls 

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

CAF’s shareholder countries (in addition to Spain and Portugal) are indicated below.

Latin America and the Caribbean: Argentina, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

CAF’s website is available in Spanish, Portuguese, and English.

The Bank was formerly the Andean Development Corporation (CAF in Spanish). While retaining emphasis on the Andean countries, the Bank has expanded to serve a broader regional base.

Contact Us offers an electronic form.

Contact info:

Address

 

 

 

 

European Cooperation — Development and Cooperation

Grants in all fields of development assistance that include agriculture, energy, environment, and natural resources

Principal Office: International

The EC’s Directorate-General for Development and Cooperation (EuropeAid) coordinates the EU’s policies and implementation of external development assistance. The aim is to eradicate poverty in partner regions and countries in the context of sustainable development.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Funding for development assistance. EuropeAid delivers funding through budget support, grants, and contracts under the terms of EU’s external aid instruments. Collectively, these instruments establish funding partnerships between the EU and virtually all developing countries.

The range of aid programs is wide and complex through both thematic instruments and geographic instruments. Funding is provided across sectors that include food and agriculture; environment; energy; and others.

About funding programs

APPLICATION: Europe Aid posts calls for proposals. Each call identifies the context of the grant-making program, eligibility criteria, grant size, requirements on matching funds, how and when to submit proposals, the review process, contact information, and other supporting details.

Note: Grant applicants must be registered with PADOR. This refers to a database of organizations which apply for EC grants in the field of external assistance. Online registration is free, and PADOR’s web pages provide guidance to complete the registration process.

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Worldwide

Comments

Europe Aid in Brussels cannot be relied on for all calls. Some calls are made by the EU’s country-level Delegations in coordination with national authorities in those countries.

EuropeAid provides an email form for contact.

Contact info:

Address

European commission

Development and cooperation- Europe Aid

B-1049 Brussels

Belgium.

Telephone

Tel: +32 (0)2 29 99 814

: +32 (0)2 29 99 818

 

European Commission — Environment

Grants for nature conservation, environmental policy, environmental communication, NGO support, and environmental technology

The EC’s Directorate-General for Environment (DG Environment) promotes policies that ensure a high level of environmental protection in the European Union. DG Environment has oversight of EU environmental law, and it finances projects that contribute to environmental protection in the EU.

Grant making in DG Environment supports environmental protection in EU member states. However, some grants may benefit other countries, e.g., EU candidate countries and EU neighborhood countries.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — LIFE. LIFE is the EU’s principal financial instrument to co-fund programs and projects in nature and biodiversity, environmental policy and governance, and environmental information and communication in Europe. Since its beginning in 1992, LIFE has funded over 3,000 projects with an expenditure of over €3 billion.

About LIFE


2 — Grants for NGO Programs that Operate in Multiple European Countries
. The EU supports environmental NGOs which work at the European level, currently defined as a minimum of three EU countries.

About operating grants for European environmental NGOs

3 — Eco-Innovation. The Eco-Innovation program co-funds institutional cooperation to develop and diffuse eco-innovative products and services in Europe. The priority is to support small and medium European enterprises in collaboration across countries.

APPLICATION  (for 1-2-3 preceding): DG Environment identifies funding opportunities by program areas. Calls for proposals include guidelines, eligibility requirements, application forms, submission deadlines, and other supporting materials.

Note: Eligibility to participate in these programs is open to organizations in EU member states for actions in the EU territory. However, in some cases, grant programs may be open to participation of third countries, particularly EU candidate countries and EU neighborhood countries. The actual determination of eligible countries is made on the basis of implementation regulations, available funding, and other factors. Grant seekers need to consult details in each annual work program and each call for proposals to review the eligibility criteria.

About funding opportunities

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The EU’s candidate countries, potential candidate countries, and neighborhood partnership countries (ENPI) include the following developing countries.

Eurasia and Central Asia: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestinian Territories, Syria, Tunisia

Note: Iceland is a candidate country and Israel is a neighborhood country. However, both are classified as “developed” according to the criteria of this Directory.

Comments

DG Environment manages a database of grants funded through LIFE. The database indicates that participation by third (non-EU) countries has decreased dramatically after 2006.

DG Environment identifies other EU programs that offer funding in environment and natural resources.

 

European commission

Environment Life program- EuropeAid

B-1060 Brussels

Belgium.

Telephone & E-mail

Tel: +32 2 524 96 88

 

Email: envi-clima-life-helpdesk@ec.uropa.eu

 

European Commission — Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection

Support and training to prevent, prepare for, and respond to disasters

 

The European Union responds to natural and human-caused disasters through the EC’s Directorate-General for Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection (DG ECHO).

ECHO directs humanitarian aid to developing countries, and it extends measures for civil protection to EU countries and other countries.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

The EU’s international cooperation for disaster response extends across the EU candidate countries, EU neighborhood countries, and other third countries. Moreover, the EU works through regional initiatives, and it collaborates with international organizations, in matters of responding to natural and human-caused disasters.

ECHO provides emergency responses after disasters occur, and it supports programs to prevent and mitigate them.

1 – Civil Protection Mechanism (Disaster Response).  This is the EU’s instrument to facilitate assistance in the event of major emergencies that require urgent responses. Examples are forest fires, floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, marine oil spills, and others.

About the Civil Protection Mechanism

APPLICATION: Requests for emergency assistance are directed to ECHO’s Emergency Response Coordination Center (ERCC). Any country affected by a major disaster – inside or outside the EU – can request assistance. The ERCC coordinates communications in ECHO and at the EC level in order to offer a response.

About the Emergency Response Coordination Center

2 — Disaster Preparedness. ECHO funds the Civil Protection Financial Instrument to reinforce international cooperation in civil protection. In addition to courses and exercises, the program provides for cross-country exchange of experts in civil protection. Participants in training and exchanges are from EU countries, as well as from third countries, according to the objectives of annual work plans.

APPLICATION:  Each year, ECHO develops a work plan for capacity building in support of civil protection. The work plan identifies activities to be funded, available budgets for each activity, and participation criteria.

About the program, and calls for proposals

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Worldwide

Comments

ECHO’s website is available in English and French.

ECHO posts calls for proposals.

Vademecum is a summary of ECHO’s role in civil protection.

The EC funds humanitarian assistance through about 200 partner organizations. They are civil society organizations in the EU countries, together with several United Nations agencies and international organizations (e.g., Red Cross and Red Crescent societies).

ECHO posts an email contact form.

 

 

 

European commission

Humanitarian Aid and Civil protection.

Rue de la loi

86-1000 Brussels

Belgium.

Telephone

Tel: +32 (0)2 299 11 11

European Commission — Research and Innovation

Grants for EU research collaboration with developing countries in themes of agriculture, fisheries, biotechnology, energy, environment, and climate change

Principal Office: International

The EC’s Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG Research) develops the European Union’s policy in the field of research and technological development.  Horizon 2020 is the research framework for years 2014-2020, following FP7 during years 2007-2013.

Many programs in DG Research are open to partners in non-EU countries. Calls for proposals sometimes include specific priorities where non-EU participation is encouraged or required.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Bioeconomy.  This refers to those parts of the economy that use renewable biological resources from land and sea — such as crops, forests, fish, animals, and micro-organisms — to produce food, materials and energy.

About the program

2 — Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions. The Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions are a program of fellowships and institutional strengthening to fund training networks; international research exchanges; grants for career development and integration; co-funding of regional, national, and international programs; and industry-academic partnerships.

Some opportunities are open on a worldwide basis, while others are restricted to individuals and organizations in EU member states (sometimes including candidate countries and associated countries).

About the program

3 — International Cooperation.  DG Research supports bilateral and bi-regional coordination in science and technology, including programs and projects with some developing and emerging countries

APPLICATION (for 1-2-3 preceding):  Applicants for grants and fellowships need to register with CORDIS.  CORDIS (Community Research and Development Information Service) is the EC’s service to provide details about its research programs, and to announce calls for proposals.

Proposals are submitted online, and CORDIS explains the procedure.

All research programs work through calls for proposals. Each call includes guidelines, eligibility criteria, deadlines, and supporting information.

Depending on the specific program and call for proposals, eligibility for funding is open to universities; research centers and institutes; international organizations; private enterprises; public agencies; and individuals. Country eligibility varies with country categories.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Using the geographical classification of the Terra Viva Grants Directory, the following developing countries are EU candidate countries, associated countries, and third countries that are automatically eligible for funding in DG Research and Innovation.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian Territories, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

The EU has bilateral agreements in science and technology with several non-EU countries. Among them are the following developing and emerging countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Egypt, India, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, South Africa, Tunisia, and Ukraine.

CORDIS offers a partners service to help researchers find collaborators, and to help project leaders search for individuals with needed experience and skills. Note: This may be an effective channel for researchers in the developing world to seek connections with Europe, and vice versa.

Additionally, CORDIS maintains a database of national contacts in the EU and in third countries.

DG Research publishes its strategy for international cooperation to accompany Horizon 2020.

Address

European commission

DG research & Innovation

Square frere-Orban

8-1000 Brussels

Belgium.

Telephone

Tel: +32 (0)2 299 11 11

 

Global Environment Facility

 

Grants for projects related to biodiversity, climate change, chemicals and waste, international waters, land degradation, forest management, and ozone depletion

Principal Office: International

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is a partnership for international cooperation in which over 180 countries work together with international institutions, civil society organizations, and the private sector to address global environmental issues.

The GEF is the financial mechanism for five international conventions (Biodiversity; Climate Change; Persistent Organic Pollutants; Mercury; and Desertification) in addition to supporting implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer. The GEF’s program areas are:

  • Biodiversity;
  • Climate change (mitigation and adaptation);
  • Chemicals and waste;
  • International waters;
  • Land degradation;
  • Sustainable forest management; and
  • Ozone depletion.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

The grant-making programs in GEF are many and complex. GEF provides grants to various types of projects ranging from several thousand dollars to several million dollars.

  • Full-Sized Projects— For grants over US$2 million, GEF’s implementing agencies work with an operational focal point in each country to develop project ideas consistent with the country’s priorities, and with GEF’s operational strategy and programs. Full-sized projects have to be approved by GEF’s Council.
  • Medium-Sized Projects— Grants of less than US$2 million are available through expedited procedures that speed processing and implementation. They are intended to encourage a wide variety of interested parties to develop and propose project concepts.
  • Enabling Activities— The GEF finances capacity-building activities under the conventions on biodiversity, climate change, and persistent organic pollutants. The GEF provides grants for developing plans, strategies, programs, and reports in support of the relevant conventions.
  • Programmatic Approach— This framework connects GEF with the private sector, aid donors, and the scientific community in programs that integrate global environmental objectives into national and regional strategies. A program usually contains several projects to foster increased horizontal and vertical integration.
  • Small Grants– The GEF’s Small Grants Program provides NGOs and community organizations with grants of up to US$50 thousand in GEF’s thematic areas. The Small Grants Program is implemented by the United Nations Development Program.  (Note: The Terra Viva Grants Directory includes the SGP in our profile of the UNDP).

About types of projects

APPLICATION:   Any individual or group in a GEF member country may propose a project. Project concepts can be developed by governments, NGOs, communities, the private sector, and other civil society entities. The project must reflect national or regional priorities, and it must have the support of the country or countries in which the project will be implemented.

GEF’s operational focal points administer the in-country coordination of GEF’s projects. Grant seekers begin by contacting the country’s operational focal point to verify that project ideas will be eligible for GEF’s consideration. They subsequently prepare a Project Identification Form in close coordination with one of GEF’s partner agencies.

Many projects begin with a project preparation grant. Project ideas that meet initial criteria are submitted for further processing, depending on the type of grant requested. Larger projects are reviewed by GEF’s Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel and, when appropriate, the secretariats of the relevant conventions.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

GEF’s member developing countries are identified below in the regional geographical structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djbouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

Projects and programs are designed and carried out in partnership with several international agencies for project implementation. The GEF is in process of accrediting additional project agencies.

GEF’s database of projects can be searched by country, focal area, operational program, dates of project approval, and project size.

The GEF works through operational focal points in each country.

The GEF-CSO Network is an important link between the GEF and civil society organizations around the world.

Note: The Terra Viva Grants Directory offers a separate profile of the French program of the GEF, which adheres to the same GEF program areas, but is managed by French institutions.

 

Address

Global Environment Facility

1818 H street,NW,20433,

Washington, District of Columbia

USA.

Telephone & E-mail

Tel: +1 (202) 473 0508

Fax: +1 (202) 522 3240/3245

Email: secretarait@TheGEF.org

 

Inter-American Development Bank

 

Loans and grants in Latin America and the Caribbean for projects in water and sanitation, agriculture, sustainable energy, disaster prevention, and management of natural resources.

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) was established in 1959 as the first of the world’s regional development banks. Its purpose is to foster sustainable economic development and social progress in Latin America and the Caribbean. It does this through its lending operations, its research and knowledge dissemination, and its role in helping to shape regional policy discussions.

The IDB and its related Multilateral Investment Fund finance a number of grants for water and sanitation, energy, and natural resources.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Spanish Cooperation Fund for Water and Sanitation in Latin America and the Caribbean. Administered by IDB, the Spanish Cooperation Agency for International Development (AECID) created a special fund for projects related to drinking water; sewage systems; wastewater treatment; urban rainwater drainage; water resources management; solid waste management; and efficiency and operations management.

Eligibility for grants includes government entities; companies; cooperatives; NGOs which provide water and sanitation services; and other entities that provide public water and sanitation services in any member country of the Ibero-American Community of Nations, and in Haiti. There is no maximum or minimum grant size.

APPLICATION: An application form (Spanish only) is available through IDB and through AECID. Completed applications are sent to the Fund’s program managers at BID or AECID. There are no calendar deadlines for applications.

About the Spanish Cooperation Fund, and how to apply

2 — Japan Special Fund for Poverty Reduction (JPO). The Japan Special Fund for Poverty Reduction makes grants to civil society organizations for community-based projects that address poverty reduction. Grants support projects in basic social services, productive activities, and community capacity building in themes of water and sanitation, agriculture and fisheries, disaster prevention, and many others.

APPLICATION: IDB/JPO posts periodic calls for proposals that describe grant themes, eligibility criteria, grant size, and how and when to apply.

About the JPO, and how to apply

3 — Social Entrepreneurship Program (SEP). The SEP provides financing through local partner organizations to individuals and groups that generally do not have access to commercial or development loans on regular market terms. Projects help micro and small producers in marginalized communities with innovative financing. A second type of project funds pilot initiatives for business approaches to supply potable water, renewable energy, and other basic services. Most projects funded through SEP are combinations of loans and grants.

Eligibility in SEP extends to private companies, NGOs, foundations, cooperatives, producers’ associations, and public-private partnerships that operate in any of IDB’s member countries of Latin America and the Caribbean.

APPLICATION: Applicants contact the relevant country office of IDB for guidance to fill out a preliminary application. If the preliminary application is approved, the next steps are to prepare a project profile, and to submit financial and other documentation in support of the application.

About the SEP, how to apply

4 — Multilateral Investment Fund. MIF (FOMIN in Spanish) supports financial institutions such as banks, cooperatives, producers associations, and NGOs — which in turn lend to micro and small enterprises. Activities funded under MIF include sustainable agriculture, markets for clean energy, technologies for cleaner production, sustainable tourism, and the establishment of environmental funds – among others.

Public as well as non-profit organizations (NGOs, industry associations, chambers of commerce, and foundations) are eligible to apply. Most grants range from under US$150 thousand to US$3 million. MIF requires counterpart contributions.

APPLICATION: Applicants create a user account with MIF, and then fill out an eligibility form to determine whether proposals will meet MIF’s criteria to apply for financing. If so, the applicants complete and submit an online application. There is no deadline for submitting proposals. Note: MIF also issues occasional calls for proposals, including project proposals in defined themes.

About the MIF, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Regional members of IDB need to be prior members of the Organization of American States. The following are the developing country members.

Latin America and Caribbean: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

IDB’s website is available in Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French.

The Bank publishes a quick link to calls for proposals.

IDB explains its relationships with civil society.

IDB is a partner with the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture in sponsoring the Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology (FONTAGRO), which is a grant maker for agricultural research.

IDB provides a directory of its offices at country level, including country programs and contact information.

Contact Us offers information for IDB’s headquarters office in Washington, DC. and for its offices in member countries of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Contact info:

Address

Inter-American Development Bank

1300 New York Avenue, NW.

Washington DC. 20577, USA.

Telephone

Tel: (202 623-1000

Fax: (202) 623-3096

 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

 

Grants for scientific collaboration to promote international peace and security, including in security concerns related to environment and energy

Principal Office: International

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is an alliance of North America with Western Europe to fulfill the goals of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in 1949. The role of NATO is to protect the freedom and security of its member countries by political and military means.

Through different organizational structures, NATO member countries coordinate with partner countries — including many countries in the developing world.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Science for Peace and Security (SPS). NATO provides grants for projects that promote international cooperation in civil science and innovation through its Science for Peace and Security (SPS) program.

Among other priorities, the SPS funds activities for energy security and environmental security.

Grants through SPS are for multi-year projects, technical workshops, and training courses. Grant size varies with the type of funding.

About the program

APPLICATION: Applications are submitted by individual scientists from NATO countries jointly with colleagues from partner countries.

For each type of grant, the website provides guidelines for applicants and an application form. The guidelines discuss grant purpose, eligibility, allowable expenditures, reporting requirements, and how and where to submit applications.

Applications are reviewed several times a year, following the published application deadlines.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Listed below are the developing countries among NATO’s member and partner countries, applying the regional geographical framework of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

East Asia: Mongolia

South Asia: Pakistan

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Turkey, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates

Sub-Saharan Africa: Mauritania

Comments

NATO provides contact information for its SPS Program, with office in Brussels.

Address

NATO HQ

B.d. Leopold III

B-1110 Brussels

Belgium

Telephone & E-mail

Fax: +32 2 707 4232

Email: sps.applications@hq.nato.int

 

OPEC Fund for International Development

Grants for technical assistance and capacity building in agriculture, water and sanitation, energy, and other development sectors

Principal Office: International

The OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID) is an inter-governmental financial institution established by the member states of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

The Fund aims to facilitate cooperation among OPEC’s members and other developing countries as an expression of South-South solidarity. In particular, OFID aims to help the lower-income countries in their pursuit of social and economic advancement.

The Fund’s operational areas include public sector lending; private sector lending; trade finance; and grant making.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

OFID makes grants to support technical assistance for small-scale social projects, to fund research and capacity building, and to provide emergency aid. Other grants support special accounts (HIV/AIDS, Palestine, and Energy Poverty).

1 — Technical Assistance. Grants for technical assistance support projects in agriculture, energy, water and sanitation, and other development sectors. Most grants range from about US$100 thousand to over US$1 million.

2 — Capacity Building and Applied Research. OFID supports applied research with an emphasis on capacity building and knowledge exchange (workshops, conferences, etc.) in themes that include agriculture, water resources, energy, climate change, land degradation, and others. Most grants range from about US$20 thousand to US$100 thousand.

3 — Energy Poverty. This program focuses on small-scale energy solutions, primarily to off-grid rural communities. Grants for workshops and other knowledge exchange usually are less than US$50 thousand. Grants for technical assistance are larger, passing US$500 thousand in some cases.

About grant-making in OFID

APPLICATION: Grants are available to international, national, regional, and non-governmental organizations. Activities in all developing countries, except OPEC’s member countries, are eligible for OFID’s assistance. The highest priority is for initiatives that benefit the world’s least-developed countries.

Applicants complete a grant application form, and include their organization’s registration certificate. Applications can be submitted at any time; there is no calendar deadline.

How to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Worldwide, except in OPEC countries (see below).

Note: OPEC’s member countries are Algeria, Gabon, Indonesia, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela.

Comments

Over many years, OFID contributed support to other grant-making development organizations, including the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the Common Fund for Commodities (CFC).

OFID publishes an annual report in multiple languages.

Contact Us provides information for OFID’s office in Vienna.

Address

OFDI The OPEC for international

Development.

Parkring 8,A-1010 Vienna, Austria.

P.O Box 995,A-1011 Austria.

Telephone

Tel: +43-1-1-515 60-0

Fax+43 -1-1513 9238

 

Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe

Environmental security in Southeastern Europe, Eastern Europe, South Caucasus, and Central Asia

The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) is the world’s largest regional security organization. It supports field operations in Southeastern Europe, Eastern Europe, South Caucasus, and Central Asia.

The OSCE regards economic and environmental progress as essential for regional stability.  OSCE aims to raise environmental awareness, and to promote public participation in environmental decision-making.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Environmental activities. OSCE’s environmental initiatives support the following activities:

  • Improving public awareness and understanding of environmental problems;
  • Conducting environmental surveys and evaluations;
  • Building technical and management capacity for environmental issues in local organizations;
  • Promoting cross-institutional approaches for environmental management.

About environmental activities

APPLICATION:  Grants are to nonprofit civil society organizations in many of the countries where OSCE is active. Most grants range from €5 thousand to €10 thousand for projects of one year or less.

Grant making is administered through OSCE’s country offices. Grant seekers should consult national newspapers and OSCE’s websites in these countries to find calls for proposals.

Link to OSCE country offices

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The OSCE has a field presence in the following countries.

Eurasia and Central Asia: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Serbia, Ukraine

Comments

OSCE is an organizational member of the Environment and Security Initiative (ENVSEC) to advance issues of peace and the environment. Through its organizational members, ENVSEC is a funder of national and regional environmental programs.

OSCE works closely with the Aarhus Centers and Public Environmental Information Centers. The OSCE supports a network of close to 50 Aarhus Centers in several countries. Note: This refers to Europe’s Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making, and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters — adopted in 1998 in Aarhus, Denmark.

OSCE’s Secretariat for Economic and Environmental Activities publishes information about environmental issues in the regions of interest.

Contacts offers information for OSCE’s Secretariat in Vienna.

Address

OSCE Secreterait

Wallnerstrasse 6

1010 Vienna,Austria.

Telephone

Tel: +43 1 514 360

Fax: +43 1 514 36 6996

Email: pm@osce.org

: visit@osce.org

 

Union for the Mediterranean

Projects in the Mediterranean region in subject areas that include energy and climate change, and water and environment

The Union for the Mediterranean (UfM) is an intergovernmental organization of the 28 member countries of the European Union and 15 countries from the Southern and Eastern shores of the Mediterranean. The UfM is a forum to enhance regional cooperation and dialogue in the Euro-Mediterranean region.

The UfM is not a donor institution. The role of the UfM Secretariat is to assist project development, the search for financial resources, and the search for political and technical support needed for project implementation.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

The UfM promotes a wide range of projects in the Mediterranean region in subject areas that include energy and climate, water and environment, and several others.

For projects of relevance to UfM, the Secretariat reviews and revises proposals in order to insure their compliance with the UfM’s mandate and priorities. The reviewed and revised proposals are then sent to the governing structure of the UfM for requested endorsement as a UfM-labelled project. The label is intended to help the project promotor achieve visibility for further support, and to mobilize partners.

1 — Energy and Climate Action. The UfM’s objectives in this area include structured regional dialogue that connects member states, regional organizations, financial institutions, and industry and experts on the theme of energy and climate change. Additionally, the UfM supports promotion and replicability of projects on energy and climate.

About the thematic area

2 — Water and Environment. The UfM aims to promote access to water resources and water management; protect the Mediterranean Sea and its environment for sustainable development; and contribute to de-pollution and pollution prevention.

About the thematic area

APPLICATION (1-2 preceding): The UfM publishes project guidelines and criteria, together with information about how to submit proposals.

Project proposals can be submitted by national, regional and local authorities and public institutions; the private sector; international institutions; civil society organizations; and consortia of such organizations.

Proposals can be submitted in either English or French. Proposals are accepted continuously; there is no calendar deadline.

How to submit projects

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The developing member countries of the UfM are identified below, using the regional structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Eurasia and Central Asia: Turkey

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Tunisia

Sub-Saharan Africa: Mauritania

Comments

UfM’s website is available in Arabic, English, and French.

Questions and Answers is a summary of the UfM program.

The UfM posts a projects database.

Contact offers complete information for UfM’s Secretariat in Barcelona, including telephones and emails of contacts by subject areas.

Address

Palacio de Pedralbes

Pere Duran Farell,11

08034 Barcelona,spain .

Telephone & E-mail

Tel: 00 34 93 521 4100

Fax: 00 34 93 521 4102

Email: info@ufmsecretariat.org

 

United Nations Development Program

 

The GEF Small Grants Program and the Equator Initiative make grants to civil society organizations for environmental protection and poverty reduction

Principal Office: International

The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) is among the world’s largest multilateral organizations for development assistance, present in all regions of the developing world. At the country level, UNDP normally coordinates activities for the United Nations system as a whole.

UNDP is one of the implementing agencies of the Global Environment Facility, and UNDP manages the GEF’s Small Grants Program (see the separate profile of GEF in the Terra Viva Grants Directory).

Moreover, UNDP coordinates the Equator Initiative which awards the Equator Prize.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — GEF Small Grants Program (SGP). The SGP funds community-based projects in biodiversity conservation, climate change adaptation and abatement, protection of international waters, prevention of land degradation, and reduction of the impact of persistent organic pollutants (i.e., the focal areas of the GEF more widely).

Grants are for assessment and planning; pilot demonstrations; monitoring and analysis; and dissemination, networking, and policy dialogue. Grant recipients are community-based organizations, NGOs, and other grassroots organizations. The maximum grant size is US$50 thousand, and the average is about US$25 thousand.

About the program

APPLICATION:   SGP provides guidelines regarding the types of projects it funds under each focal area. The grant seeker contacts the relevant SGP National Coordinator to receive guidelines and an application form.

Applications follow a two-step process, starting with a concept note. Based on the concept note, the National Coordinator will determine whether to ask for a full proposal. Project proposals must satisfy the SGP Country Program Strategy, overseen by a National Steering Committee.

About how to apply

2 — Equator Initiative. The Equator Initiative is a partnership of UN agencies, national governments, conservation organizations, and others to support local approaches for poverty reduction and biodiversity conservation. The Equator Initiative awards the Equator Prize for innovative biodiversity conservation to multiple recipients on a cycle of every two years.

Prize recipients are community-based organizations and local groups in the eligible countries.  As originally defined, the Equator Prize recognizes initiatives within the equatorial zone (i.e., 23.5 degrees latitude North and South of the Equator). However, the selection criteria for the Prize have been broadened. Civil society organizations in nearly all developing countries — tropical and temperate — are eligible to compete for the Prize.

The amount of the prize is determined in each prize cycle.  Note:  In the cycle 2015, the Equator Initiative awarded US$10 thousand to each of 20 winning projects. 

About the program

APPLICATION: The Equator Initiative posts calls for nominations that include eligibility requirements, nomination forms, and information about how and when to nominate.

Awards are normally made every two years.

About nominations

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

The following developing countries participate in GEF’s Small Grants Program (SGP), applying the regional classification of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia

South Asia: Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Macedonia, Moldova, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestinian Territory, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

UNDP’s main website is available in English, French, and Spanish.

The GEF Small Grants Program offers a projects databasecontact details, and other helpful information.  Applicants to the GEF Small Grants Program could be interested in the work of the GEF-CSO Network.

The Equator Initiative identifies past winners of the Equator Prize. It posts contact information for its administrative staff in New York.

Address

United Nations Development Pragram.

304 East 45th street, 9th floor,

New York Avenue, NY,10017

USA.

Telephone & E-mail

Tel: +1 646 781 4385

Email: sgp.info@undp.org

United Nations Environment Program

 

Grants and awards in support of poverty alleviation and environmental sustainability
The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) refers to itself as the voice of the United Nations system on matters of environment. It monitors the status of the global environment, and it raises awareness to promote international actions on major environmental problems.

UNEP works through a number of scientific advisory groups and collaborating technical centers. It makes small grants in the Caribbean Environment Program, and it offers the SEED Awards for enterprise and environmental sustainability.

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

1 — Caribbean Environment Program. UNEP’s Caribbean Environment Program (CEP) is the implementing framework of the Cartagena Convention (1983) for the protection of the Caribbean marine environment.

Among its program areas, the CEP makes small grants to strengthen marine protected areas and to support sustainable fisheries in the wider Caribbean region.

About the Caribbean Environment Program

APPLICATION: Small grants in the CEP are in collaboration with the International Climate Initiative and The Nature Conservancy.

Contact information is provided.

About small grants

 

2 — SEED Initiative. In partnership with other organizations, UNEP offers the SEED Awards for Entrepreneurship in Sustainable Development to support locally-led initiatives for poverty eradication and environmental sustainability.

The awards are made to social entrepreneurs, local communities, minority and women’s groups, environmental organizations, and others. Each award winner receives a package of services (technical assistance and business services), and a cash grant of US$5 thousand.

APPLICATION: The SEED Initiative operates through an annual call for applications. SEED posts eligibility criteria, application guidelines, frequently asked questions, and an application form.

About the SEED Awards, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

UNEP serves all UN Member States, including the following developing countries classified according to the regional structure of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Brunei, Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia, North Korea

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian Territory, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

UNEP’s website is available in several languages.

UNEP is an implementing agency of the Global Environment Facility.

The Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute manages the CaMPAM Network and Forum, posting news and opportunities relevant to Caribbean conservation.

This profile does not include several environmental awards that UNEP endorses and sponsors. Grant seekers should make their own research in Awards. Except for the SEED Initiative, most awards are honorary, and do not provide monetary or material support.

Contact Us includes links to UNEP’s regional offices.

Address

New York

2 UN Plaza ,Rm, DC-803,

323 E.44th streetNew York, NY 10017

USA.

Nairobi. HQ

United Nations

Limuru Road, Gigiri.

P.O Box 67578-00200,

Nairobi, Kenya

 

Telephone

Tel: 212-963-8210

Fax: 212-963-7341

Email: unepnyo@un.org

 

Tel; +254-20-762-3798

Fax: +254-20-762-4349

Email: narobi.unic@unon.org

 

World Bank

Grants in programs for energy, water and sanitation, and other themes of production, environment, and sustainable development

The World Bank is a major source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries in all parts of the world. It is made up of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), and the International Development Association (IDA).

The IBRD focuses on middle-income and credit-worthy countries which are economically poor, while the IDA focuses only on the economically poorest countries. Together the IBRD and IDA provide credits, grants, and low-interest loans to finance all aspects of economic development.

The World Bank’s programs include all areas of environment in relation to sustainable development (i.e., agriculture, land use, energy, climate change, water and sanitation, waste management, forests, fisheries, minerals, biodiversity, hazardous chemicals, and others).

Grant Programs for Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Natural Resources

Most grant-making programs in the World Bank are broad and cross-cutting. Below we identify programs that make competitive grants in one or more subject areas of importance in this Directory.

1 — Public-Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility (PPIAF). The PPIAF facilitates public-private partnerships in energy supply, water supply and waste treatment, and other types of infrastructure (telecommunications, transport systems). The Facility funds technical assistance, and it makes grants to sub-national entities that want to improve their access to credit.

Most proposals to PPIAF originate through national and local governments, although the application process is open to all.

About the program

APPLICATION: PPIAF provides eligibility criteria, application guidelines, an application form, and contact information. Applicants require approval from their governments. Applications can be submitted at any time.

How to apply

2 — Cities Alliance Catalytic Fund.  The Cities Alliance is a global partnership to reduce urban poverty and to promote the role of cities in sustainable development. The Alliance helps cities to formulate sustainable financing strategies, and to attract long-term capital investments for infrastructure and other services (e.g., water and sanitation, energy, etc.).

Through the Catalytic Fund, the Cities Alliance makes grants to city governments, local authorities, associations of local authorities, and/or national governments. Grants range from US$50 thousand to US$250 thousand.

About Cities Alliance

APPLICATION: The Catalytic Fund announces calls for proposals. Each call identifies the grants theme (when relevant), eligibility requirements, submission guidelines, and the application deadline.

The Fund uses a two-stage selection process that begins with concept notes, followed by invitations for full applications from presenters of the top-rated concept notes.

About the Catalytic Fund, and how to apply

Geographical Distribution of Grant Activities in Developing Countries

Member countries in the World Bank Group include the developing countries identified below, applying the regional classification of the Terra Viva Grants Directory.

Southeast Asia and Pacific Islands: Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam

East Asia: China, Mongolia

South Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Eastern Europe and Russia: Albania, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine

Eurasia and Central Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian Territory, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen

Sub-Saharan Africa: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Dem Rep of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Latin America and Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Comments

The World Bank’s website is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish. Moreover, certain materials are available in additional languages.

The World Bank Group administers over 1,000 Trust Funds. Programs supported by trust funds can be explored for grant possibilities. In order to be eligible to access trust funds, grant seekers need to partner with government agencies or units of the World Bank.

The World Bank hosts the secretariat of the Program on Forests (PROFOR).  PROFOR is a multi-donor partnership to improve the livelihoods of forest-dependent people; promote good forest governance; finance sustainable forest management; and coordinate forest policy with other sectors. Participants in PROFOR include civil society organizations, conservation NGOs, universities and research institutes, private firms and consultants, and international organizations. PROFOR does not accept unsolicited proposals.

The Bank highlights the growing portfolio of funds related to climate change. To date, the climate funds offer few opportunities through competitive grants.

The Bank is a founding member of the Global Tiger Initiative, which currently does not have a grant-making activity.

The World Bank Institute administers programs of scholarships and fellowships.

Grant seekers should review World Bank and Civil Society. Information includes a guide to funding resources, and contact information for the Bank’s civil society focal points.

The Bank’s web pages for Countries usually include contact information at the country level, as well as other information that may be useful to grant seekers.

 

Address

THE WORLD BANK

1818 H Street, NW Washington,

DC 20433 USA.

Telephone

Tel : (202) 473-1000

 

 

 

 

Directory of International Donors Funding the Youth Sector

SECTION 1: The International Donor Community

1.1.1 The United Nations System

THE UN PROGRAM ON YOUTH

The UN Program on Youth was established to:

  • enhance awareness of the global situation of youth and increase recognition of the rights and aspirations of youth;
  • promote national youth policies, national youth coordinating mechanisms and national youth programs of action as integral parts of social and eco­nomic development, in cooperation with both governmental and nongov­ernmental organizations; and
  • strengthen the participation of youth in decision-making processes at all levels in order to increase their impact on national development and inter­national cooperation.

Its main responsibilities include:

  • The publication of the World Youth Report;
  • The preparation of activities to celebrate International Youth Day every year;
  • The monitoring of progress toward and support for efforts to implement the WPAY;
  • consulting and advising other UN units on youth issues;
  • Assistance to governments preparing youth ministerial conferences (i.e., participation in proposed steering groups, and the like);
  • The organization of occasional events, conferences and forums.

UN Program on Youth has no direct grant-making activities. No informa­tion is available in the public domain concerning its operational budget. Its activities are funded from the general budget of the UN through the division in which it is located, e.g., the Department for Social and Economic Affairs, which has four professional and one general member of staff.

For more information visit:

www.un.org/esa/socdev/unyin/agenda.htm

www.un.org/esa/socdev/unyin/mandate.htm

UN GRANT-MAKING INITIATIVES FOR YOUTH

·         The Alliance of Civilizations (AoC)

www.unaoc.org

The AoC was established in 2005 by the governments of Spain and Turkey under the auspices of the UN.The AoC aims to improve understanding and cooperative relations among nations and peoples across cultures and religions and, in the process, to help counter the forces that cause polariza­tion and extremism. Working with all social partners, the Alliance sup­ports a range of projects and initiatives aimed at building bridges among diverse cultures and communities.

 

 

For more information:

 

www.unaoc.org

 

 

  • AoC Youth Solidarity Fund

 

The AoC has launched a Youth Solidarity Fund, which provides seed funding in amounts up to US$20,000 to a small number of outstanding youth-led projects in the fields of intercultural and inter-religious ex­change, youth leadership training, and youth voices in the media. Proj­ects must have long-term goals that help youth from disenfranchised communities to overcome perceived or real cultural and religious di­vides, and must be entirely managed by young people for the benefit of young people. The aim of this competitive funding mechanism is to facilitate genuine bridge-building among young people of different cultural and religious backgrounds.

The Youth Solidarity Fund provides funding for projects that are en­tirely managed by young people for the benefit of young people be­tween the ages of 18 and 35.To be eligible, applicants must:

  • be membership-based youth organizations (youth-led or primarily youth-serving) or a network composed of several youth-led organi­zations;
  • be nongovernmental organizations (with the exception of national youth councils) registered in the country of operation as a charity, trust, foundation, or association, that have funded and implemented projects for a minimum of one year;
  • have a democratic governance structure that nominates leaders and implements formal priorities and member policies;
  • demonstrate proper and consistent record-keeping of its activities, including minutes and accounts;
  • monitor, evaluate, and assess the impact of activities and projects;
  • reflect gender perspective and balance in staff and membership;
  • not adhere to or have affiliations with violent ideologies or antago­nism against any particular country, religion, ethnic group, color, or sex.

 

For more information visit:

 

www.unaoc.org/content/view/93/128/lang,english/

www.unaoc.org

 

YOUTH @ UN HUMAN SETTLEMENTS PROGRAM (UN-HABITAT)

UN-HABITAT is the UN agency for human settlements. Mandated by the UN General Assembly, it promotes socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities that provide adequate shelter for all. UN-HABITAT recog­nizes young people as active participants in the future of human settlements. UN-HABITAT initiates and fosters interagency partnerships with youth orga­nizations. It engages young people at an international level to help formulate an international understanding of pressing youth issues. Working with young men and women and understanding their diverse abilities, realities, and expe­riences is an essential element of UN-HABITAT’s long-term success of achiev­ing sustainable urbanization. Young people need acknowledgment, guidance, resources, and training in order to reach their full potential. UN-HABITAT has a Youth Strategy for Enhanced Engagement, an integrated approach to ur­ban youth development that guides the operations of the agency when work­ing with young people. This strategy provides a road map for the promotion of urban youth empowerment.

For more information visit:

www.unhabitat.org/content.asp?typeid=19&catid=531&cid=4421

 

  • UN-HABITAT: Opportunities Fund for Youth-Led Development

The Opportunities Fund for Youth-Led Development was officially estab­lished by the UN-HABITAT Governing Council (GC resolution 21/6) in 2007, in direct response to requests from youth, including those attending the Third World Urban Forum (Vancouver, 2006).Championed by Nor­way, this fund has US$1 million to spend annually in support of initiatives promoting youth leadership in sustainable urban development. The aim of the fund is to promote leadership and participation of young women and men in achieving sustainable urbanization. The fund bridges the policy-practice divide by promoting model youth-led projects that demonstrate the global community’s commitment to youth, and Governments agreed that a new fund to expand the agency’s youth programs would be created to:

  • strengthen youth-related policy formulation;
  • build the capacities of governments, civil society organizations, and the private sector to better address youth concerns, and support new infor­mation and communication for young people;
  • test new approaches to employment, good governance, adequate shelter, and secure tenure, and promote the sharing of best practices;
  • promote vocational training and credit mechanisms to encourage entre­preneurship and employment for young women and men, in collabora­tion with the private sector and with other UN bodies.

 

For more information visit:

www.unhabitat.org/youthfund.

 

www.unhabitat.org/content.asp?typeid=19&catid=531&cid=6329

 

1.1.2 AGENCIES WITH IMPORTANT OPERATIONAL PROGRAMS AND GRANT-MAKING

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)

UNESCO’s objective is to empower young people by reaching out to them, re­sponding to their expectations and ideas, and fostering useful and long-lasting skills.UNESCO encourages the participation of youth and their engagement in dialogue.It also supports the integration of youth concerns and issues into the policy agendas of member states in education, the sciences, culture, and communication in order to create spaces and opportunities for empowering young people and giving recognition, visibility, and credibility to their con­tributions.UNESCO’s youth program focuses on interagency cooperation, cooperation with NGOs, youth forum(s), and youth policies and programs.UNESCO does not offer grants for youth-related initiatives, although it has an elaborate operational program that organizes training, convening, and youth policy-related activities.From 1999, UNESCO operated a small grants facility for young people and youth organizations to conduct projects related to HIV/AIDS, but it appears to have been discontinued.If an international nongov­ernmental organization (INGO) active in the field of youth has operational relations with UNESCO, it may request assistance for specific activities from UNESCO’s Participation Program.

 

For more information visit;

 

www.unesco.org/en/youth

 

  • UNESCO’s Participation Program

The Participation Program enables member states to carry out impor­tant projects, particularly in the organization’s main areas of competence. Through this program UNESCO aims to:

  • achieve its objectives by participating in the sub regional, inter-regional, and regional projects, led by its member states and directly related to the activities of the organization;
  • strengthen the partnership between the organization and its member states as well as between the organization and INGOs;
  • boost the actions of the national commissions for UNESCO;
  • achieve better visibility of UNESCO’s action in its member states.

The Participation Program helps to invigorate the action of the national commissions for UNESCO, release creative energies in a number of fields, and mobilize efforts in pursuing and implementing projects of current interest. Projects and action plans may be submitted by member states, by several member states from one region (for regional projects), or by INGOs that have formal or operational relations with UNESCO (the list of eligible INGOs is established by UNESCO’s executive committee).Propos­als must relate to UNESCO’s major programs, its interdisciplinary projects, its activities on behalf of Africa, the least-developed countries, youth and women, or the activities of the national commissions for UNESCO.

The different types of assistance that can be requested under the Participa­tion Program are:

  • Specialists and consultants, not including staff costs;
  • Study grants and fellowships;
  • Publications, periodicals, documentation, translation, and reproduction;
  • Supplies and equipment (other than vehicles);
  • Conferences, meetings, translation, and interpretation services, partici­pants’ travel costs (not including those of UNESCO staff members);
  • Seminars and training courses.

 

 

For more information visit:

 

http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=32042&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

 

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF)

UNICEF is mandated by the UN General Assembly to advocate for the pro­tection of children’s rights, to help meet their basic needs, and to expand their opportunities to reach their full potential under the guidance of the UN Con­vention on the Rights of the Child.It strives to establish children’s rights as enduring ethical principles and international standards of behavior by mobi­lizing political will and resources.UNICEF recognizes that young people are speaking out and taking active leadership roles throughout society.UNICEF works with and for adolescents to promote their rights to meaningful partici­pation and positive development.Officially, UNICEF works with young people up to age 18, but many of its projects also work with older young people.At the international level, UNICEF does not conduct grant-making activities.How­ever, it has several large-scale operational programs that support youth devel­opment and youth participation in development.

 

For more information visit:

 

www.unicef.org

 

  • The Junior 8 Summits (J8)

UNICEF organizes the J8 Summits each year in conjunction with G8 Sum­mits.Young people take part in workshops, roundtable discussions, and participatory exercises to help them grapple with and agree on the priority issues and recommendations on the G8 agenda.At the end of their dis­

cussions, the J8 delegates write a report outlining their conclusions and recommendations, which is presented to the G8 leaders in a face-to-face dialogue.Topics in the J8 agenda have included education, HIV/AIDS, cli­mate change, development in Africa, tolerance, and global health.Partici­pants to the J8 Summit include teams of young people representing the G8 countries as well as a delegation of young people from non-G8 countries representing the various regions of the world.Each year, the details of the Junior 8 Summit are determined by the G8 host government collaborating with UNICEF.

For more information and updates:

 www.j8summit.com

www.j8summit.com/about-j8-summit

  • Voices of Youth (VoY)

Since 1995, the VoY website has focused on exploring the educational and community-building potential of the Internet, and facilitating the active and substantive participation of young people in discussions on child rights and development-related issues.Through web boards, interactive quizzes, youth leadership profiles, live chats and more, VoY provides thousands of young people from over 180 countries with an opportunity to self-inform, engage in lively debate, and partner with their peers and decision makers, in particular in relation of HIV/AIDS and the themes of the WPAY.

  • Focus on HIV/AIDS: UNICEF is very active in the area of children and adolescents and HIV/AIDS.In close collaboration with partners, UNICEF provides support to scale up efforts to prevent mother-to-child transmis­sion of HIV; promote pediatric HIV diagnosis and treatment, as well as the protection, care, and support for children affected by AIDS; and prevent HIV transmission in adolescents in over 100 countries.
  • Other themes: UNICEF’s activities span most areas of the WPAY, includ­ing education, the environment, substance use, justice for children and adolescents, girls and young women, and armed conflict.

For more information visit:

www.unicef.org/voy

www.j8summit.com

 

UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND (UNFPA)

UNFPA promotes and protects the rights of young people.It envisions a world in which adolescents and young people of both sexes have optimal oppor­tunities to develop their full potential, to freely express themselves and have their views respected, and to live free of poverty, discrimination, and violence.UNFPA works to empower adolescents and youth and promote health, includ­ing sexual and reproductive health.UNFPA takes a holistic, multisectoral, col­laborative approach, framing adolescent and youth issues within the larger de­velopment context of poverty reduction.Its programs advocate for an essential package of social protection interventions for youth that includes education, sexual and reproductive health services, support for establishing livelihoods, and intergenerational alliances.

To achieve this, UNFPA works across sectors and with many partners to:

  • empower adolescents and youth with skills to achieve their dreams, think critically, and express themselves freely;
  • promote health by giving youth access to sexual and reproductive health information, education, commodities, and services;
  • connect young people to livelihood and employment programs;
  • uphold the rights of young people, especially girls and marginalized groups, to grow up healthy and safe so that they can receive a fair share of social investments;
  • encourage young people’s leadership and participation in decisions that af­fect them, including the development plans of their societies.

Its main areas of operational work with or on youth and adolescents are youth participation, education and empowerment, youth-friendly sexual and repro­ductive health services, policy initiatives, adolescent girls, HIV/AIDS, manag­ing in times of crisis, and international agreements.

For more information visit:

www.unfpa.org/about/funding.htm.

www.unfpa.org/adolescents/index.htm

 

  • UNFPA Special Youth Program

UNFPA has initiated the Special Youth Program, which recruits outstand­ing young people ages 20 to 24 from developing countries to join UNFPA for a nine-month paid fellowship that is divided between UNFPA’s New York headquarters and their home country.Through this program, UNFPA engages young people in policy development and programming and builds their capacity and leadership skills in addressing population, sexual and reproductive health, and gender issues.

 

For more information visit:

www.unfpa.org/adolescents/participation.htm

 

  • The Youth Peer Education Network (Y-PEER)

Y-PEER is a comprehensive youth-to-youth initiative pioneered by the UNFPA.Y-PEER is a network of more than 600 nonprofit organizations, schools, and governmental institutions; its membership includes more than 7,300 young people from 40 countries who work in the many areas of adolescent sexual and reproductive health. Members of Y-PEER include young people who are active peer educators, trainers of trainers and youth advocates for adolescent sexual and reproductive health. These young peo­ple contribute to and benefit from the resource materials, tools, training programs, and campaigns provided by the Y-PEER networks nationally and internationally.

Y-PEER is based on person-to-person meetings, and electronic communi­cation via an interactive website and national and international listservs. The website and listservs provide peer educators with access to state-of-the-art information on peer education, prevention of STIs and HIV/AIDS, and other sexual and reproductive health-related topics. Y-PEER also of­fers computer-based distance learning courses; hosts training events, cam­paigns, workshops and videoconferences; and produces tools that facili­tate peer education, youth-adult partnerships, “edutainment,” and youth advocacy. It builds partnerships in order to advocate for national youth development strategies; increased access to information, knowledge, and services on sexual and reproductive health; the sharing of lessons learned across borders and between cultures; standards of practice and improved training resources for peer educators; and the strengthening of the knowl­edge base of peer educators and trainers of trainers.

For information visit:

www.unfpa.org/adolescents/participation.htm

www.youthpeer.org/web/guest/home

 

 

 

 

THE WORLD BANK AND THE WORLD BANK GROUP (WBG)

By the early 2000s senior management at the World Bank had become aware that the bank needed to address the children and youth agenda in a more sys­tematic and integrated manner.The Children & Youth (C&Y) team was es­tablished in late 2002 within the Human Development Network to guide and

foster coordination and partnerships that contribute to more effective children and youth development work. Main objectives are:

  • to provide the World Bank with a strategic framework for action in the area of C&Y;
  • to support regions in developing, implementing, and monitoring C&Y operational plans;
  • to improve coordination among sectors, networks, and regional work;
  • to ensure consistency with companion development strategies in human development, social protection, social development, urban strategies, gender, and other sectoral groups;
  • to provide effective and innovative knowledge manage­ment;
  • to promote improved C&Y learning outcomes across sectors and countries;
  • to contribute to shaping the World Bank’s collaboration on C&Y issues with other international agencies and donors;
  • to raise additional funds; and
  • to facilitate dialogue with children and youth world­wide, especially in developing countries.

 

 

For more information:

http://go.worldbank.org/Z12D7RZVZ0

 http://go.worldbank.org/RVVTZLXKK0.

The World Bank has several funding mechanisms for financ­ing youth-led projects and initiatives.

  • The Civil Society Fund (CSF)

CSF (formerly known as the Small Grants Program) is managed out of approximately 70 countries with some 400 grants awarded annually.A grant—averaging US$4,000—provides seed funding for innovative ac­tivities that enable citizens’ groups to initiate programs that enhance and influence development outcomes.The program emphasizes activities that strengthen partnerships with the public and the private sectors, as well as with other civil society organizations.Youth civic engagement remains a high priority, as many Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) chose to focus their CSF activities on youth.In FY08 CSF began to manage a US$3 mil­lion dollar grants portfolio of the Global Public-Private Partnership and Multi-Donor Trust Fund for Youth Investment.

 

For more information visit:

http://go.worldbank.org/U7ZGIQEZ10

http://go.worldbank.org/GU6VZREZ40

  • The Global (Public-Private) Partnership for Youth Investment (GPYI)

GPYI is a formal, enduring relationship between partner organizations that share a common mission—to improve the lives of young people through their economic advancement and social inclusion. GPYI is supported by

companies, foundations, civil society organizations, private corporations, philanthropists, and international organizations. As host of the GPYI, the World Bank Group (WBG) enables the use of its resources (financial, technical, and staff), its name, reputation, and access points to achieve the GPYI’s goals. The next round of funding, to be disbursed in 2010, has been earmarked for activities in Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

For information visit:

http://go.worldbank.org/NVHL1NT170

www.lac-developmentmarketplace.org

  • Youth 2 Youth Community

The Youth 2 Youth Community is a network of young World Bank em­ployees working in partnership with other young people outside the orga­nization to further the interests of youth in the development context. The community serves as a mechanism to channel the ideas of internal young staff into the World Bank, channel the ideas of external young people into the World Bank, and build partnerships between these two groups. The community also provides a professional and social network for young pro­fessionals interested in development, as well as a place to enhance learning opportunities.

 

For information visit:

http://go.worldbank.org/HQB6GE24C0

 

  • Youth Voices: Youth Consultative Groups at the Country Level

Following the initiative of the World Bank’s Peru office, Youth Voices groups are active in 15 countries. The establishment of Youth Voices groups is—by definition—a country-led and country-owned process. The groups en­gage in a variety of activities depending on the country context. Generally, they are active in providing input to country assistance strategies and other policies that target or affect young people.The World Bank is considering offering Youth Voices groups with innovative ideas for relevant projects mini-grants of between US$500 to $1,000.Such support will help Youth

Voices groups to engage in activities relevant to the World Bank and young people.

For more information visit:

http://go.worldbank.org/3100EZ9FI0

  • Post-Conflict Fund (PCF) and Low-Income Countries under Stress Fund (LICUS)

Because innovative work in uncertain and fragile conflict-affected societ­ies is often not possible through normal World Bank funding sources, the PCF supports planning, piloting, and analysis of groundbreaking activities by funding government and partner organizations in the forefront of this work.The emphasis is on speed and flexibility without sacrificing quality.

PCF was established in 1997 to enhance the World Bank’s ability to support countries in transition from conflict to sustainable peace and economic growth.The PCF makes grants to a wide range of partners (institutions, NGOs, UN agencies, transitional authorities, governments, and other civil society institutions) to provide earlier and broader World Bank assistance to conflict-affected countries.

Grants are focused on restoring the lives and livelihood of war-affected populations, with a premium placed on innovative approaches to conflict and partnerships with donors and executing agencies; and leveraging re­sources through a variety of funding arrangements.

For more information:

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTSOCIALDEVELOPMENT/EXTCPR/0,,contentMDK:20486203~menuPK:1260916~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:407740,00.html

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION, DEPARTMENT OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT (CAH)

 

CAH envisions a world in which children and adolescents enjoy the highest attainable standard of health and development, a world that meets their needs and respects their rights, enabling them to live to their full potential.CAH promotes the physical and mental health of adolescents, and aims to reduce by 25% HIV prevalence among young people ages 15 to 24 years by 2010.The CAH’s work is guided by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).CAH works to strengthen the tracking of adolescent health issues by developing and disseminating evidence for action to policy makers and program managers, by advocating for concerted action based on evidence, and by providing techni­cal assistance to support a systematic approach to scaling up the provision and use of quality health services to adolescents.This work includes developing consensus among key stakeholders, developing national standards for adoles­cent and youth-friendly health services, and supporting efforts to achieve these standards by:

  • training health workers to deal with adolescents effectively and sensitively;
  • making health facilities welcoming to adolescents; and
  • generating adolescent demand for health services and community accep­tance for their provision.

In addition, CAH supports the collection and analysis of data to monitor implementation and progress towards global goals and targets of relevance to adolescents.CAH works with other units in the World Health Organization (WHO) and in partnership with sister agencies such as UNFPA and UNICEF, as well as those outside the UN system.

For more information;

www.who.int/child_adolescent_health/en

  • Global Youth Network for Road Safety

A Global Road Safety Facility has been established in collaboration with the World Bank. The three-year project will disburse US$10 million through two separate funding streams, one for global work and one for na­tional work. The project will initially be managed by the World Bank, with

Advisory input from a number of partner organizations. In 2008, WHO received a grant to support the establishment of a formal youth-led net­work for road safety.It is planned that this network will evolve into a fully fledged NGO.A taskforce has been created to give guidance on overall strategic direction and to help the network define its mission, goals, objec­tives, and activities. The youth network is currently represented on the UN Road Safety Collaboration by the vice chair of the April 2007 World Youth Assembly for Road Safety. On 25–26 March 2009, WHO hosted the first meeting of the taskforce, which is comprised of young road safety leaders from Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, The Gambia, Lebanon, and the U.S. Most were nominated as their country’s official delegate to the April 2007 World Youth Assembly for Road Safety. The creation of the global network is a direct follow-up to this high profile global advocacy event. The network aims to support young road safety advocates in all countries by in­creasing collaboration across global, regional, and local levels. During the two-day meeting, the taskforce discussed the opportunities and challenges presented by creation of the Global Youth Network.

BRITISH COUNCIL

The British Council was formed in 1934 to promote a wider knowledge of the UK abroad, to promote knowledge of the English language, and to develop closer cultural relations between the UK and other countries. No figures are available in the public domain for the volume of funding being spent by the British Council on these projects, but according to its website the British Coun­cil’s overall program of activities worldwide reaches over 112 million people. At the same time as hosting the national agency for the implementation of the European Commission’s Youth in Action program in the United Kingdom

(through Connect Youth), the British Council runs several large-scale opera­tional programs that provide a framework for young people to become active at the international level, whether through their own projects or the programs provided by the British Council. The most relevant programs are:

  • International Climate Champions

British Council’s International Climate Champions is a program that works in 60 countries across the globe, with young people who are passionate and committed to action on climate change. The British Council provides them with training and support to develop and implement projects within their local communities that raise awareness of climate change, limit the impact of climate change (adaptation), and reduce carbon footprint (mitigation).International Climate Champions spend a year working with their local communities carrying out projects that raise awareness of climate change and crucially encourage people to change their behavior. As well as work­ing in their local area, International Climate Champions meet with local and national leaders to share their experiences. Some champions have the chance to express their views to world leaders at international meetings, such as the UN Conference on Climate Change in Copenhagen in Decem­ber 2009.Champions vary in age in different countries but are between 11 and 35 years. During 2009, the British Council was working with cham­pions in a total of 60 countries across the globe, and membership of the network grew to more than 2000.

For more information:

www.britishcouncil.de/icc/index.htm

www.britishcouncil.org/connectyouth


  • Global Xchange

The British Council finances an extensive international youth voluntary service exchange program called Global Xchange, which co-finances young people from the UK and participating countries around the world ages 18 to 25 to go abroad and work on a concrete voluntary project in another community.

 

For more information :

www.globalxchange.org.uk

  • International Inspiration

International Inspiration is a ₤9 million investment program to support sports projects in five developing countries around the world .The pilot programs are taking place in Azerbaijan, Brazil, India, Palau, and Zambia. Funding for the pilot program, which runs until 2010 and is being led by UK Sport, the government’s international sports agency, includes contributions from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), UNICEF, the British Council, the Football Association (FA) Pre­mier League, and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS).The program is designed to create opportunities for children and young people of all abilities from the world’s most disadvantaged communities to enrich their lives by playing and excelling in sports. Each pilot country benefits from a number of mutually agreed programs in these areas:

  • Physical education in schools and school links;
  • Sports development and sporting excellence;
  • Human and social development through sports.

 For more information;

     www.britishcouncil.org/sport-international-inspiration-home.htm

  • Skills for Employability

Skills for Employability is a British Council program that addresses the de­mand for skills in a global economy so that national and training systems are better able to respond to labor market demands and learner needs. The program focuses on building strong relationships with industry and em­ployers, governments and training providers. The program has four core ar­eas: policy dialogue, professional networks, institutional partnerships, and enterprise and technology awards. Skills for Employability is currently op­erating in many countries across Southeastern Europe, Central and South Asia, the Middle East, Near East and North Africa, China, and East Asia, and will expand into other regions in 2011.Young people are an important beneficiary group because of their school-to-work transitions and the high level of youth unemployment in the regions where the program is active.

For more information:

      www.britishcouncil.org/nepal-programmes-skills-for-employability.htm

THE COMMONWEALTH

The Commonwealth, founded in 1949, is an association of 53 independent states consulting and cooperating in the common interests of their peoples and in the promotion of international understanding. Commonwealth states were formerly British colonies. As independent states they decided to join the association voluntarily. The Commonwealth Secretariat, established in 1965, is the main intergovernmental agency of the Commonwealth, facilitating consul­tation and cooperation among member governments and countries. The asso­ciation has always focused on investing in youth, and has had a youth program since the founding of the Secretariat.

For more information:  www.thecommonwealth.org

  • Commonwealth Youth Program (CYP)

The CYP works with young people up to age 24 to help them to become ac­tive citizens and to fully participate in development projects that create op­portunities for themselves and their communities.CYP operates through its main Commonwealth office (at the Commonwealth Secretariat in Lon­don) and four regional centers—in Zambia for Africa, in India for Asia, in Guyana for the Caribbean, and in the Solomon Islands for the Pacific.CYP focuses on three strategic program areas: youth enterprise and sustainable livelihoods; governance, development, and youth network; and youth work education and training. It also works toward enhancing youth participa­tion, the development of evidence-based policymaking, the use of sports to deal with social problems (e.g., exclusion, HIV/AIDS, etc.), the use of technology to its best potential, and the development of standards.

For more information:

www.thecommonwealth.org/subhomepage/152816/ www.thecommonwealth.org/document/181889/34293/35144/152092/215870/report_of_the_commonwealth_secretarygeneral_2009.htm.

(IAF): INTERNATIONAL ASTRONAUTICAL CONGRESS (IAC) 2009 YOUTH GRANTS PROGRAM

In October 2008 the member organizations of the IAF approved a new initia­tive to support the next generation of students and young professionals who aspire to be the future leaders of the international space community. As part of this initiative, the IAF has initiated a program to provide grants that enable students and young space professionals to participate in IAF activities, in par­ticular the IAC. The initiative also envisions the creation of several new awards that recognize achievement by young people in the pursuit and promotion of global space activities. The IAC 2009 Youth Grants Program was open to in­dividuals between the ages of 21 and 33 on 1 January 2009.Candidates could apply regardless of their home country or current residence. While all applica­tions were considered, the IAF through this program encouraged applications from candidates in nations with emerging space capabilities and interests who would otherwise not be able to attend the IAC. The young people selected par­ticipated in the 60th IAC, which took place in Daejeon, Republic of Korea, in October. The individuals selected were given the opportunity to participate in other activities held just before and during the Congress.

 

For more information visit:

www.iafastro.org/index.php?id=632

 

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION OF THE FRANCOPHONIE [ORGANISATION INTERNATIONALE DE LA FRANCOPHONIE] (OIF)

The OIF brings together 55 member states and governments and 13 observer states around their common language, French, spoken by 200 million people worldwide and the official language of 32 OIF member states. It has an op­erational youth program that supports the development of young people’s active and responsible citizenship and works with youth up to the age of 30.OIF’s three main areas of youth programming youth are: (1) meetings among

French-speaking young people about issues of society, politics, and policymak­ing that concern them; (2) technical assistance to member states to reinforce their national and international youth policies; and (3) support and encour­agement of French-speaking young people to get involved in the Francophonie volunteer program (Voluntariat Francophone).

 For more information visit:

www.francophonie.org/actions/developpement/ini-jeunesse.cfm

 www.francophonie.org/ressources/programmation.cfm.

1.2 INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCING FOR YOUTH AND YOUTH-RELATED PROJECTS

1.2.1 Youth-Specific Funders Conducting Grant-Making

This section introduces philanthropic organizations and donors that provide grants for youth-run and youth-led projects, with an international character or with a global dimension. It also introduces several organizations that take an integrated approach to childhood and youth, and provide support for work focusing on children and young people.

 

ASHOKA

ASHOKA, which promotes social entrepreneurship, provides outstanding in­dividuals with funding to grow and develop as social entrepreneurs.Social en­trepreneurs tackle problems in all areas of need: the environment, health, learn­ing, human rights, civic engagement, and economic development.Founded by Bill Drayton in the U.S.in 1980, ASHOKA has an annual budget that grew to US$30 million in 2006, from $50,000 at the time of its founding.

 

For more information visit:

www.ashoka.org

 www.ashoka.org/printroom.

www.francophonie.org/actions/developpement/ini-jeunesse.cfm

 

  • Youth Venture

Youth Venture, which is an ASHOKA initiative directed at young people, helps teams of people start new youth-led organizations.It invests in teams of young people to design and launch social ventures, through which they gain experience and contribute to positive social change.Venturers start businesses, civil society organizations, and informal programs that ad­dress all kinds of social issues, including poverty, health, the elderly, the environment, education, diversity issues, and the arts.Youth Venturers are networked globally through events and a special website, adding an inter­national dimension to this project.Youth Venture offers teams of young people who are ready:

  • seed funding of up to US$1,000;
  • Guidance, tools, and support;
  • mentors who provide advice and expertise;
  • A supportive network of fellow Youth Venturers;
  • Identity as part of movement toward youth-led social change.

Youth Venture operates in the U.S., Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, India, South Africa, Thailand, and across Europe.The public information does not in­dicate how many Youth Venture grants have been made since the program began or in the current year.

GLOBAL YOUTH COALITION ON HIV/AIDS (GYCA)

GYCA runs a small-grants program to help young leaders working on HIV to implement projects in their communities with the support of the Ameri­can Jewish World Service.In 2008, the program made it possible for GYCA to assist ten young graduates of their e-courses to implement projects that ad­dress documented needs in their communities and to learn the basics of grant management and reporting.Projects included awareness raising about HIV/AIDS among young women in Pakistan and a voluntary counseling and test­61 1.2 International Foundations and Organizations Providing Financing for Youth and Youth-Related Projects

ing campaign in a rural area in Rwanda, among a number of other initiatives.Ten additional grants of US$1,500 were made in 2009 and 2010.Applicants are young persons, members of GYCA, 29 years old or younger, who have com­pleted at least one GYCA e-course, a training equivalent to a GYCA e-course related to leading a project, and a two-day planning and management session, or who have experience in leading a youth organization on HIV and AIDS is­sues.Projects address a documented need in the community; work with mar­ginalized populations; have specific, measurable, and time-bound objectives; include a focus on gender equality; have indicators in place for monitoring and evaluation; take an evidence-based and human rights-based approach; and are sustainable after the funding period ends.GYCA favors applicants who reside in a developing country where funding is not easily accessible; are living with HIV or belong to a marginalized group; are connected with a local, well-estab­lished NGO; and are committed to sharing their skills with their peers.

 

For more information:

www.youthaidscoalition.org/page/smallgrants

 

THE INTERNATIONAL YOUTH FOUNDATION (IYF)

The IYF is working in more than 70 countries and territories to improve the conditions and prospects of young people.Established in 1990 to bring world­wide resources to young people in need, IYF works with companies, founda­tions, and civic organizations to strengthen existing programs that are mak­ing a positive and lasting difference in young lives.IYF’s program activity is clustered around the following four issues, which form the core of IYF’s global youth initiatives:

  • Education to improve the quality of education and increase learning oppor­tunities for young people—both in and out of school—through expanded access to information technology, innovative school reform, and instruc­tional support for teachers.
  • Employability to improve young people’s employment, entrepreneurial, and personal skills as a way to build their capacity for and engagement in pro­ductive work.
  • Leadership and Engagement to inspire, support, and promote youth en­gagement and the role of young people as leaders of positive social change, as a way to foster a lifelong commitment to active citizenship.
  • Health Education and Awareness to prepare children and youth to lead healthy lives by providing them with the knowledge and personal skills needed to make informed and healthy choices.

The IYF relies heavily on corporate alliances to fund its operational programs and to ensure its grant-making bud­get.Its corporate alliances include:

  • Wrigley/IYF: Youth.Empowerment.Success.(Y.E.S.) Program
  • Goldman Sachs Foundation: school clubs and enter­prises program
  • Intel: Computer Clubhouse
  • GE Foundation: Life Skills for Employability Program
  • Alcatel-Lucent Foundation/IYF: Global Fund for Youth Development
  • Merrill Lynch & Co.Foundation, Inc.
  • MMO2/IYF: “What Youth Can Do” Program
  • Nokia: Equipping Young People with Essential Life Skills
  • Porter Novelli: YouthActionNet®
  • St.Paul Travelers: Youth Investors Program
  • Travelport’s Dissemination Technologies Program

For more information visit:

www.iyfnet.org/section.cfm/5

www.iyfnet.org/section.cfm/260.

www.nokia.com/A4254327

W.K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION

The W.K.Kellogg Foundation, established in 1930, has a Youth and Education Grant-Making Program, which aims to improve learning outcomes for vulner­able children and youth.Kellogg supports new ideas about how to engage chil­dren and youth in learning and new ways to bring together community-based systems that promote learning.

For more information visit:  www.wkkf.org/Default.aspx?LanguageID=0

  • Youth and Education Grant-Making Program

The purpose of the Youth and Education Program is to improve learning outcomes for vulnerable children and youth.The focus of general grant-making in Youth and Education is innovation.The Kellogg Foundation supports new ideas about how to engage children and youth in learning

and new ways to bring together community-based systems that promote learning.Applicants may apply online on a rolling basis and must submit information about the following dimensions of their project:

  • how and why the project is innovative;
  • how the project engages community stakeholders to achieve the mission;
  • how the project is trying to impact or change the system;
  • how leadership strategies will be used to increase the impact of change efforts, to develop partnerships, and to align community aspirations with formal and informal institutions;
  • how the project is to be evaluated, how the team will learn from the project, and how the project’s achievements and issues will be commu­nicated to other audiences.

For more information:

www.wkkf.org/default.aspx?tabid=1163&ItemID=176&NID=342&LanguageID=0.

 

WESTMINSTER FOUNDATION FOR DEMOCRACY (WFD)   

The WFD works to achieve sustainable political change in emerging democra­cies. It is an independent political foundation, sponsored by the United King­dom Foreign and Commonwealth Office .Working with and through partner 65 1.2 International Foundations and Organizations Providing Financing for Youth and Youth-Related Projects

organizations, it seeks to strengthen the institutions of democracy, principally political parties, parliaments, and the range of institutions that make up civil society—nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), trade unions, free media, etc.WFD supports activities in the fields of local government, civic participa­tion, women, youth, elections, rule of law, media, and trade unions .In many of the countries in which WFD is supporting democratic change, the key to progress is the talent and energy of the young people.WFD has supported numerous projects with young people, such as leadership training for young activists and projects encouraging youth to be engaged in political life and the development of their communities. Applications for funding are accepted on a rolling basis according to annually identified priorities for each country or re­gion. Initial contact is made with the WFD staff member or team in the region, then funding opportunities are explored.

Two examples of youth-specific projects funded by WFD are:

  • The Liberal Democrats & Youth Training in Africa: The Liberal Democrats organized a youth training workshop for the Africa Liberal Network.This project brought together leaders of political youth groups from 13 African countries, ranging from Angola to Morocco and Tanzania in Lusaka, Zambia, and 14 political parties.The program focused on developing the participants’ campaign skills.The mix of governing and opposition parties, and parties from southern, east, and west Africa allowed an effective exchange of ideas and solu­tions.The use of African (as well as UK) trainers—both independent and from partner parties—made it possible to focus on capacity building and finding local solutions to local problems.Participants improved their skills in public speaking, communication, building and leading a team, working with the me­dia, organizing election campaigns, presentation, and identifying issues.In a mock press conference, they quizzed fellow participants posing as journalists in the audience.This exercise allowed the delegates to practice some of the skills learned, and additional one-to-one interviews recorded on-camera and then reviewed let the participants see their progress.
  • Training Young Political Leaders in Moldova: Political party leadership prac­tices in Moldova lack value-based standards for promoting individuals and ideas, making it difficult for young activists to participate fully in party activi­ties, to make a contribution to the party, and steadily assume greater respon­sibility.Political leaders and elites are reluctant to share power, which has led to fragmentation of the political scene.Opportunities for young politicians are limited to basic campaign activities.WFD supported a project that provided youth members of Moldovan political parties with the ability to assert them­selves within their organizations.It also aimed to strengthen political parties through empowering young party leaders and to promote a value-based and democratic party system in Moldova.Activities included leadership training sessions for young party members and civil society activists, as well as a sum­mer school with a mock electoral campaign.The knowledge acquired by the participants enabled them to conduct follow-up activities within their parties.One activist conducted training for other youth members of her party, while another hosted a summer school for young activists from rural areas.Numer­ous participants were also subsequently promoted within their parties; some are now running as candidates in different elections, one has been appointed deputy chair of their party’s youth branch, and one non-party participant has joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

For information:

www.wfd.org/pages/standard.aspx?i_PageID=13331.

www.wfd.org/pages/standard.aspx?i_PageID=144

 

1.2.2. NON-YOUTH SPECIFIC ORGANIZATIONS CONDUCTING GRANT-MAKING FOR YOUTH-LED PROJECT

CHARLES STEWART MOTT FOUNDATION (CSM)

CSM believes that learning how people can live together most effectively is one of the fundamental needs of humanity.In so doing, people create a sense of community or belonging.CSM endeavors to enhance the capacity of individu­als, families, or institutions at the local level and beyond.The foundation’s aim is to promote collective work in any program area that could lead to systemic change.The foundation’s mission is to support efforts that promote a just, eq­uitable, and sustainable society.It runs three main grant-making programs rel­evant for youth:

Civil society: To support efforts to assist in democratic institution-building, strengthen communities, promote equitable access to resources, and ensure the respect of rights and diversity.

Environment: To support the efforts of engaged citizens who create account­able and responsive institutions, sound public policies, and appropriate models of development that protect the diversity and integrity of selected ecosystems in North America and around the world.

For more information:

www.mott.org

FORD FOUNDATION

The Ford Foundation makes grants and loans to build knowledge and strength­en organizations and networks.It seeks to be a long-term and flexible partner with innovative leaders of thought and action.It makes grants from its New York headquarters and regional offices in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, and Russia.Relevant fields of work include community development, environment, civil society, human rights, education, arts and culture, media, HIV/AIDS, sexuality, and reproductive health.Ford Foundation-funded proj­ects can be youth-led, and beneficiaries are also young people, although it does not have a designated youth project-funding program.

For more information:

 

www.fordfound.org

European Foundation Centre/Ford Foundation;

www.efc.be/webready/FORD001.html.

Rockefeller Brothers Fund;

www.rbf.org/guidelines/guidelines_show.htm?cat_id=1662&doc_id=495551.

Ford Foundation;

www.fordfound.org/about

www.fordfound.org/about/financials.

KING BAUDOUIN FOUNDATION

 

The foundation is described as “an independent structure that encourages orig­inal ideas and sets up new projects” in its 1976 constitution.As a result it sup­ports projects and individuals who are committed to creating a better society.It tries to make a lasting contribution towards greater justice, democracy, and respect for diversity.Based in Brussels, the foundation supports projects inter­nationally.By working with different organizations, the foundation broadens its capacity for support.Until the year 2000, a key focus was combating poverty and the social exclusion of youth.The foundation provided support for young people, including those from immigrant backgrounds, to learn new life skills, to participate more actively in society, and to gain access to leisure activities.It also promoted activities to improve the quality and efficacy of secondary schools.The foundation distributed educational grants as well as a wide range of prizes to organizations for competitions run for or by young people.

The King Baudouin Foundation currently works in the following program ar­eas, some of which are targeted at young people, although not exclusively:

  • Migration and Multicultural Society: Promotes integration and a multicul­tural society in Belgium and Europe.
  • Poverty and Social Justice: Seeks to identify new forms of social injustice and poverty; and supports projects that build greater solidarity between the generations.
  • Civil Society and Voluntary Work: Encourages social commitment; pro­motes democratic values among young people; and supports neighborhood and local projects.
  • Health: Promotes a healthy way of life and seeks to help build an accessible and socially acceptable health care system.
  • Philanthropy: Seeks to make philanthropy more efficient in Belgium and Europe.
  • The Balkans: Focuses on protecting the rights of minorities and the victims of human trafficking; and setting up a visa system for students.
  • Central Africa: Supports projects in the field of AIDS prevention and offers guidance to AIDS patients.

 

For more information

www.kbs-frb.be/index.aspx?LangType=1033

www.kbs-frb.be/budget.htm?LangType=1033.

 

 

 MAMA CASH FOUNDATION

The mission of Mama Cash is to mobilize resources from individuals and insti­tutions, make grants to women’s and girls’ groups, and help to build the part­nerships and networks needed to successfully defend and advance women’s and girls’ human rights globally.Since 1983, Mama Cash has granted over €30 million to approximately 6,000 women’s groups around the world.Since 2005, some €10 million in grants were made to groups in 122 countries.Mama Cash supports groups of women and girls to transform disempowering laws and practices and create communities that support safety, equality, and opportu­nity for everyone.It strategically funds women’s and girls’ human rights or­ganizations working for women to have the right to decide concerning their bodies, gain economic justice and independence, and make their voices heard.Grant-Making support is restricted to women’s and girls’ human rights groups and women’s funds worldwide.Mama Cash accepts applications from women’s and girls’ human rights organizations and women’s funds.It has an open ap­plication process and also invites organizations and women’s funds to apply for funding.It provides support for awards and prizes, conferences and seminars,

general support and general purposes, program development, research, staff development, and technical assistance.

For more information visit:

www.efc.be/webready/MCFW001.html.

www.mamacash.org

 

1.2.3.ORGANIZATIONS WITH OPERATIONAL PROGRAMS SUPPORTING YOUTH INITIATIVES

 

THE INTERNATIONAL AWARD ASSOCIATION (IAA)

The IAA is a self-development program available to young people between the ages of 14 and 25.Launched in the UK in 1956 as the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, the program has now spread to 126 countries. Any group working with young people can participate. Young people design their own award program, set their own goals, and record their own progress. Those who work toward

achieving the award discover what they are made of, make an impact on their community, and develop life skills. The award is administered by the Nation­al Award Authorities (NAAs), which are responsible for the operation of the award within a particular country. These awards form the IAA and are gov­erned by its constitution. There are currently 59 NAAs, which are nongovern­mental or governmental bodies. In countries where there is no NAA, the IAA offers individual schools, youth clubs, youth organizations, and other NGOs the opportunity to become independent operators of the award.One focus of the award is to ensure the inclusion of young people from disadvantaged back­grounds in the program.

For more information visit:

www.intaward.org

www.intaward.org/search/?fSearch=annual+report&fSubmit.x=0&fSubmit.y=0&fSubmit=Go.

 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON FOUNDATION

Johnson & Johnson is the world’s most comprehensive and broadly based man­ufacturer of health care products, as well as a provider of related services for the consumer, pharmaceutical, and professional markets.The Johnson & John­son family of companies, consisting of more than 200 companies in 54 coun­tries, sponsors a wide range of initiatives, often in partnership with national foundations.These initiatives can be divided into four core areas: Community Responsibility, Women and Children’s Health, Access to Care, and Advanc­73 1.2 International Foundations and Organizations Providing Financing for Youth and Youth-Related Projects

ing Health Care Knowledge.Two of these core areas include projects targeting young people:

Community Responsibility:

  • School for Leaders Association: offers promising youngsters from Poland and Central Eastern Europe training in leadership skills and supports social and governmental community activities.

Women and Children’s Health:

  • Medusana Stiftung, Germany: develops health care programs, health care education, and consulting services for school children between ages 9 and 14.It also collaborates with physicians associations and health insurance companies to coordinate health education projects and initiatives.
  • Barretstown Gang Camp, Ireland: provides emotionally and physically challenging therapeutic, recreational, and social activities for seriously ill children through its international summer camp program.

For more information:

www.efc.be/webready/JOHN001.html

www.efc.be/webready/JOHN001.html.

 

REWORK THE WORLD

Rework the World is a global initiative that seeks to mobilize young people around promising sustainable ventures and help take the emerging green

economy to the next level.It is a response to the confluence of the ecological and economic crises and to the increasing fragmentation in our societies.The project strives for a positive mobilization and for significant concrete results by combining existing initiatives into real collaborative forces of change.The goal is to help generate two million opportunities for young people to be engaged in meaningful work in sustainability-related enterprises by 2012.

Rework the World is a partnership between YES Inc., a global network of youth-led movements in 55 countries, and the Tällberg Foundation, with a global network of high-level decision makers from business, civil society, academia, and politics.Through local meetings and activities organized in cooperation with local partners around the world, Rework aims to:

  • identify the most promising local environmentally sustainable ventures with a potential for large-scale employment creation;
  • connect these ventures with complementary stakeholders—investors, so­cial entrepreneurs, governments, and youth movements—to take promising ventures into forceful collaborative efforts;
  • inspire business leaders, decision makers, established institutions, and poli­ticians to turn collaborative efforts into transformative forces for change.

Through a methodology grounded in systems thinking and based on strategic brokering of relationships, the project seeks to significantly scale the impact of existing efforts by engineering clusters of supporting actors and linking these to local youth networks.The aim is to generate large-scale green employment opportunities for youth, and to realize synergies in existing efforts of business, civil society, government, and international bodies.

Concrete results have emerged from meetings in East Africa, India, and Latin America.Entrepreneurs in areas such as low-income housing, solar energy lighting for rural areas, sustainable charcoal, and rural livelihoods have, as a result of the project, started to work with youth leaders and networks, prepar­ing plans to support green youth opportunities.

For more information:

www.reworktheworld.org

 

 THE SKOLL FOUNDATION

The Skoll Foundation advances systemic change to benefit communities around the world by investing in, connecting, and celebrating social entrepreneurs.Skoll supports not-for-profit organizations rather than individuals; works with organizations that have a proven track record in the field of empowerment; increases resources and influence through grant-making; seeks long-term im­pact and universal application; and values innovation, creative ideas, and new solutions to problems.The Skoll Foundation does not have a dedicated youth funding program, but its principles lend themselves to funding initiatives ex­ecuted by young social entrepreneurs.

For more information visit: www.skollfoundation.org/aboutskoll/index.asp

  • Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship

The Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship support social entrepre­neurs whose work has the potential for large-scale influence on critical challenges of our time: tolerance and human rights, health, economic and social equity, peace and security, institutional responsibility, and environ­mental sustainability.These issues are at the heart of the foundation’s vi­sion of empowering people to create a peaceful, prosperous, sustainable world.Within these issues, the foundation is particularly interested in ap­plications from social entrepreneurs working in five critical sub-issue areas that threaten the survival of humanity: climate change, nuclear prolifera­tion, pandemics, conflict in the Middle East, and water scarcity.The Skoll Awards provide later-stage, or mezzanine, funding.In most cases, the grant is provided for core support to help organizations expand their programs and capacity to deliver long-term, sustainable equilibrium change.The Skoll Awards are not intended for new or early-stage programs or initia­tives.Programs submitted for consideration should have a track record of no less than three years.

Qualifying organizations will:

  • be led by a social entrepreneur;
  • have implemented innovative programs that demonstrate effective ap­proaches to critical social and environmental challenges with global im­plications.Organizations developing local or regional models for repli­cation on a national or international scale should show that the location where the model is being tested is central to the issue in question.Ex­amples are peace and security initiatives in conflict regions, biodiversity solutions in species-rich “hot spots,” educational opportunities in inner cities, and disease treatments at the source of potential epidemics.
  • be able to describe a clear, long-term path to creating an equilibrium change;
  • demonstrate proof of concept with measurable outcomes;
  • have a clear, compelling plan for reaching scale;
  • demonstrate a track record of at least three years;
  • have a clear plan for long-term financial and operational sustainability;
  • commit to working with peers and the Skoll Foundation to share learn­ing and communicate success strategies.

For more information visit:

www.skollfoundation.org/skollawards/index.asp

 

WORLD ALLIANCE FOR CITIZEN PARTICIPATION (CIVICUS)

 

CIVICUS is an international network that spans civil society. CIVICUS works to strengthen citizen action and civil society worldwide, especially in areas where participatory democracy and citizens’ freedom of association are threat­ened. CIVICUS provides a focal point for knowledge sharing, common inter­est representation, global institution building, and engagement among these disparate sectors.It acts as an advocate for citizen participation as an essential component of governance and democracy worldwide.CIVICUS has estab­lished its global headquarters in Johannesburg, South Africa.It networks with many national and international organizations, including youth organizations, and runs some programs of special interest to young people, including one on volunteerism.

For more information visit: www.civicus.org

  • Special Project on Volunteerism

Recognizing the importance of volunteerism for citizen participation, CI­VICUS renewed a 2004 Memorandum of Understanding with the Inter­national Association for Volunteer Effort (IAVE) and the UN Volunteer (UNV) program to jointly promote a greater awareness of the value of vol­unteers and volunteer action to society, particularly for advancing wide­ly held development goals, such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).CIVICUS is currently renewing its partnership with IAVE and UNV, and jointly identifying activities that lead to the International Year of the Volunteer + 10 (2011).As part of this process, CIVICUS will be ex­ploring options for integrating its volunteerism work into new and existing programs and operations, including the development of a volunteer pro­gram and management scheme.

 

For more information visit:

www.civicus.org/special-projects

 

1.3 GOVERNMENTAL AND NONGOVERNMENTAL DEVELOPMENT AID AGENCIES

 

1.3.1 GOVERNMENTAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID AGENCIES

In the area of international development cooperation and provision of aid, government agencies of the world’s most developed countries are central play­ers, as direct implementers of assistance projects and as sources of funding for bilateral, multilateral, and nongovernmental programs.As an illustration, the combined aid of the 23 members of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee was US$119.8 billion, by far the largest assistance offered in the development field.6

Programming of governmental aid and development agencies is typically guid­ed by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), a set of eight specific goals to be met by 2015 that aim to combat extreme poverty across the world.The eight MDGs are:

  • eradicate extreme poverty and hunger;
  • achieve universal primary education;
  • promote gender equality and empower women;
  • reduce child mortality;
  • improve maternal health;
  • combat HIV and AIDS, malaria, and other diseases;
  • ensure environmental sustainability;
  • develop a global partnership for development.

6 The OECD Development Assistance Committee comprises Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Den­mark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Commis­sion of the European Communities.A list of their respective aid agencies is provided at the end of this section.

Most government aid agencies structure their programming according to some or all of these goals, often with specific geographic regions of the world.Ac­cordingly, programming is typically oriented towards specific problems rather than age groups, such as children and youth, who are central only to some of the goals, such as education and child mortality.In most other thematic areas, children and youth are subsumed with society more broadly.

While none of the leading governmental development agencies has a specif­ic youth programs, some of them place a stronger emphasis on children and young people than others.This concern typically takes the form of individual projects within broader program areas and in relation to specific MDGs.Some programs are detailed below.

AUSTRALIAN AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (AUSAID)

AusAID is the government agency responsible for managing Australia’s over­seas aid program.The objective of the aid program, whose budget is AUD$3.8 billion in 2009–10, is to help developing countries reduce poverty and achieve sustainable development.Australia’s aid program focuses on the Asia Pacific region, but also provides selective assistance to Africa and the Middle East.

Education: AusAID has two priorities in the area of education.First, its pro­grams improve the functioning of national education systems to enable more girls and boys to complete primary school and progress to higher levels of edu­cation.Second, its programs enhance the relevance and quality of education, including vocational and technical education, so students acquire the knowl­edge and skills necessary for life and productive employment.The aim is, by 2010, to help developing countries increase the number of children attending school by ten million and to improve the quality of education for an additional 50 million children.One of the flagship projects of AusAID is the Australia-Pacific Technical Col­lege, which focuses on increasing the number of skilled Pacific island gradu­ates and enhancing the quality of their training to meet Australian standards of vocational and technical education.If this is done well, in the right sectors, Pacific island economies will benefit from a larger, better skilled workforce to support economic growth, and graduates will benefit from improved employ­ment opportunities at home and in an increasingly international labor market

Health: Children and young people are, along with women, the primary focus groups of AusAID’s programming on primary health care and disease preven­tion.In the Asia-Pacific region, women’s and children’s health, domestic vio­lence, HIV/AIDS, and malaria are serious challenges, compounded by insuffi­cient public health systems, national health policy development and planning, disease surveillance systems, and health education.AusAID support is pro­vided to address public health deficits directly and build more effective public health structures.

An example of the strong focus on children and young people that character­izes many of AusAID’s health programming is the Wan Smolbag Theater.From a small group of voluntary actors in 1989, the theater is now one of the Pacific’s premier drama companies and produces plays about social and environmental issues important to Vanuatu.With nearly half the country’s population under the age of 29, young people dominate the audience, and Wan Smolbag Theater provides them with lively and entertaining educational material.Performed by people more or less the same age as the audience, the plays contain strong social messages that stimulate helpful discussions and encourage healthier at­titudes .

Human Rights: One of the pillars of AusAID’s assistance is the Human Rights Small Grants Scheme, established in 1997 to fund projects that build the capac­ity of developing countries to promote and protect human rights.Projects fo­cus on educating and raising awareness in the area of human rights, promoting democratic principles, educating and training human rights workers, promot­

ing international human rights standards, improving reporting to UN treaty bodies and the Universal Periodic Review, and promoting and strengthening national or regional human rights institutions or policies.Funded projects di­rectly benefit marginalized groups (such as people with disabilities, women, children, and youth, people living with HIV/AIDS, prisoners, homeless peo­ple, refugees and internally displaced people, indigenous peoples, ethnic mi­norities, and others), and promote equal opportunities for women and men.Grants range from AUD$20,000 to 100,000 over one year, and can benefit proj­ects in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and the Pacific.

Research: AusAID funds practical, policy-relevant social science research into development challenges through its Australian Development Research Awards.Annual calls for proposals invite research projects from Australian and inter­national research organizations and institutions within specific priority areas.In 2009, these areas include disability-inclusive development, economics, gen­der, and performance-linked aid.Proposals for projects that last up to three years are accepted and eligible to receive funding between AUD$100,000 and $300,000 per year.Although not specifically focused on youth research, proj­ects with a focus on children and young people are eligible.

For more information:

www.aptc.edu.au.

www.ausaid.gov.au

www.ausaid.gov.au/research/pdf/adra_final_successful_recipients.pdf.

www.wansmolbag.org

www.ausaid.gov.au/business/pdf/HRSGS%20Successful%20projects%20for%202008.pdf.

 

BELGIAN TECHNICAL COOPERATION (BTC)

The BTC is the Belgian agency for development cooperation.On behalf of the Belgian government, BTC supports developing countries in their fight against poverty.Apart from this public service, BTC also executes contracts on behalf of other national and international organizations that work toward sustainable  

human development.BTC manages more than 200 projects in more than 20 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Education: In cooperation with local partners, BTC is carrying out dozens of projects in the educational field.One of the main concerns is to ensure more access to improved, longer-lasting education and to ensure equal access for girls and boys and for women and men.Above all, the emphasis is on basic educa­tion, technical and vocational education, and the training and supplementary training for teachers and trainers in both non-formal and formal education.

For example, in the Oubritenga-Kourweogo-Kadiogo area (Burkina Faso), BTC is carrying out a program intended to enhance the skills of the local pop­ulation by increasing access to primary school, improving the quality of basic education, ensuring functional literacy for adults (especially women), and pro­viding training for young people not attending school.

Children’s Rights: In 2005, Belgium amended its law on international coop­eration to include children’s rights as a sector-transcending and high-priority focus for Belgian development cooperation.Children’s rights are thus incor­porated into the law as a central point of interest along with gender, social economy, and the environment.This amendment was seen as a logical conse­quence of the Millennium Development Goals, which form the framework for the Belgian development cooperation, since six of the eight objectives relate directly to children and respect for their rights.

For more information:

www.btcctb.org

 

CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (CIDA)

CIDA is Canada’s lead agency for development assistance.It has a mandate to support sustainable development in developing countries in order to reduce poverty and to contribute to a more secure, equitable, and prosperous world.It carries out its mandate through multilateral, geographic, bilateral, and part­

nership programs.In 2006 and 2007, CIDA’s budget totaled some CAN$2.5 billion.

Children’s Rights: CIDA’s strategy for child protection aims to increase the realization of the rights of children, particularly those in need of special pro­tection, through capacity building for government and civil society, targeted social services, and meaningful child participation.

The Child Protection Research Fund was a CAN$2 million grant fund estab­lished in 2001 by CIDA to support research on child protection issues in the developing world.The fund’s main goals were to influence child protection policy—both within CIDA and internationally—and to identify sustainable, practical solutions to the problems facing children in need of special protec­tion from abuse, exploitation, and violence.The fund supported 13 research projects that focused on children in wars and conflicts, the impact of HIV/AIDS, aggressive behavior, substance abuse, juvenile detention, children in in­stitutional care, and child labor.For more detail on projects supported by this fund,.

Advocacy and Raising Awareness: CIDA maintains a number of Canadian partnership programs that support activities to raise awareness of the country’s citizens of the need to get involved in development issues, and urge them to support organizations in Canada’s voluntary and private sectors that partner with organizations in developing countries.Several of the partnership pro­grams have an explicit focus on young people.

The Global Classroom Initiative supports the development of school-based global education resources and activities.The initiative supports projects from the education sector that will help Canadian youth get to know their global neighbors, appreciate different worldviews, and understand the global impact of their choices and actions.The initiative’s focus helps children make respon­sible choices for the sake of the collective future.

The Public Engagement Fund (PEF) financially supports projects that seek to increase the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians in

international development issues and programs; increase support for Canada’s international assistance program and for international efforts to reduce global poverty; and create opportunities for meaningful participation in international development activities.Preference is given to projects that target or focus on the active engagement of young people in international development.The PEF accepts proposals for projects that take place in Canada and target specific Ca­nadian audiences.CIDA contributes up to 75% of the project costs, with a minimum of CAN$25,000 and a maximum of $175,000.

For more information:

www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/CIDAWEB/acdicida.nsf/En/JUD-91713231-MZ5

 http://les.acdi-cida.gc.ca/project-browser.

www.crin.org/resources/infoDetail.asp?ID=11598&flag=report.

www.acdi-cida.gc.ca

 

GERMAN SOCIETY FOR TECHNICAL COOPERATION [DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FÜR TECHNISCHE ZUSAMMENARBEIT] (GTZ)

The GTZ is one of the lead agencies for development cooperation in Germa­ny.Active in 87 countries worldwide, it focuses on Africa, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Europe and Central Asia.Its nearly 2,700 projects are primarily funded by the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development of Germany, which provided US$1.4 billion of GTZ’s 2008 budget of US$1.9 billion.

GTZ programs focus on rural development, the economy and employment, the environment and infrastructure, good governance, social development, and crosscutting issues.Since 1997, GTZ has also developed programs that focus on children and young people in the areas of youth employment, child and youth health, risk behavior in children and adolescents, general and peace education, and crisis prevention.The objective has been to empower children

and adolescents to assert their rights and play an active role in changing their situation.Programs about children and young people have three main themes:

Protection: Children’s rights are enshrined in international law.GTZ provides support to partner with governments on the implementation of these rights, with a particular focus on the rights of girls.For example, since 2002, GTZ has been advising the government of Côte d’Ivoire on measures to combat child trafficking and the worst forms of child labor, combined with employment pro­motion measures that offer girls prospects for the future.

Prevention: Young people are disproportionately affected by social inequal­ity and exclusion and therefore prone to become involved in crime, either as victims or as perpetrators.In order to tackle this challenge to societies’ peace and development, GTZ utilizes a range of approaches in the areas of youth and peace work and adolescent reproductive health care.In El Salvador, with the help of a systemic planning tool on the Prevention of Youth Violence, a com­ponent for peaceful coexistence was developed and is currently being imple­mented.

Participation: According to international conventions, young people are en­titled to social and political participation.In many countries, however, these particular rights still play a subordinate role.GTZ offers its experience with youth social work and helps partner countries to implement local and nation­al youth policies.One example of this approach to help realize children’s and youth rights is in West Africa, with the aid of a tool kit titled “Get Youth on Board!” Stakeholders from Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia developed strate­gies to promote regional collaboration on participatory youth work.

For more information visit:

www.gtz.de/en/themen/uebergreifende-themen/jugend/27139.htm.

www.gtz.de/en/index.htm

 

IRISH AID

Irish Aid is the government of Ireland’s program of assistance to developing countries.Since its establishment in 1974, it has grown steadily to its current budget of US$1.420 billion in 2008.Irish Aid’s core mandate is poverty reduc­tion, and in its programming, it has identified four priority issues integral to achieving this mandate: gender equality, HIV/AIDS, environmental sustain­ability, and good governance.The most important characteristic of Irish Aid programming, however, is its strong focus on development education.

Education and Research: A dedicated Development Education Unit was es­tablished in 2003 and charged with implementing a long-term strategy for de­velopment education.Programming is based on the assumption that people in Ireland have an important role to play as citizens at the local and international levels.Young people, in particular, need to develop a good knowledge and un­derstanding of development issues and the underlying causes of poverty and underdevelopment in the world.

Irish Aid has since pursued development education programming in a variety of ways.It organized a number of competitions among young people, includ­ing the Development Youth Prize 2007, the Irish Aid/Self Help “Science for Development” award, and several rounds of development education grants.In parallel, a comprehensive research program was launched in 2000 that has resulted in several commissioned research papers and projects funded by Irish Aid.

For more information visit:

www.irishaid.gov.ie

www.irishaid.gov.ie/article.asp?article=1167.

www.irishaid.gov.ie/article.asp?article=1127

NETHERLANDS MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Development cooperation is one of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ principal tasks.The Netherlands contributes US$6.3 billion per year toward the de­

velopment of poor countries around the world.Assistance is provided to 36 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe.Its aid focuses on human rights and a business climate conducive to jobs and good incomes, education, water and sanitation, the environment and reproductive health, and the fight against HIV/AIDS.

  • Matra Social Transformation Program

The Matra Social Transformation Program contributes to promoting se­curity, cooperation, and democracy in Central and Eastern Europe and selected countries bordering the European Union (EU).Since 1994, the Dutch government has used Matra to encourage social regeneration in countries throughout the region.The program’s aim is to support the trans­formation to a democratic society governed by the rule of law.It therefore supports activities that promote reform of the state and its institutions, civil society organizations, and the connections between them.

Matra currently operates in two new EU member states (Bulgaria and Ro­mania), three candidate countries for EU accession (Croatia, Macedonia, Turkey), five potential EU candidate countries (Albania, Bosnia-Herze­govina, Kosovo, Montenegro, Serbia), six of the EU’s Eastern neighbors to the east (Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, the Russian Federation, Ukraine), and six Mediterranean countries (Algeria, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia).The 12 qualifying themes of the Matra program are legislation and law, public administration/public order/police, human rights/minorities, environment, biodiversity, housing, information and the media, culture, welfare, health care, labor and social policy, and education.Within these themes, opportunities exist under Matra to address children and youth-related issues.For 2009, a budget of €18 million was available for the Matra Projects Program (MPP) and was divided over two grant rounds, in March and in Sept.

 

For more information:

www.minbuza.nl/en/home

NEW ZEALAND’S INTERNATIONAL AID AND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (NZAID)

NZAID is the agency within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade that manages New Zealand’s official development assistance (ODA) program and provides policy advice on international development issues.Its mission is to support sustainable development in developing countries in order to reduce poverty and to contribute to a more secure, equitable, and prosperous world.NZAID has undergone rapid growth since its establishment in 2002.In the 2006–7 fiscal year, NZAID managed 1,200 international development con­tracts and administered a total budget of NZD 430 million.Its primary geo­graphic focus is the Pacific and Southeast Asia region.

Education: While most of New Zealand’s education aid has gone into higher education in the form of scholarships, since 2000 the focus has shifted toward increased support for the provision of basic education in order to achieve the internationally agreed Education For All goals by 2015.NZAID recognizes that a quality basic education, from early childhood through secondary education, is a fundamental human right and a critical tool to reduce poverty.NZAID will maintain education’s share of total development assistance at approximately one-third and, within this share, work toward increasing the funding for basic education to 50% of the total education budget.

One program in which NZAID is a lead donor is Education For All in the Solomon Islands.Since 2003, this program has worked to strengthen manage­ment of the formal education system, developed a program to upgrade school infrastructure, revised the curriculum and distributed textbooks and teaching aids to primary schools, and supported Waikato University to train sufficient numbers of teachers.The program has since resulted in the introduction fee-free basic education, allowing more children to attend school and gain the edu­cation they need.

Research: NZAID engages with development-related research in a variety of ways.Through its International Development Research Fund, New Zealand

based researchers (academics, nongovernmental organizations researchers, and the staff of research organizations) work in partnership with researchers from developing countries.Research supported by the fund focuses on advanc­ing developing policy and practice in the regions.Postgraduate field research awards offer students from New Zealand universities the opportunity to work in developing countries.Several networks are supported by NZAID to connect academics, students, and development practitioners, such as DevNet, and poli­cymaking and research institutes, such as the Oceania Development Network.While research is not exclusively youth-focused, possibilities for projects on children and youth-related issues exist through these channels.

For more information:

www.nzaid.govt.nz/what-we-do/research-at-nzaid.html.

www.nzaid.govt.nz

 

NORWEGIAN AGENCY FOR DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION (NORAD)

Norad is a directorate under the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA).The objective of Norway’s development policy is to fight poverty and bring about social justice.With a total budget of US$5.2 billion, assistance focuses on several priority areas where Norway feels it can make the greatest contribution: the environment and sustainable development; peace building, human rights, and humanitarian assistance; oil and clean energy; women and gender equal­ity; good governance and the fight against corruption; and efforts to reach the health-related Millennium Development Goals.

Norway has also focused on the rights and life-chances of children and young people.Significant support goes toward public welfare services, particularly in the health and education sectors, and Norway pays particular attention to the education of young girls and of children in war and conflict areas, their involvement in peace and reconciliation efforts, the protection of their rights in armed conflicts and humanitarian disasters, and the right of children and young people to participate and have their say.

Somewhat outside its general programming, Norway also renders substan­tial assistance under the Norway Grants within the European Economic Area (EEA) financial instrument.This regional grant-making initiative for newer EU member countries was established in conjunction with the EU Eastward enlargement 2004, which also expanded the EEA, of which Iceland, Liech­tenstein, and Norway are a part along with the EU.Between 2004 and 2009, US$950 million was disbursed in EEA grants, with Norway contributing 97% of the funding.Beneficiary countries are the 12 states that have joined the EU since 2004, as well as Greece, Spain, and Portugal.Among the priority areas of this program, several are relevant to children and young people, including health and childcare, education and human resources, and good governance and participation.A directory of projects supported by Norway and EEA grants.

For more information:

www.eeagrants.org/id/13.

http://norad.no/en

 

SWEDISH INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY (SIDA)

Sida is an authority under the jurisdiction of the Swedish Ministry for For­eign Affairs.Out of Sweden’s total 2009 budget for development assistance of US$4.7 billion, Sida administered $2.3 billion.The Swedish government re­cently assessed and overhauled its approach to development assistance, with adjustments resulting in a stronger focus on Africa, on former Soviet states, and Southeast Europe, on peace and security, and on democracy and human rights.Under the new programming, bilateral development cooperation is car­ried out with just over 30 partner countries, and concentrates on democracy and human rights, gender equality and the role of women in development, and climate and environment.

One aspect of Sida operations is its strong reliance on Swedish and internation­al organizations, associations, agencies, companies, and cooperatives to imple­ment large-scale programs.For example, a total of 16 Swedish organizations 91 1.3 Governmental and Nongovernmental Development Aid Agencies

currently have framework agreements with Sida, implement joint projects and contribute 10% of the project costs.Joint ventures also exist with numerous NGOs focusing on democratic reform and civil society development and par­ticipation.

One such project is the European Humanities University (EHU), a Belarusian university in exile based in Vilnius, Lithuania.Founded in Minsk in 1992 and closed by state authorities in 2004, it re-launched activities in Vilnius in 2005.Currently, EHU is the only Belarusian university committed to academic free­dom and the process of integrating a European higher education on BA and MA levels, and offering quality liberal education and research.With a contri­bution of US$850,000 for 2008–10, Sida is one of EHU’s largest funders.

For more information:

www.sida.se

 

SWISS AGENCY FOR DEVELOPMENT AND COOPERATION (SDC)

The SDC is Switzerland’s international cooperation agency within the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs.It is responsible for the coordination of de­velopment activities and cooperation with Eastern Europe, as well as for the humanitarian aid delivered by the Swiss Confederation.SDC has an annual budget of US$1.3 billion (2008), which is allocated to direct SDC programs, support programs of multilateral organizations, and help to finance programs run by Swiss and international aid organizations in three main areas.

First, development cooperation aims to alleviate poverty by helping people in partner countries help themselves.Activities focus on promoting economic and government autonomy, improving production conditions, helping to solve environmental problems, and providing better access to education and basic health care for the most disadvantaged population groups.Six programs ben­efit 12 countries in the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Latin America.Second, humanitarian aid is provided in the wake of natural disasters and in the context of armed conflicts with, in 2008, 297 missions of the Swiss Humanitarian Aid

Unit.Third, Swiss cooperation with Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States supports democratic and market economy reforms.The main priorities are the building of democratic institutions, the reform of health and social services, and the improvement of the environment.

Education: SDC work is based on the concept of vocational skills develop­ment.Its activities are aimed at the poorest and most vulnerable sections of the population, with emphasis on young people and women as well as rural populations.By coordinating and integrating its activities with other educa­tion-related activities in a country, SDC endeavors to establish an efficient, flexible educational system that addresses local requirements and understands and supports the need for lifelong learning.

Minorities: SDC is a principal sponsor of the 2005–15 Roma Decade and, in particular, the Roma Education Fund.Active in nine countries in Central and Southeast Europe, the fund aims to raise primary school attendance among Roma children and higher education among Roma youth.It does so through five major programs that disburse grants to Roma education initiatives, fund studies, technical assistance, strategy development, and learning activities, bol­ster knowledge on education reforms and Roma inclusion, and provide schol­arships for Roma university students.The fund’s budget is projected at US$48 million.

Governance: SDC funds projects that strengthen civil society, the media, and human rights, and supports elections and wider parliamentary powers.It de­velops room for grassroots consultation and political dialogue to encourage the emergence of a democratic culture rooted in rural areas and at the mu­nicipal level.The SDC is therefore particularly active in championing the de­centralization processes that reinforce the autonomy and legitimacy of local authorities—a legitimacy based on mechanisms for consultation and dialogue between elected representatives and their fellow citizens.An example are com­munity forums in Southeast Europe, where SDC has initiated and support­ed several hundred projects to promote a culture of democratic dialogue at community level in Bulgaria and Macedonia.In so doing, SDC hopes to help 93 1.3 Governmental and Nongovernmental Development Aid Agencies

citizens play an active role in shaping the development of their communities through grassroots community forums and participation

for more information:

www.sdc.admin.ch/en/Home/Projects.

www.sdc.admin.ch

 

UNITED KINGDOM DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)

The DFID was established in 1997 as a part of the UK government to manage Britain’s aid to poor countries and overcome extreme poverty.DFID works in 150 countries and had, in 2007–8, a budget of US$8.7 billion.Well over half the aid goes to developing countries either directly or through an international body.Almost a third of the UK’s aid goes to international bodies for their own development activities, such as health care, education, and economic growth.DFID also works with over 200 international and UK civil society organiza­tions and has direct or indirect links with thousands of civil society organiza­tions in developing countries.Funding to civil society has increased by 84% since 1997.

Social Exclusion: DFID works with partners to address the needs and rights of specific excluded groups, particularly disabled people, children, and youth.Projects aim to give disadvantaged and marginalized people a voice in decision making.Research is supported to learn about the economic impact of social exclusion, its role in the relationship between growth, employment, and pover­ty, and disability.In Serbia, DFID has supported a government initiative to give some of the country’s most disadvantaged people the chance of a better future.The UK-backed package of social welfare reforms includes a series of programs aimed at young adults without parents.In Bolivia, DFID support helped to establish Circo Infantil, an educational facility for children from poor families and indigenous groups to learn social and vocational skills.

Health Education: DFID’s priority to improve health education and services provides young people with better sexual and reproductive health informa­tion, services, and supplies.In Rwanda, DFID works with the government to support youth education programs on HIV/AIDS.Across the country, youth centers offer young people a combination of leisure time activities and health education.DFID’s investment in the Rwandan health education program is an annual US$2.5 million.

Gender Equality: DFID is making gender equality a priority and focuses on ev­erything from girls’ education to microfinance, HIV and AIDS to conflict reso­lution, and maternal health to boosting the political participation of women.For example, DFID is contributing significantly to the European Commission’s Northern Pakistan Education Program that provides aid to disadvantaged chil­dren and adults, particularly women.The organization established 368 literacy centers and advanced the literacy of tens of thousands of women.As a result, mothers were better able to assist their children with homework and became more actively involved in their children’s school.An additional benefit of the literacy centers included instruction in fields such as human rights.

For more information:

www.youth-policy.com//index.cfm?page=basicSearch

www.dfid.gov.uk

 

UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (USAID)

USAID is an independent federal government agency that receives foreign pol­icy guidance from the Secretary of State.Its history goes back to the Marshall Plan reconstruction of Europe after World War II and the Truman Adminis­tration’s Point Four Program.In 1961, the Foreign Assistance Act was signed into law and USAID was created by executive order.Since that time, USAID has been the principal U.S.agency to extend assistance to countries recovering from disaster, trying to escape poverty, and engaging in democratic reforms.The agency works in 100 developing countries and in close partnership with private voluntary organizations, indigenous groups, universities, American

businesses, international organizations, other governments, trade and pro­fessional associations, faith-based organizations, and other U.S.government agencies.USAID projected budget for 2010 is US$53.9 billion.The following are USAID’s major programs for youth.

Youth Development: Within its priority on education, USAID has specific programming on youth development.It supports youth programs that address a diverse spectrum of youth needs and draws on technical expertise in educa­tion, health, democracy and governance, natural resource management, eco­nomic development, and agriculture.Specific activity areas include:

Literacy for Out-of-School Youth: USAID’s Basic Education and EQUIP 3 programs provide training in literacy, math, and other basic skills for out-of-school youth through initiatives such as Liberia’s Accelerated Learning Program.

Youth & HIV/AIDS: Almost half of all new HIV infections in developing countries are among 15 to 24 year-olds.USAID is using media campaigns, peer counseling, life skills training, and interventions for youth in particularly vulnerable circumstances.These kinds of activities are designed to reach young people with prevention messages and help them develop the skills necessary to protect themselves.

Youth & Civic Participation: Enhancing youth civic participation is key to creating an environment supportive of civil society, especially in countries with fragile democratic traditions.

Youth & Microenterprise: USAID’s Microenterprise Development Office col­laborates with field practitioners and programs to develop, implement, and as­sess the impact of market-oriented strategies that advance the economic situa­tion of youth.The Youth Livelihoods program within the MicroLinks activity is an example of such programs.

Youth & Post-Conflict Stability: USAID’s Conflict Management and Mitiga­tion Office is helping USAID to engage young people often left behind by more traditional development programs.Programs such as USAID/Middle East’s  

Developing Leaders Program reintegrate former child soldiers, create oppor­tunities for youth to participate in community and political arenas, and pro­vide job training.

Youth & Workforce Development: USAID’s Workforce Development pro­grams focus on developing youth employability skills, such as critical thinking and facility with computer technology, as well as specific technical and voca­tional skills, in response to industry workforce demands through programs like USAID/East Timor’s JOB Opportunities Project.

Youth Livelihoods: Livelihood development programming, such as USAID/Haiti’s IDEJEN project, aims to enhance the readiness of young people to en­gage in livelihoods activities, such as employment, household-based activities, self-employment micro-enterprise activities.

Youth Policy: USAID is one of the few development agencies that have made youth policy an explicit part of their programming, within USAID’s broad­er health policy initiative.It supports youth-policy.com, an online resource for improving youth reproductive health and HIV/AIDS policy worldwide.Among others, this resource base includes a searchable database containing 131 full-text policies addressing youth reproductive health from 49 countries.

For more information:

www.youth-policy.com.

www.usaid.gov/our_work/education_and_universities/youth_dev/.

 

1.3.2 NONGOVERNMENTAL AID AGENCIES

CARE INTERNATIONAL

CARE is one of the world’s largest private international humanitarian orga­nizations, committed to helping families in poor communities improve their lives and achieve lasting victories over poverty.Founded in 1945 to provide relief to survivors of World War II, CARE is devoted to fighting global poverty.CARE runs some 1,200 projects each year in over 65 countries, reaching more than 50 million people in poor communities worldwide.It does so with a par­ticular focus on girls and women, and through a variety of thematic programs, campaigns, and direct interventions, of which several address the situation and prospects of children and young people.

Cross-Cutting Initiatives: CARE’s cross-cutting initiatives span all program sectors to tackle the underlying causes of poverty, and place special emphasis on working with women and girls to create lasting social change.For example, the Sport for Social Change Initiative uses the convening power of sports as a vehicle to minimize the effects of poverty on youth while working to advance gender equality, develop life skills, promote health education, provide psycho­social support, and create income-generating activities.

Education: CARE is dedicated to securing basic education for all.Experience shows that learning attacks poverty at its roots.Educated people can make thoughtful and informed decisions that will positively affect their lives, their families, their communities, and their world.Mothers are more likely to have healthier children and higher incomes.CARE works alongside communities, governments, and partner organizations at many levels to address all aspects of basic education.Its inclusive approaches include training teachers and other school personnel to improve the quality of education; linking education pro­grams to interventions in health, nutrition, and livelihoods to better address reasons why children are out of school; involving communities in assessing and overcoming their unique barriers to learning; and conducting broad cam­paigns that promote the right to education for all people.

Health: A family cannot be economically healthy if it is not physically healthy.CARE’s health projects focus on mothers and children, who often are the most vulnerable to disease and malnutrition.It is particularly interested in increas­ing the capacity of local partners to deliver quality health services.This interest includes training local health volunteers as counselors, mentors, and monitors of community health.CARE is focused on interventions ranging from nutri­tion and education to birth spacing and clinical services.Its reproductive health projects encompass family planning, prenatal care, labor and delivery services, and the prevention, detection, and treatment of STDs, including HIV/AIDS.

Nutrition: CARE places a special focus on infant and young child feeding and related maternal nutrition practices and care.Proper nutrition is vital to a child’s healthy development and an adult’s ability to work and care for her fam­ily.CARE protects, promotes, and supports optimal growth and development for children under the age of five to ensure their best chance for survival.Proj­ects focus on teaching techniques and practices that help prevent malnutrition, including proper breastfeeding techniques, educating families and communi­ties about how to cultivate and prepare nutritious complementary food, and strengthening local health systems.

Of CARE International’s 12 member organizations, some of the larger ones op­erated with 2008 budgets as follows: Australia 2007–8: US$67.8 million; Cana­da 2008: US$138.3 million; Germany 2008: US$24.0 million; United Kingdom: US$73.0 million; and United States: US$673.6 million.

For more information visit:

www.care.org

 

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies is the world’s largest humanitarian organization, providing assistance without dis­crimination as to nationality, race, religious beliefs, class, or political opinions.Founded in 1919, the International Federation comprises 186 member Red Cross and Red Crescent societies, a secretariat in Geneva, and more than 60 delegations strategically located to support activities around the world.The Red Crescent is used in place of the Red Cross in many Islamic countries.

Red Cross and Red Crescent youth comprise more than half of the active vol­unteers.They are active at the local, national, regional, and international lev­els.In an effort to give this significant youth component a stronger voice and involvement in the Federation, several structures, policies, and programs have been put in place.

International Federation Youth Commission: The Youth Commission is an advisory body to the Federation governance that works to ensure that youth-related issues are considered.It promotes the implementation of the Interna­tional Federation Youth Policy and seeks youth opinions worldwide to ensure that these latter are considered at the governance level of the movement.

International Federation Youth Policy: This policy helps both national so­cieties and the Federation to plan for the development of Red Cross and Red Crescent youth, to use the motivation and idealism, experience, and skill of the young people for the benefit of the movement.This policy describes the role of

each of the partners involved in the Red Cross and Red Crescent movement in ensuring that this important group of people is recognized and supported.The partners involved in the youth policy are young people themselves, youth lead­ers and representatives, national societies, the International Federation, the In­ternational Federation Youth Commission, and the International Federation Youth Department.

Youth networks: In some of the regions, youth networks have been established to encourage cooperation between youth members in different regions.A Red Cross Red Crescent youth network is an interconnected support system for youth who interact, meet, and remain in communication for mutual assistance.

For more information visit:

www.ifrc.org/youth

 

INTERNATIONAL SAVE THE CHILDREN ALLIANCE

Save the Children was established in 1919 with the mission of advancing chil­dren’s rights and delivering immediate and lasting improvements to children’s lives worldwide.It is the world’s largest independent organization for children, with programming in over 120 countries.The International Save the Children Alliance is made up of 29 national organizations with a global staff of more than 14,000 working together.

Save the Children carries out comprehensive programming on numerous as­pects of children’s rights and welfare.It conducts campaigns to advance chil­dren’s concerns; works on child protection, education, and health; and ad­dresses emergencies and the global food crisis.Within these areas, Save the Children works on thousands of different initiatives in all world regions, with individual projects geared toward children’s needs and local circumstances.Several key principles underpin the work of the alliance:

Long-Term Approach: Save the Children looks for sustainable solutions that will benefit children and their communities for years to come.It supports and strengthens schools, health care systems, and other infrastructures in the long

term by giving people appropriate skills and resources, such as specialist train­ing and quality equipment.As an example, in Darfur/Sudan, Save the Children works with other humanitarian organizations to support 500,000 children and women displaced by conflict through food aid, health care, and education.In addition to providing immediate relief, this support makes valuable long-term improvements to the lives of today’s young people, and their children in the future.

Advocacy for Children: Save the Children works with, and on behalf of, chil­dren to make sure their rights are respected internationally, nationally and locally.It helps children to communicate their needs to community leaders, parents, teachers, and government officials, and persuades adults to take chil­dren seriously.Efforts are made to convince those with power and influence to create a better world for children.For example, Save the Children contributed to a groundbreaking UN study on violence against children aimed to increase awareness and propose steps to eradicate the problem.Through Save the Chil­dren, young people from 19 countries joined the launch debate at the UN, and a day of action took place in 60 countries to raise awareness of the violence faced by children around the world.

Involving Children: Save the Children, across its programs, encourages chil­dren and their families to participate in research, planning, and decision mak­ing.These contributions are invaluable in ensuring that Save the Children activities meet children’s needs and involves them as active members of soci­ety.As an example, Save the Children’s Youth Outreach Project in Papua New Guinea trains groups of 15 to 25 year-olds in HIV/AIDS peer education.Once trained, these young people propose community-based activities to inform and educate their peers about HIV risks and practical prevention.

Independence and Collaboration: Save the Children is an independent orga­nization with no religious or political affiliations.It works with governments and with local, national, and international organizations to improve children’s lives directly and to influence the policies and practices of others.An impor­tant aspect is the building of capacity of local organizations.

In 2008, Save the Children mobilized US$1.3 billion through its 24 member organizations and three associated entities.The largest portion of this global budget went toward programming on children in emergencies (41%), health (23%), education (19%), and child protection (11%).Among recipient regions, Africa (41%) and Asia (38%) were most prominent.

For more information:

www.savethechildren.net

 

TERRE DES HOMMES

The Terre des Hommes movement was founded in 1960 in Lausanne, Switzer­land.Other Terre des Hommes groups were subsequently created in various countries.In 1966 they joined together to form the Terre des Hommes Inter­national Federation (TDHIF).Terre des Hommes was created to provide direct support to underprivileged children who were not being helped by existing relief agencies.Today its mandate and activities have evolved, while its focus on improving the daily lives of the most vulnerable groups of children has been maintained.

Terre des Hommes organizations develop and implement projects designed to improve the living conditions of disadvantaged children in their own environ­ment (including families and communities).The Convention on the Rights of the Child constitutes the conceptual framework guiding the activities of the Terre des Hommes organizations.In their own countries and regions, the Terre des Hommes organizations bring to the attention of the public, includ­ing children and young people, the causes of underdevelopment, together with the rights of the child.They mobilize political will and advocate appropriate governmental policies.They undertake fundraising activities to achieve their objectives.

Terre des Hommes’ 11 member organizations are involved in 1,084 develop­ment and humanitarian aid projects in 70 countries, and cooperate with 850 local and national NGO partners.The global budget of was US$141 million in

2007, with more than 70% coming from private funding.Terre des Hommes focuses on a number of thematic core areas, including child labor, sexual ex­ploitation, child protection, violence, and emergencies.

For more information;

www.terredeshommes.org

 

WORLD VISION

World Vision is a Christian humanitarian charity organization dedicated to working with children, families, and their communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice.It works with close to 100 million people in nearly 100 countries around the world, serving people regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, or gender.

In its international work, World Vision has the following main program areas with direct relevance for children and young people:

  • Disasters and humanitarian response
  • Children in crisis;
  • Child sponsorship;
  • Health and hygiene;
  • Food and agriculture; and
  • Education and literacy.

International programs are run in Africa, Asia and Pacific, Europe and the Middle East, and Central and South America. In addition, World Vision has programming in the U.S., some of which have a specific focus on young people.In 2007, World Vision had an operating budget of US$976.8 million.

For more information:

www.worldvision.org

 

1.4 INFORMATION SOURCES FOR FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AND THE YOUTH SECTOR

ANNA LINDH FOUNDATION, FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES DATABASE

The Anna Lindh Foundation offers its partners and the general public easy access to various funding opportunities in the field of intercultural work in the Euro-med region through an online search engine covering international, private and non-private organizations; national agencies for development and cooperation; and EU institutions.

 

For more information:

www.euromedalex.org/funding/search

 

CHARITYVILLAGE

Charity Village® is Canada’s online “one stop shop” for the nonprofit sector.It includes more than 3,500 pages of news, jobs, how-to articles, volunteer and event listings, educational opportunities, and information about resources available to the nonprofit sector in Canada and worldwide.

 

For more information:

www.charityvillage.com/cv/main.asp

 

COMMUNITY OF SCIENCE, INC. (COS) FUNDING SEARCH ENGINE

COS is an online funding search engine that provides scientists and research­ers at more than 1,300 universities, corporations, and government agencies 105 1.4 Information Sources for Funding Opportunities for Young People and the Youth Sector

worldwide to communicate, exchange information, find the people and tech­nologies, and to access information about funding opportunities for scientific work.The COS interface allows the user to search for grants from a variety of national and international resources.

 

For more information:

https://login.cos.com/cgi-bin/account_login

 

CSR EUROPE

CSR Europe has more than 60 multinational corporations as members. The website is a source of information on corporate funding that targets young people and their initiatives.

 

For more information:

www.csreurope.org

 

EUROPEAN FOUNDATION CENTER (EFC)

Established in 1989 by seven of Europe’s leading foundations, the EFC pro­motes and underpins the work of foundations and corporate funders active in and with Europe. As part of its mission to promote philanthropy in Europe, the EFC operates a number of projects and initiatives, including the Orpheus Program, a searchable database of over 650 funder profiles.

 

For more information:

www.efc.be

 

EUROPEAN YOUTH PORTAL

European Youth Portal is the European gateway to citizenship and mobility for young people in Europe.The European Youth Portal offers European and national information of interest to young people who are living, learning and working in Europe.The portal gives information on 8 main themes, covers 31 countries and is available in 25 languages, including information about youth related funding opportunities (in Europe and worldwide).

 

For more information:

http://europa.eu/youth/portals_for_young_people/index_eu_en.html.

http://europa.eu/youth/

 

THE FOUNDATION CENTER

Supported by close to 550 foundations, the Foundation Center is a national nonprofit service organization recognized US’s leading authority on organized philanthropy, connecting nonprofits and the grant makers supporting them to tools they can use and information they can trust.Its audiences include grant­seekers, grant makers, researchers, policymakers, the media, and the general public.The Center maintains the most comprehensive database on U.S.grant makers and their grants; issues a wide variety of print, electronic, and online information resources; conducts and publishes research on trends in founda­tion growth, giving, and practice; and offers an array of free and affordable educational programs.

 

For more information:

http://foundationcenter.org

http://youth.foundationcenter.org.

 

FOUNDATIONS ONLINE

This is a directory by the Northern California (USA) Community Foundation of corporations and foundations that have their grant information and appli­cation process online.These are U.S.-based companies, but some may have international divisions, and may give to causes outside the U.S.

 

For more information:

www.foundations.org/grantmakers.html

 

FUNDRAISING FOR (AND WITH) TECHNOLOGY

This website includes general fundraising information, how to craft technology funding proposals, sample proposals, and profiles of potential givers (founda­tions and corporations).Also includes a variety of information on technology resources for nonprofits.

 

For more information:

www.npower.org

 

FUNDERS ONLINE

Funders Online is an initiative of the European Foundation Center (EFC) (www.efc.be/projects/orpheus/) and is a useful and easy-to-use web resource for youth and NGOs to determine which organizations and foundations pro­vide funding for youth-related activities. The EFC promotes and supports the work of foundations and corporate funders in Europe.

 

For more information:

www.fundersonline.org

 

GRANT MAKERS WITHOUT BORDERS (GW/OB)

A collaboration of the International Working Group and the National Network of Grant Makers, Gw/oB works “to expand and enrich progressive internation­al philanthropy” by providing free advice, alternative sources of information, and increased opportunities for communication among donors.

 

For more information:

www.internationaldonors.org

 

THE NGO CAFÉ BY THE GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH CENTER (GDRC)

The GDRC offers an easy-to-read primer about NGOs, what it means to be one, how they operate, etc.The basic objectives of the Café are to assist NGOs in enhancing and improving their programs and activities; to effect a better understanding of NGOs in general; and to enable NGOs to network at local, regional, and international levels.

 

For more information:

http://gdrc.org/ngo/

 

RESOURCE ALLIANCE

Resource Alliance (formerly known as the International Fundraising Group) seeks to enable people working in the voluntary sector throughout the world to mobilize and support local resources for their causes. They have conferences

and fundraising workshops worldwide. They also sell The Worldwide Fund­raiser’s Handbook: A Guide to Fundraising for Southern NGOs and Voluntary Organizations, by Michael Norton.

 

For more information visit:

www.resource-alliance.org

 

TECHNOLOGY GRANT NEWS

Technology Grant News has the latest grant announcements by tech funders, government and trade associations for technology and nontechnology-related initiatives for nonprofits, social service providers, towns and cities, and schools and universities.Grants are listed by such areas as technology funders teaching the math and science of technology, stepping stones to technology for children with disabilities, the digital divide, women, after-school programs, economic development, literacy, environment, conservation, and partnership funding.

 

For more information visit:

www.technologygrantnews.com

 

WORLD INITIATIVES FOR GRANT-MAKER SUPPORT

A project of the U.S.-based Council on Foundations, World Initiatives for Grant-Maker Support is a network of more than 40 grant-maker support orga­nizations devoted to strengthening philanthropy around the globe.

 

For more information:

www.wingsweb.org

 

SECTION 2: MAPPING YOUTH FUNDING IN DIFFERENT REGIONS OF THE WORLD

 

2.1.1 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WITH OPERATIONAL OR GRANT-MAKING PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE’S INITIATIVES

 

THE UNITED NATIONS AND YOUTH IN AFRICA

The UN Development Assistance Framework organizes the in-country pro­grams of agencies in terms of their specific mandates.There are some regional interventions serving youth in several countries in Africa (such as the Africa Youth Alliance [see below]), but there is no “one-stop shop” providing an over­view of the UN efforts regarding youth across the African continent.Never­theless, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Africa Portal (www.undp.org/africa) provides access to information about UN actions in general, through country offices and programs throughout Africa, including specific youth-related activities where they exist.For the most part, youth re­mains an “invisible” category, but are among the beneficiaries of larger pro­grams (MDGs, UNAIDS) and a variety of country programs.Only some UN agencies have specific programs targeting youth and children (e.g., UNICEF and UNFPA) and these may differ from country to country.Where a country

office has put in place a UN Theme Group on Youth, youth can gain more vis­ibility.One highlight for Africa as a good practice in the field of youth in the UN system is Botswana, which has a UN Theme Group on HIV/AIDS and Youth Sexual and Reproductive Health.

  • African Youth Alliance (AYA)

The AYA was a program directed at young people in four African coun­tries: Botswana, Ghana, Tanzania, and Uganda.AYA was launched in 2000 as a five-year initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Founda­tion through the United States Committee for UNFPA.A partnership of UNFPA, the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health), and Path­finder International, the program worked to improve, scale up, and insti­tutionalize HIV/AIDS prevention and adolescent reproductive health pro­grams in Botswana, Ghana, Tanzania, and Uganda.Through AYA, young people were educated about HIV/AIDS prevention and provided with nec­essary information, skills, and support to protect their health.

Between 2000 and 2005, and with a budget of US$56.7 million, the program reached over 35 million stakeholders through media campaigns.Almost 400,000 young people received life planning skills training, and over 2.5 million visits were made by young people to clinics and outreach services.

For  more information visit:

www.ayaonline.org/overview.htm

 

WORLD BANK: REACHING AFRICA’S YOUNG (RAY)

 

Within World Bank, the Africa region was the first to develop a strategic frame­work to focus on the needs of children and youth using a life cycle framework.The RAY strategic plan for 2005–15 proposes a three-pronged strategy to scale up action in three priority groups, one focusing on young people at risk, two focusing on different categories of children.Currently it is estimated that out

of Africa’s US$3.4 billion human development portfolio in the period from 1998 through 2002, some $2.4 billion reached the infant to 24 years age groups, but only $240 million targeted the most vulnerable groups.RAY envisions sig­nificant scaling up of analytical work, capacity building, and lending using existing instruments (e.g., multicountry AIDS programs, Poverty Reduction Support Credits (PRSCs), education programs, health programs, social funds, urban programs) as well as new instruments (e.g., conditional cash transfers, safety nets, community financing, and subregional programs).

 

For more information contact:

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTCY/0,,contentMDK:20248903~pagePK:210058~piPK:210062~theSitePK:396445,00.html

2.1.2 REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WITH OPERATIONAL OR GRANT-MAKING PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE’S INITIATIVES

THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (AFDB) AND THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND (ADF)

The AfDB is a multilateral development bank whose shareholders include 53 African countries and 24 non-African countries from the Americas, Asia, and Europe.It was established in 1964 and officially began operations in 1967.The group’s primary objective is to promote sustainable economic growth in or­der to reduce poverty in Africa.It achieves this objective by financing a broad range of development projects and programs in five topical areas, including poverty reduction and regional integration, and with many projects that have young people as their primary beneficiaries.During its 40 years of operations, AfDB has disbursed over 3,000 loans and grants totaling over US$50 billion.

As a more specific instrument, AfDB launched the ADF in 1974.ADF’s ob­jective is the promotion of economic and social development in 38 least-developed African countries by providing concessional funding for projects and programs, as well as technical assistance for studies and capacity-building activities.In 2008, US$3.1 billion were disbursed to projects in areas including

infrastructure development, environment, agriculture and rural development, and social services.Among the latter, education represents an important target of ADF funding, and projects supported recently included:

The African Virtual University: This project contributes to human resources development by strengthening the institutional capacity of a network of insti­tutions coordinated by the African Virtual University to deliver and manage quality Information-and-Communication-Technology-assisted education and training opportunities in the region.ADF funding: US$9.3 million.

Alternative Learning and Skills Development Project, Tanzania: This proj­ect contributes to human resources development by providing access to alter­native learning, skills, and employment opportunities to out-of-school youth.ADF funding: US$12.2 million.

Post-primary Education and Training Project, Uganda: Over a period of five years, the project will improve and expand school facilities, as well as their management and teaching quality.This project will include environmental improvements in the schools through rehabilitation, and expansion of learn­ing and accommodation spaces, sanitation, water supply and landscaping, and training on school facilities maintenance.A total of 100,000 additional pupils will gain access to education.ADF funding: US$96.6 million.

Support to Education in Zambia: The project contributes to increased access to, equity, and quality of basic education of children in Zambia.These goals are being met by constructing 188 classrooms at 42 rural schools, providing teach­ing materials for 65,000 pupils, and training 500 teacher-trainers and 10,000 teachers over a period of four years.ADF funding: US$15.8 million.

Support to Education Sector Development, Eritrea: The project supports improved access to elementary-level education by constructing additional classrooms in existing schools located in underserved areas.The project will also construct and furnish two hostels to ensure continuity of education up to the middle school level for highly disadvantaged girls.In-service training, distance education, instruction materials and equipment, and teacher-training

scholarships will be provided to ensure a sufficient number of qualified teach­ers.ADF funding: US$34.6 million.

Support to the Strategic Action Plan for Vocational Education and Train­ing, Tanzania: By establishing regional training centers, this project provides access to vocational training to young people in peripheral rural areas.The new facilities not only benefit the education of rural youth but enhance region­al development and quality of life for inhabitants more broadly.ADF funding: US$29.4 million.

For more information:

www.afdb.org

www.afdb.org/en/projects-operations/project-portfolio/.

 

AFRICAN UNION (AU)

Founded in 1964, the AU is the continent’s principal organization for the pro­motion of accelerated socioeconomic integration, with the aim of creating greater unity and solidarity among African countries and peoples.It focuses on the promotion of peace, security, and stability on the continent as a prereq­uisite for the implementation of the development and integration agenda of the Union.Given their demographic importance, young people are seen by the AU as a key vehicle for implementing its objectives of peace, unity, and prosperity.

In this pursuit, a key vehicle was launched in 2005 with the Economic, Social and Cultural Council of the AU.The Council marks a new course for the AU as it responds to calls for democracy and development from Africa’s vibrant civil society institutions.The rich and diverse human and institutional resources at the grassroots level in Africa are to become part of new partnerships between the governments and all segments of the society.One of the key functions of the Council is to “forge strong partnerships between governments and all seg­ments of the civil society, in particular women, the youth, children, the Dias­pora, organized labor, the private sector, and professional groups.” The Council

formed a number of sectoral cluster committees, including several that are of particular relevance for young people: peace and security; social affairs and health; human resources, science, and technology; and women and gender.

For more information:

www.africa-union.org/root/au/index/index.htm

 

COMMONWEALTH YOUTH PROGRAM (CYP) AFRICA

The CYP Africa center is located in Lusaka, Zambia, and is one of four centers established to serve the member countries of the Commonwealth.CYP Africa responds to youth development for 20 countries, including Botswana, Camer­oon, Cyprus, Ghana, The Gambia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Malta, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swazi­land, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

CYP Africa has four strategic program areas aimed at improving the condi­tion of young people in Africa: Youth Enterprise and Sustainable Livelihoods; Governance; Development and Youth Networks; Youth Work Education and Training.Through these program areas, CYP Africa:

  • provides skills, resources, and contacts for young people to create their own business ventures;
  • strengthens youth governance and youth networks so that they serve young people more effectively;
  • develops youth work as a profession;
  • works with governments to create value for the contributions young people make in running their countries;
  • provides learning tools, models, Commonwealth experiences, and best practices in youth development across countries and regions;
  • provides opportunities to use information and communication technology (ICT) to support young people and their development;
  • builds youth leadership and decision making;
  • helps young people play a greater part in economic and social development;
  • provides a platform for advocacy and mainstreaming youth development in the work of multilateral development agencies.

For example, CYP Africa engages in human resource development efforts through professional training courses in Youth in Development Work and de­livers a CYP diploma course, as well as short courses relevant to youth develop­ment skills.The Commonwealth Diploma in Youth in Development Work is an 18- month distant education course covering various development needs of working with young people and development in general.

In addition, CYP Africa has formed a regional youth caucus, a network of young people from across Africa.One of the caucus’ initiatives is its annual Innovative Projects Award that was launched in 2008.Three projects were sup­ported in 2008 and 2009:

  • increasing youth participation in policy processes and democratic gover­nance, Cameroon;
  • reducing the burden of HIV/AIDS among out-of-school youth in Kalumbu Lilongwe, Malawi;
  • interschool peace building and fighting tribalism, Kenya.

For more information visit:

www.thecommonwealth.org/subhomepage/152819/home

www.thecommonwealth.org/Internal/152819/152849/about_us/.

 

COMMUNITY OF PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE COUNTRIES [COMUNIDADE DE PAÍSES LÍNGUA PORTUGUESA] (CPLP)

The CPLP was formed in 1996 with seven countries: Portugal, Brazil (a for­mer colony in South America), and five former colonies in Africa: Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, and São Tomé and Príncipe.East Timor joined the community in 2002 after independence.The CPLP is a bloc under construction, and the societies of the eight member nations have little knowledge of each other.One unique feature of the CPLP is that its members

are linked by a common language and shared cultural features, which form a bridge among countries separated by great distances and on different conti­nents.The CPLP has some programs relevant to youth in Africa, including its HIV/Aids Program, which is designed to help the five African member states, and the Center for the Development of Entrepreneurial Skills that is being es­tablished in Luanda, Angola.

 

For more information visit:

www.cplp.org/Default.aspx

 

THE INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION OF THE FRANCOPHONIE [ORGANISATION INTERNATIONALE DE LA FRANCOPHONIE] (OIF), AFRICA

The OIF includes among its members more than 20 African states.As part of its global programming, OIF has an operational youth program that aims to support the development of young people’s active and responsible citizen­ship and works with youth up to the age of 30.OIF’s three main areas of pro­gramming for and with youth are: (1) meetings among French-speaking young people about issues of society, politics, and policymaking that concern them; (2) technical assistance to member states to reinforce their national youth poli­cies and intersectoral policies that affect young people; and (3) support and encouragement of French-speaking young people to get involved in the Fran­cophonie volunteer program (Voluntariat Francophone).

For more information:

www.francophonie.org/ressources/programmation.cfm.

2.1.3 ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FUNDING FOR YOUTH PROJECTS

THE AFRICAN YOUTH FOUNDATION (AYF)

The AYF is a nonprofit development organization based in Bonn, Germany, with a regional office in Accra, Ghana.It was established in 2000 to aid young Africans in Africa and its diaspora, as well as Europeans of African descent, to undertake projects that will enable them to obtain skills necessary for their fu­ture livelihoods.The organization specializes in training young people in busi­ness and entrepreneurial skills through the help of local business institutions.AYF promotes self-awareness, researches development conditions in African countries, and analyzes favorable conditions for development and participa­tion of youth in social life.Detailed information is on the website.The follow­ing are important programs:

ADLER Entrepreneurship Award: Awarded to acknowledge the accomplish­ments of Africans in Europe and Africa, it is presented to Africans and people of African descent who have made a significant contribution to the develop­ment of their communities.The award encourages these civic efforts and show­cases their impact on their communities on the local, national, and interna­tional level.Awards are given in five areas: civil society, legal, health, media, and African businesses.The award does not include a monetary prize but com­munity and society acknowledgement.A list of past award winners is available at Experts for Africa is a service to promote the flow of volunteer experts, teach­ers, and other professionals to Africa.AYF encourages professionals of all walks of life to volunteer their time and expertise to assist Africa.AYF matches the needs of carefully chosen institutions in Africa with volunteer experts.

Progressive Educational Fund, established by the AYF, supports disadvan­taged youth in Africa.Through a website, profiles of best students in African countries are submitted to encourage Africans in the diaspora, as well as fund

ing institutions.These profiled individuals receive funding for leadership, busi­ness, and management courses, as well as IT training in Africa.

Universal Leaders’ Group Initiative: Started by the AYF in 2005, the group provides an informal, efficient framework where young professionals in diverse fields such as entrepreneurship, investments, education, and development can have an ongoing exchange of opinions, knowledge, and experience on strate­gic issues.

For more information:

www.ayf.de

www.ayf.de/activities/awards.html.

www.ulg.ayf.de

YOUTH ACTION INTERNATIONAL (YAI)

YAI is a global nonprofit effort to rebuild war-torn African communities.YAI is run by a network of young international leaders who are defining a new ap­proach to delivering humanitarian aid.By leveraging the use of local materials and employing local people, YAI maximizes the economic and social impact of programs that include building schools and playgrounds as well as microlend­ing.It runs projects in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Uganda.Specific program ac­tivities include small business development (including microloans), vocational training, agriculture and farming support, targeted scholarships, and health care and awareness raising.In 2008, YAI had an operating budget of approximately US$350,000, funded by USAID, corporate and individual donors in the U.S., and several American foundations.YAI has three main thematic orientations:

Early Childhood Development Program: targets children between ages 5 and 12 and focuses on positive early childhood development by providing basic in­dividual and school-related necessities, homework assistance and support, and safe, structured environments for play and learning.Specific program activities include after-school programming, teacher training, school and library con­struction, support to orphaned and abandoned children and youth, financial literacy support, and medical assistance.

“Opportunity Meets Preparation” Program for Women: targets women ages 13 to 32.This program focuses on supporting the needs and development of women affected by war and girls at risk of sexual exploitation or domestic vi­olence.It aims to equip and prepare young girls and women with informa­tion and opportunities that can allow for self-sufficiency and independence.Specific program activities include workshops and training sessions geared at women’s capacity building, microcredit and startup kits to help women to start their own businesses, and information on primary childcare as well as mater­nal health issues.

Youth Development and Empowerment Program: targets 13 to 32 year-olds and focuses on promoting the wellbeing and empowerment of war-affected youths, former child soldiers, formerly abducted children, and children associ­ated with fighting forces.Specific program activities include vocational and job training and placement, the promotion of youth talent in the arts and sports, ag­riculture and farming support, youth resource centers, training in program de­velopment and management, and scholarship initiative for university education.

YAI operates in three nations.

Liberia: YAI operates two programs in the country.Within its early childhood development program, YAI supports a school library in Gardnersville, the Becky Primary School in the Kakata community, and several orphanages and playgrounds.Under the youth development and empowerment programs, YAI assists women’s centers, a former child soldiers reintegration and health proj­ect, youth and computer resource centers, and others.

Sierra Leone: The early childhood development program organizes play-based workshops to train financial literacy, and provides teacher training and sup­plies to schools in the Waterloo Refugee Camp as well as the Milton Margai School for the Blind.The youth development and empowerment programs as­sist a project to reclaim lands devastated by mining in Kono district and to make land available to young people, and supports a women’s center in Free­town that provides training and microcredit loans to 150 women.

Uganda: The MYDEL vocational skills training program provides training to the marginalized youth in slum areas in Kampala.The Rakai agriculture initia­tive provides 150 families with seeds for subsistence farming.Later support is planned to develop community grain stores and support animal farming in the community of Rakai.The Jinja community empowerment program is an income-generating project for 2,500 people in the Jinja district.The Gulu em­powerment program supports 50 formerly abducted child-mothers with seed money for starting businesses to improve on their lives.The Amuru youth em­powerment program helps 45 young people to start commercial honey pro­duction.

For information visit:

www.youthactioninternational.org

 

2.1.4 OTHER INTERESTING FUNDING INITIATIVES

 

AFRICA FILES

Africa Files is a network of volunteers committed to promoting African per­spectives and alternative analyses for human rights and economic justice in Africa.It is active in the fields of information and research and was launched in 2002 by former volunteers in two well-established groups based in Toronto, the Economic Rights in Southern Africa group of the Inter-Church Coalition on Africa and the Toronto Committee for the Liberation of Southern Africa.When these groups ceased operation in 2001, members from each group came together to explore ways to continue their work and express their solidarity

with Africa.It is also a useful and up-to-date information resource for youth-related activities.Within Africa Files, there are several important initiatives:

Action Focus: This platform takes action on specific Africa-related human rights and justice issues.Some Action Focus items target major issues involv­ing Africa and offer alternative analyses and responses, with a more radical perspective than is often found in government and mainstream media sources.Other Action Focus items are direct calls for immediate urgent action coming from Amnesty International or Africa Files’ sister organizations.Action often involves writing letters to members of Parliament or other leaders on specific issues, or solidarity messages with those suffering injustice.

Africa InfoServ: This free e-mail information service features up-to-date re­ports on African events, issues, and people, drawn from a variety of sources, including News From Africa, All Africa News Agency, IRIN, New People, SARDC, Inter-Press Service, Women’s E-News, and E-Africa, as well as other news groups and individuals.Among its 18 thematic categories is one dedi­cated to youth and children. At Issue Ezine: This web resource was launched in February 2005 by Africa Files to publish well-researched, provocative, and insightful original articles on important current themes in sub-Saharan Africa.

For more information:

www.africafiles.org

www.africafiles.org/youthchildren.asp.

 

FRIENDS OF AFRICA INTERNATIONAL (FAI)

FAI was founded in 2005 with the mission to promote human rights, social justice, democracy, and good governance in Africa.It provides policy advice, advocacy, training, and resources to regional and international institutions through its multifaceted programs in Africa.Program areas include human rights and democracy, women’s rights, youth and development, HIV/AIDS, peace and security, and economic and socio-cultural rights.

FAI organizes the Pan African Youth Leadership Forum, first held in Ghana in 2007, and then in Egypt in 2008.The goal of the Pan African Youth Leadership Forum is to provide African youth with the essential education and training necessary for leadership, and to offer a forum for youth to share their unique knowledge and experiences among colleagues.

For more information visit:

www.fafrica.org/index.html

 

NORTH–SOUTH CENTER, COUNCIL OF EUROPE

The European Center for Global Interdependence and Solidarity, more com­monly known as the North-South Center, was set up by the Council of Europe in Lisbon, Portugal, in May 1990.It has the dual objective of advancing Eu­ropean cooperation to heighten public awareness of global interdependence issues, and of promoting policies of solidarity, respect for human rights, de­mocracy, and social cohesion.A specific objective of the North-South Center is to provide training and capacity building of young people and youth organiza­tions outside of Europe, and several programs are undertaken addressing Af­rican youth.

Africa-Europe Training Course for Youth Organizations: This long-term training course for trainers on Africa-Europe youth cooperation is held an­nually or bi-annually.Over the period of one year, 30 trainers per course par­ticipate in a curriculum that consists of four elements: two week-long residen­tial training seminars, a practice phase, a virtual learning and communication platform, and a mentoring process.In so doing, the course hopes to strengthen the role of youth organizations as civil society actors, and to advance active citizenship among young people in Africa and Europe.It focuses building the capacity of multipliers in youth organizations in Europe and Africa, and equip­ping them with skills necessary for Africa–Europe cooperation programs.Past courses took place in 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2008.

Africa-Europe Youth Summit: Taking place Lisbon, Portugal, in 2007, the summit brought together 250 youth representatives of Africa and Europe, and 60 observers, representing governments, regional and international organiza­tions, and media.It aimed to increase young people’s participation in Euro-African cooperation and to reinforce youth work in Africa and Europe by in­fluencing the youth policy.The summit concluded with a final declaration that was delivered to the heads of state during the second EU-Africa Summit.

African University on Youth and Development: Taking place for the first time in 2009, the African University on Youth and Development aimed at cre­ating a space for debate and reflection, affirmative youth action and promotion of youth policies, training and non-formal education, as well as intercultural and interregional dialogue within the context of Euro-African youth coop­eration and the follow-up of the Africa Europe Youth Summit.One hundred youth leaders from Africa and Europe came together in Tarrafal, Cape Verde, for a week to live and learn together and to co-develop training activities and political participation of youth in the context of Euro-African cooperation.The university is organized by the North-South Center of the Council of Eu­rope in partnership with the National Youth Council of Portugal, Cape Verde Federation of Youth, the European Youth Forum, and the Pan-African Youth Union, with the support of the European Commission and the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (CPLP).Detailed information is available at www.coe.int/t/dg4/nscentre/Youth%5CUYD%5CUYD_EA1_en.pdf.

For more information visit:

www.coe.int/t/dg4/nscentre/default_en.asp.

www.coe.int/t/dg4/nscentre/Youth%5CUYD%5CUYD_EA1_LTTC_en.pdf.

www.coe.int/t/dg4/nscentre/Youth%5CYouth_Summit%5Cconcept_paper_Africa_Europe_Youth_Summit_en.pdf

 

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT NETWORK (YEN)

YEN is a partnership of the United Nations, the International Labor Organi­zation, and the World Bank.YEN was created in 2001 to mobilize action on

the commitment of the Millennium Summit for decent and productive work for young people.YEN is a global platform to prioritize youth employment on the development agenda and to exchange ideas on policies and programs to improve employment opportunities for youth.The network includes de­velopment agencies, governments, the private sector, youth groups, and other NGOs.To date, YEN has mobilized US$7 million for its activities, with current support from the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida) and the UK Department of Work and Pensions.It has developed and disseminated var­ious publications and advocacy products on youth employment, and trained over 1,500 youth representatives as advocates on youth employment.In Africa, YEN operates several programs.

Competitive Grant Scheme supports youth employment projects in the Mano River Union (MRU) (Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone).The program identifies and supports small-scale, innovative projects with potential to provide employment opportunities for young people while allowing youth organizations to actively participate in development.Youth organizations have firsthand experience of the needs of young people but need financial or tech­nical support to reach their goals.Grants of US$2,000 to $50,000 are awarded to projects that contribute to youth employment in several areas: community projects and services, transition from school to work, vocational training for young people, youth entrepreneurship, and economic empowerment of young women.

The selection criteria for projects supported under the Competitive Grant Scheme are:

  • Target: aim at improving the employment opportunities for young people between the ages of 15 and 30.
  • Innovation: extent to which the proposed project differs from existing ap­proaches.YEN is particularly interested in projects that introduce a new approach, process, or technology.
  • Sustainability: organizational capacity and expertise to continue the activi­ties after the end of grant funding.
  • Results and Measurability: well-defined and quantifiable outcomes and out­puts.
  • Growth Potential: potential of the project to be applied on a larger scale or replicated elsewhere.
  • Partnerships: potential to initiate strategic alliances and bring different stakeholders together.
  • Gender equity: promote inclusion and active participation of young women.

The Private Sector Initiative (PSI) is a project of YEN’s subregional office for West Africa.The PSI is a multistakeholder platform for business action on youth employment supported by the UK’s Department of Work and Pen­sions.The PSI aims to strengthen the role that business in West Africa can play in enhancing employment opportunities for youth.To achieve this task, the initiative is divided into three areas of action.Under knowledge develop­ment, it seeks to take stock of existing and planned business sponsored youth employment interventions.Under network building, it brings together private sector representatives and civil society organizations to advocate for and share experiences on business support for youth employment.Finally, this project works closely with its network partners to match business interests in the field of youth employment with existing or possible intersectoral partnerships on youth employment in the subregion.

For more information visit:

 www.ilo.org/public/english/employment/yen/index.htm

 

2.2.1 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WITH REGION-SPECIFIC OPERATION OR GRANT-MAKING PROGRAMS SUPPORTING YOUNG PEOPLE’S INITIATIVES

EU/UNFPA COOPERATION ON YOUTH SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH (RHIYA)

RHIYA expands on the successful multicountry intervention: the EC/UNFPA Initiative for Reproductive Health in Asia (RHI).The RHIYA continues the successful collaboration among the European Union, UNFPA, and European and local NGOs toward improving the sexual and reproductive health of the most vulnerable populations, especially young people, in South and Southeast Asia.Partnering with NGOs and governments, RHIYA aims to improve the sexual and reproductive health of young people between the ages of 10 and 24, through information and education campaigns, the provision of youth-friend­ly services, and the development of advocacy initiatives.

 

For more information visit:

www.asia-initiative.org

 

THE UNITED NATIONS

Although some regional UN interventions are serving youth in several coun­tries in the region, there is no “one-stop shop” providing an overview of the UN efforts regarding youth across Asia and the Pacific.Nevertheless, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Asia portal provides access to information about UN action in general, through country offices and regional programs, including specific youth-related activities where they exist.In addition, among the aims of three regional centers is the manage­ment of knowledge on best practices.

 

For more information:

Bangkok: http://regionalcentrebangkok.undp.or.th/

Colombo: www.undprcc.lk

Fiji: http://regionalcentrepacific.undp.org.fj/

(www.undp.org/asia/)

 

WORLD BANK IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION

The World Bank has identified two main issues as the key priorities for gov­ernments in the Asia-Pacific region and its own work with youth.First, youth unemployment rates may be up to four times the adult rate in some countries.Often a primary reason is that, while many youth in the region may have access to primary education, there is little access to secondary or tertiary education, resulting in inadequate skills.Even those youth who do benefit from higher education may find their skills to be irrelevant, as the education system may not be geared toward meeting the demands of the labor market.The need to reform education systems in the region is not helped by the decrease in spend­ing on education over recent years.Second, conflict and instability have also affected youth prospects because of the effect on the economy, interruption of education, government failure to provide basic services, and youth who may play a key role in the instability, whether fighting for independence in Timor-Leste, protesting government repression in Indonesia, or engaging in criminal activities as part of street gangs in Papua New Guinea.

In addressing these problems faced by young people, the World Bank has de­veloped a mix of programs to work with youth in the East Asia and Pacific region:

Grants: World Bank offices in some countries provide grants focused on youth.In Cambodia, for example, NGOs that engage youth may apply to re­ceive grants from the Small Grants Program.Vietnam Innovation Day 2006 and the Papua New Guinea Development Marketplace 2006 also gave grants.

to organizations with the most innovative ideas dealing with youth-focused development challenges.

Training: Some offices also engage in training programs for youth.In China, for example, the World Bank is involved in peer education programs for HIV/AIDS prevention, and in training young women in rural areas to increase their employability.

Dialogues: Bank offices throughout the region engage youth in dialogue about development at the local level, for example, through the Public Information Centers, information-sharing workshops, and internships, and also by con­necting youth across countries through the Global Distance Learning Network.

For more information visit:

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/EASTASIAPACIFICEXT/EXTEAPREGTOPSOCDEV/0,,contentMDK:20327368~pagePK:34004173~piPK:34003707~theSitePK:502940,00.html

http://web.worldbank.org/external/default/main?menuPK=502973&pagePK=34004168&piPK=34004429&theSitePK=502940.

2.2.2 REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WITH OPERATIONAL OR GRANT-MAKING PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE’S INITIATIVES

THE ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN NATIONS (ASEAN)

ASEAN was established in 1967 in Bangkok by Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philip­pines, Singapore, and Thailand, later joined by Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myan­mar, and Cambodia.It aims to accelerate economic growth, social progress, and cultural development and to promote regional peace and stability through abid­ing respect for justice and the rule of law in the relationship among countries in the region and adherence to the principles of the United Nations Charter.

ASEAN has an elaborate framework of cooperation mechanisms for youth pol­icy development and involvement of young people in the development of the region.Overseen by an ASEAN ministerial meeting on youth that convenes.once every two years, youth cooperation is directed by the Work Program on Preparing ASEAN Youth for Sustainable Development.The Work Program serves as the major channel for pursuing ASEAN cooperation in youth devel­opment, and outlines the following four priority areas: policy development; promoting ASEAN awareness and civic responsibility; promoting employabil­ity of youth; and information exchange and partnership.Numerous activities are conducted to implement the Work Program, including:

  • annual ASEAN Youth Day Meetings and ASEAN Youth Day Awards;
  • an ASEAN Youth Leadership Development Program to promote the con­cept of youth leadership, policy formulation, and youth volunteers;
  • a Regional Capacity-Building Workshop to Promote Youth-Initiated Enter­prises for government officials and young entrepreneurs to promote youth entrepreneurship;
  • a regional Youth Caucus that provides opportunities for youth representa­tives to present their discussions to the ministerial level on themes such as education, environment, employment and entrepreneurship, and commu­nity engagement.

 

For more information visit:

www.aseansec.org

www.aseanyouth.org

 

ASEAN FOUNDATION

The ASEAN Foundation was established in December 1997 during ASEAN’s 30th Anniversary Commemorative Summit.Its mission is to contribute to shared prosperity and a sustainable future to all ten ASEAN member coun­tries: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam.Funding for the foundation comes from the governments of the member countries, as well as from Japan, China, France, Canada, and several global corporations.

The ASEAN Foundation carries out a range of activities, including:

  • projects to promote education, training, science and technology, health, and cultural life;
  • assistance to uplift the social condition of the peoples in the ASEAN region;
  • fellowships to support exchanges of ASEAN youths and students;
  • collaborative work among academics, professionals, and scientists.

Projects supported by the ASEAN Foundation must meet the following re­quirements:

  • be consistent with the objectives and priorities of the ASEAN Foundation;
  • address one of the fields of science and technology, environment, culture and information, social development (youth, women, health and nutrition, education, labor affairs, disaster management, HIV/AIDS prevention and control, children, population, and rural development and poverty eradica­tion), drug matters, or civil service;
  • address a regional issue and benefit all ASEAN member countries;
  • be sustainable, co-financed from other sources of funding, and achievable within a specified period of time;
  • benefit people at the grassroots level directly.

At present, the combined funding from these donors totals US$4.3 million, of which the foundation supports its grant-making, operational programs, and the building of its endowment.

For more information visit:

www.aseanfoundation.org

THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (ADB)

ADB is an international development finance institution whose mission is to help its developing member countries reduce poverty and improve the quality of life of their populations.Established in 1966 and headquartered in Manila, the Philippines, ADB is owned and financed by its 67 members, of which 48 are from the region and 19 are from other parts of the globe.ADB’s main partners.

are governments, the private sector, NGOs, development agencies, commu­nity-based organizations, and foundations.Under Strategy 2020, a long-term strategic framework adopted in 2008, ADB will follow three complementary strategic agendas: inclusive growth, environmentally sustainable growth, and regional integration.In pursuing its vision, ADB’s main instruments include loans, technical assistance, grants, advice, and knowledge.

ADB interacts with a broad range of civil society organizations through opera­tional cooperation and dialogue.NGOs, community-based organizations, la­bor unions, and foundations are among ADB’s partners in fighting poverty and promoting prosperity in the Asia and Pacific region.ADB’s experience shows that cooperation with civil society organizations can improve the effectiveness, quality, and sustainability of ADB-assisted activities.

A special instrument of ADB, the Asian Development Fund (ADF), since 1973 has served to support equitable and sustainable development for the region.It offers loans at very low interest rates and grants that help reduce poverty in ADB’s poorest borrowing countries.It is currently in its tenth round of fund­ing, with ADF X covering the 2009–12 period.The previous ADF IX funded 54 projects totaling US$1.1 billion.

For more information visit:

www.adb.org

www.adb.org/ADF/default.asp.

www.adb.org/Projects

 

COMMONWEALTH YOUTH PROGRAM (CYP), ASIA

CYP, established in 1973, advocates the effective participation of young women and men in the development process and for social transformation, and aims at their full engagement at all levels of decision making.The program is financed by a special fund consisting of voluntary contributions from member governments.

CYP Asia is based at a regional center in Chandigarh, India.The Asia Cen­ter responds to youth development for eight countries of the Commonwealth.Similar to other regional centers, it does so with a focus on three strategic pro­gram areas:

  • youth enterprise and sustainable livelihoods;
  • governance, development, and youth networks;
  • youth work, education, and training.

A considerable part of CYP Asia’s work addresses young people and HIV/AIDS.In January 2001, the Asian Youth Ambassadors for Positive Living (YAPL) pro­gram was launched and the Asia Center started work to raise awareness of AIDS and other effects of high-risk behavior in Asia.This program was ini­tially developed by the CYP Africa Center using the services of young people living with HIV/AIDS to create awareness on issues, such as HIV/AIDS and drug abuse that affect the lives of other young people.

For more information visit:

www.thecommonwealth.org/subhomepage/152929/

 

THE SECRETARIAT OF THE PACIFIC COMMUNITY (SPC)

One of the world’s oldest regional organizations, the SPC, formerly known as the South Pacific Commission, was established in 1947.It is a nonpolitical, technical assistance and research body with a consultative and advisory role that serves all 22 countries and territories of the Pacific.SPC works toward a secure and prosperous Pacific community, whose people are healthy and man­age their resources in an economically, environmentally, and socially sustain­able way.SPC has developed an integrated work program to pursue its goals.This combination of diverse disciplines offers a unique approach to the devel­opment of the region’s land, marine, and human resources.The organization’s current work program focuses on the following sectors:

  • Land resources;
  • Agriculture and forestry;
  • Marine resources;
  • coastal and oceanic fisheries, maritime;
  • Social resources;
  • Community education, culture, women, and youth;
  • Demography, population, and statistics;
  • Information and communication technology, media production and training; and
  • Public health.

In 2005, the Pacific Youth Ministers adopted the Pacific Youth Strategy 2010 as the regional framework for youth development in the region.To enable SPC and stakeholders, including national governments and development partners, to respond effectively to youth issues in the Pacific region, the strategy focuses on priority initiatives to be implemented from 2006 to 2010, including access­ing integrated education; nurturing sustainable livelihoods; promoting healthy lifestyles; building stronger communities; strengthening institutional capacity, youth, and identities; and gathering research information and data on youth.

For more information:

www.spc.int/hdp

 

THE SINGAPORE-ASEAN YOUTH FUND

The Singapore-ASEAN Youth Fund was launched in 2007 and is administered by the National Youth Council of Singapore.It is an initiative of Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Community Development, Youth, and Sports, with the main aim of promoting greater interaction among youth in the ASEAN member countries.The fund supports partnerships among ASEAN youth and youth sector organizations, thus contributing to greater un­derstanding and closer ties within the ASEAN community.The fund aims to foster unity in ASEAN youth and promote greater awareness of ASEAN inter­nationally.

The fund supports projects that meet the following criteria:

  • projects are in line with the laws of the participating countries;
  • projects do not engage in any proselytizing of religion or political ideolo­gies, and respect the religious, ethnic, and political sensitivities of the par­ticipating countries;
  • projects are open to participation of youths from all ASEAN member states and involve as many ASEAN member states as possible;
  • projects promote a better understanding of ASEAN cultures among ASEAN youths;
  • applications are endorsed by the relevant national youth focal point;
  • proposals include an action plan to generate greater awareness of ASEAN among youths in the region;
  • projects meet at least one of the following four focus areas: Building a Com­munity of Caring Societies, Managing the Social Impact of Economic In­tegration, Promoting Environmental Sustainability, Promoting an ASEAN identity.

Over the five years until 2011, the fund has a budget of US$3.3 million.The fund is open to youth organizations and national youth focal points (contact persons for youth affairs) from ASEAN member countries.

For more information visit:

www.nyc.pa.gov.sg

 

2.2.3 ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FUNDING FOR YOUTH PROJECTS

THE ASIA-EUROPE FOUNDATION (ASEF)

ASEF was established in 1997 by 25 European and East Asian countries, to­gether with the European Commission, all of which are partners of the Europe-Asia Meeting.ASEF is funded by voluntary contributions from its partner gov­ernments, with a budget in 2008 of US$5.1 million.Most of ASEF projects are also supported financially by civil society organizations, public institutions, and the enterprises ASEF works with.ASEF is a foundation that.

  • advances mutual understanding and collaboration between the people of Asia and Europe through intellectual, cultural, and people-to-people ex­changes;
  • acts as the civil society outreach of the Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM), and works as a platform for Asia-Europe dialogue to stimulate permanent net­works that reinforce Asia-Europe bi-regional relations; and
  • acts as an interface between civil society and ASEM governments, and con­sequently contributes to the ASEM process by generating unique recom­mendations for officials’ consideration.

With the objective of fostering future partnerships and cooperation while stimulating greater mobility for the next generation of Asian and European leaders, ASEF engages young volunteers, activists, trainers, artists, students, and others in sustainable networks.The activities are targeted at various youth constituencies from the fields of education, the arts, politics, and the economy.All programs provide a long-term foundation for building continuing dialogue and encouraging institutional contacts and collaborations.Some of its recent youth projects include:

Asia-Europe Network for Sustainable Development: The Asia-Europe Net­work for Sustainable Development is a partnership that enhances interregional cooperation between Asian and European youth with the intent of achieving a culture of sustainable development.This informal network of youth orga­nizations from Asia and Europe aims to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences between and among partner organizations; encourage consensus building on thematic issues and concerns among the partner orga­nizations; present opportunities for coordinated activities and programs; and highlight positive contributions of youths and youth organizations in the cam­paign for sustainable development.

Asia-Europe Training Course on Global Education in Local Youth Work “Glocal Appetizer”: Held in Mollina, Spain, in September 2009, this training course focused on developing the capacities of youth organizations to identify and implement global education methodologies in their current activities.

bringing a global dimension to their work.The training course, which included 24 participants between the ages of 18 and 30, motivated youth trainers active in the area of global education, youth training, capacity building, and formal and non-formal education who were recommended by national and interna­tional organizations and are nationals from the ASEM countries

Asia-Europe Training for Trainers: Held in Tokyo, Japan, in February 2009, this training course focused on middle and long-term youth voluntary service as a tool for community development in Asia and Europe.Participants came from sending and hosting organizations involved in youth voluntary service from across the ASEM countries.

Asia-Europe Young Leaders Symposium: The 11th edition of this symposium took place in Madrid, Spain, in November 2008, with a focus on young urban leadership.The dialogue brought together 44 motivated young urban leaders, forward-looking professionals belonging to or whose field of expertise is based in capital or major cities or regions of ASEM member countries.The main outcomes of the dialogue are the Madrid Declaration, a document in which the participants identified issues of major concern for the urban areas, and the creation of the Asia-Europe Network of Young Urban Leaders.

Asia-Europe Training for Trainers on Intercultural Learning and Cultural Diversity: The Asia-Europe Training for Trainers on Intercultural Learning took place in May 2007, in Manila, the Philippines.It brought together 28 rep­resentatives of youth organizations in 22 ASEM countries to work on the de­velopment of skills and exchange of best practices on intercultural learning, by providing them with an innovative approach regarding intercultural capacities beyond stereotypes and prejudices.The training was co-organized by ASEF and the Philippines National Youth Commission, in close cooperation with the Coordinating Committee for International Voluntary Service and the Interna­tional Cultural Youth Exchange.It contained structured learning exercises and daily reflections, simulation games, and cultural exchange.

 

For more information:

www.asef.org/index.php?option=com_theme&task=view&id=3&Itemid=144.

 

SAMSUNG DIGITALL HOPE

Samsung DigitAll Hope is a youth-themed social responsibility program launched by Samsung in 2003.It awards grants to social organizations work­ing to use technology for improving the lives of disadvantaged young people in eight countries: Australia, Singapore, India, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, and the Philippines.Projects are awarded financial support over a period of three years.

Sao Mai Center for Visually Impaired, Vietnam: Central to this project was the development of four computer training centers for visually impaired youth in rural regions.In addition, the project developed localized training materials for the visually impaired.

Don Bosco, Philippines: Geared at youth in rural areas, 12 e-learning centers were established in rural areas in 2004 to provide young people with Internet access.Through this access, education and training programs were delivered online.

Knowledge Channel, Philippines: Founded in 1999, the Knowledge Chan­nel is an all-educational TV channel on cable and satellite.It airs instructional videos that support the Philippine Department of Education’s curriculum, as well as non-curriculum titles for an older audience.It also has weekly news and public affairs programs.

For more information visit:

www.itu.int/osg/spu/ni/wsisbridges/linked_docs/presentations/24%20June%20pdf/Samsung_LEE.pdf

 

YOUTH SOCIAL ENTERPRISE INITIATIVE (YSEI)

YSEI is a high-engagement social venture program for emerging young social entrepreneurs in developing countries in Asia.YSEI was founded in 2005 as a multi-stakeholder partnership, and it receives support from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, UNESCO, and the Canadian International Development Agency.YSEI program principles are to:

  • build and maintain multi-stakeholder partnerships with academia, civil so­ciety, government, and the private sector that are critical to building strong support networks for young social entrepreneurs;
  • reach out to work with disadvantaged youth, as well as marginalized and underrepresented groups in society;
  • promote of gender equality and human rights by ending discrimination.

Through the Emergence Fellowship, YSEI invests in young visionaries who have big ideas and who need crucial startup support to turn their ideas into action.The startup support includes financing of up to US$15,000, develop­ment knowledge and tools on social entrepreneurship, technical consulting through mentorship, and access to diverse networks.Current fellowship proj­ects include:

Elevyn, Malaysia: This project supports artisans in remote areas of Malaysia.To generate income on a fair trade basis, Elevyn is using an innovative, web 2.0-based, online platform that links the selling of handmade products to the support of social and environmental causes.

LetIThelp, Philippines: LetIThelp solves structural unemployment and un­deremployment problems in poor communities by providing capacity build­ing on specific IT skills that are in market demand and match trainees to job opportunities.

Microfinancejobs, India: This project develops an online jobs platform to bridge the gap between 1,500 microfinance institutions in India and 10,000 professionals who would be willing to work in the microfinance field.

Mobile Telecenters, Philippines: Most public school students in Manila have limited or no access to computers and the Internet.Mobile Telecenters pro­vides onsite information- and-communications-technology (ICT) skills train­ing and career opportunities to over 6,000 students by using ICT tools adapted to a tricycle.

Open Dream, Thailand: The project provides low-cost web and application development services to social groups and organizations by leveraging the net­work of social software developers for project collaboration.

For more information :

www.ysei.org

2.3.1 REGIONAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL AND SUPRANATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WITH GRANT-MAKING OR OPERATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE’S INITIATIVES

There are two main institutional actors working in support of young people and providing financial support for the European youth sector.These are the Council of Europe and the European Union.Other institutions, such as the OSCE and UNDP have smaller, usually operational, programs of support, but only exceptionally engage in grant-making.

 

THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE (COE)

The CoE wants to encourage young people to get actively involved in strength­ening civil society in Europe; to defend the values of human rights, cultural diversity, and social cohesion; and to promote and develop youth policies.Its work in the field of youth involves all members of the European Cultural Con­

vention, 48 countries in 2009.That year the CoE had approximately 2,238 staff members in five operational centers: Strasbourg (headquarters), Brussels, Bu­dapest, Graz, and Lisbon.The CoE’s operational programs for youth are imple­mented by the Directorate of Youth and Sport.The CoE’s grant-making in the field of youth is organized through its mai funding mechanism called the Eu­ropean Youth Foundation.The following are departments or functional units of the CoE with some form of responsibility for youth:

  • Directorate of Youth and Sport (DYS)

The DYS supports the development of youth associations, networks, and initiatives, and promotes international cooperation in the youth field.It operates on a system of co-management that involves representatives from the International Non-Governmental Youth Organizations cooperating with government officials to work out the priorities for the youth sector.The DYS organizes the Conferences of European Ministers responsible for youth.The DYS’s priorities are human rights education and intercultural dialogue, youth participation and democratic citizenship, social cohesion and inclusion of young people, and youth policy development.These pri­orities are pursued through various activities, including training courses, study sessions, intercultural language courses, seminars, expert meetings and research, publications, and advice on youth policy development.

 

For more information visit:

www.coe.int/youth

www.coe.int

  • European Youth Centers (EYCs), Budapest and Strasbourg

The EYCs in Strasbourg and Budapest are permanent structures for the implementation of the CoE’s youth policy.They are international training and meeting centers with residential facilities, hosting most of the youth

sector’s activities.They provide a flexible and modern working environ­ment for international activities, with meeting rooms equipped for simul­taneous translation, information centers, and audio-visual and computer facilities.The EYC Strasbourg was founded in 1972 with financial support from the Norwegian government.It hosts the European Youth Foundation.The EYC Budapest was set up and inaugurated in 1995 as the CoE’s first permanent service in a Central and East European country.Its premises were placed at the disposal of the CoE by the Republic of Hungary.The EYCs run an annual program of up to 50 activities in close cooperation with nongovernmental youth organizations.The program of activities is co-decided upon in a system of decision making called co-management, which involves equal numbers of youth organizations and governments.The co-management system also decides on the thematic priorities, which the program addresses through its centralized activities.Both EYCs earn part of their operational income from so-called self-financed activities.These are activities that pay for the use of the facilities, but must be or­ganized by institutions or organizations that subscribe through their ac­tivities to the broad mission of the CoE and to its values.The proportion of self-financing is extensive—up to one-third of income.In 2009, the to­tal expenditure on the operation of both EYCs, including their programs within the annual budget, was €3,649,000, of which €2,906,500 is the con­tribution from the CoE annual budget.

For more information contact:

Budapest: www.eycb.coe.int

Strasbourg: www.coe.int/t/dg4/youth/EYC/Strasbourg_en.asp

https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?Ref=CM/Res(2008)25&Language=lanEnglish&Ver=original&Site=CM&BackColorInternet=9999CC&BackColorIntranet=FFBB55&BackColorLogged=FFAC75.

The Solidarity Fund for Youth Mobility (SFYM)

The CoE and the International Union of Railways (UIC) joined forces in 1994 to set up SFYM, which supports the mobility of disadvantaged young people.For every InterRail Card sold, €1 is donated by the UIC to fund projects involving Europe’s least advantaged young people.The fund pro­vides financial support to cover the rail travel costs of young people from underprivileged backgrounds or economically underdeveloped areas so that they can take part in international educational activities.To qualify for assistance, projects must involve at least two countries and a minimum of ten people.

MODUS OPERANDI: Applications to both the European Youth Foundation and the SFYM are managed centrally from the offices of the EYF at the European Youth Center in Stras­bourg.For the EYF, there are two deadlines per year for activities taking place in the first and second halves of the following year.For the Solidarity Fund, appli­cations can be made on a rolling basis, either before or after the activity has taken place.Applications can be made and tracked online.EYF staff provides, to the extent possible, consultancy and advice to applicants and, for the purposes of monitoring and evaluation, project visits are occasionally conducted.

Operational Programs for Youth: In addition, the CoE has several impor­tant operational programs supporting young people, youth organizations, and the development of the youth sector, focusing on non-formal educa­tion and training, and working through youth organizations and multipli­ers (voluntary youth leaders, youth workers, etc.) to reach a large number of young people.These programs are organized centrally, using in-house educational staff and the institution’s own residential centers, called Euro­pean Youth Centers.

For more information:

www.eyf.coe,int/fsmj

 

THE EUROPEAN UNION (EU)

The EU’s youth policies aim to meet young people’s changing expectations while encouraging them to contribute to society.The EU framework for youth policy is now composed of three main courses of action: encouraging young people’s active citizenship, promoting social and occupational integration of young people, and including a youth dimension in other policies.In addition, the EU also contributes to the development of youth mobility and the recog­nition of their non-formal learning experiences.Beyond its operational pro­gram, the EU has a single integrated grant-making program for funding youth activity, inside the EU, across the wider Europe and further afield: the Youth in Action (YiA) program.

For more information:

http://europa.eu/youth/index.cfm?Ll_id=en

 

  • The Youth in Action Program (YiA)

YiA is the EU program for young people ages 15 to 28 (in some cases 13 to 30).It was adopted in 2006 by the European Parliament and the Council under Decision No.1719/2006/EC.YiA aims to inspire a sense of active citizenship, solidarity, and tolerance among young Europeans and to in­volve them in shaping the EU’s future.It promotes mobility within and beyond EU borders and non-formal learning and intercultural dialogue.It also encourages the inclusion of all young people, regardless of their educa­tional, social, and cultural background; and aims to respond to the evolu­tion and needs of young people in Europe.

For more information:

      http://ec.europa.eu/youth/youth-in-action-programme/doc74_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/youth/sharing-experience/experience1291_en.htm.

http://ec.europa.eu/youth/sharing-experience/all_experiences_en.htm.

http://ec.europa.eu/youth/youth/contacts_en.htm?cs_mid=152

www.salto-youth.net/about/

http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/youth/index_en.php

 

 

2.3.2 FURTHER EU FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE YOUTH SECTOR

In addition to YiA, the EU has several other funding programs of relevance to the European youth sector, which can be used by youth organizations or other structures interested in youth or young people to finance their initiatives.These are:

ERASMUS FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS

Erasmus for Young Entrepreneurs is a pilot project initiated by the EU.It helps new entrepreneurs acquire relevant skills for managing small or midsize enter­prises (SMEs) by spending time in a business in another EU country.It con­tributes to improving the entrepreneur’s know-how and fosters cross-border 150 Section 2: Mapping Youth Funding in Different Regions of the World

transfers of knowledge and experience among entrepreneurs.The program seeks to:

  • facilitate on-the-job-training for new entrepreneurs in SMEs elsewhere in the EU in order to facilitate a successful start and development of their busi­ness ideas;
  • exchange experience and information among entrepreneurs on obstacles and challenges to starting up and developing their businesses;
  • enhance market access and identification of potential partners for new and established businesses in other EU countries;
  • encourage networking among entrepreneurs by building on knowledge and experience from other European countries.

Erasmus for Young Entrepreneurs provides practical and financial assistance for new entrepreneurs spending time in the business of experienced host en­trepreneurs in other EU countries.New entrepreneurs travel to an experienced entrepreneur in another EU country and work with him or her for one to six months.Matching new entrepreneurs with host entrepreneurs is carried out with the help of the intermediary organizations.

This program is financed by the European Commission and operates across 21 EU countries with the help of more than 100 intermediary organizations competent in business support (e.g., Chambers of Commerce, startup centers, incubators, etc.).Their activities are coordinated at European level by EURO­CHAMBRES, the Association of European Chambers of Commerce and In­dustry, which acts as a support office.

The stay abroad must be completed within 12 months and should total between one month and six months.Within this time span the stay may be divided into a number of shorter time slots (minimum one week per slot), which the new entrepreneur spends at the host entrepreneur’s business.Activities of the new entrepreneur during the stay abroad may include shadowing a senior host en­trepreneur; market research and developing new business opportunities; proj­ect development, innovation, and R&D; taking a fresh look at existing business operations; understanding SME finance; branding, sales, and marketing of the host entrepreneur’s company; and working on concrete projects from one or more of the above-mentioned areas.

In addition to the above, which is specifically targeted at young people, the EU’s Culture, Citizenship, Lifelong Learning, Media, PROGRESS, and Com­petitiveness and Innovation programs, as well as its European Structural Funds can be used by different intermediary organizations and structures in the youth sector to finance their initiatives.These funds are more complicated to access than those for Youth in Action, which is specifically conceived for use by young people and their organizations and informal associations and therefore has simplified application procedures.Nevertheless, for those professional ac­tors, their organizations, and other structures such as universities, think tanks, and professional associations within the youth sector, as well as specialized ministries in member states, these funds can provide support for large-scale, medium- to long-term initiatives with larger budgets and more ambitious ob­jectives to improve the sector’s functioning and professionalism.

For more information:

http://ec.europa.eu/culture/our-programmes-and-actions/doc411_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/citizenship/index_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-programme/doc78_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/media/index_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=327&langId=en

http://ec.europa.eu/cip/index_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docoffic/official/regulation/newregl0713_en.htm

www.erasmus-entrepreneurs.eu/page.php?cid=02

 

NORDIC COUNCIL: NORDIC CHILDREN’S AND YOUTH COMMITTEE (NORDBUK)

NORDBUK, part of the Nordic Council, has two kinds of grants, one for proj­ects and one for organizations, for supporting young people and their activi­ties in the region.In 2008, funding available for NORDBUK operations was €187,000 for organization and network support and some €368,000 for project support.

For more information:

www.norden.ee/en/grants/children-and-youth.html

http://docs.google.com/gview?a=v&q=cache:0xpHqusxfsIJ:www.coe.int/t/dg4/youth/Source/Resources/Forum21/Issue_No11/N11_YP_Nordic_council_en.pdf+budget+nordic+council+youth&hl=en.

  • Project Funding

The aim of project funding grants is to strengthen Nordic identity by sup­porting children’s and youth participation in activities regarding cultural, political, and social affairs in the North, and to enhance the possibility for children and youth to strengthen the Nordic profile in international rela­tions.Grants are given to time-limited projects that contribute to increas­ing contact between children and youth in the North.Grants can be given to organizations and other groups of children and young people (e.g., youth schools, youth clubs, cooperation between friendship municipalities, folk high schools) to organize seminars, courses, conferences, camps, publi­cations, and other events.This grant gives priority to participants up to age 25, although young people up to age 29 are considered as long as they have the primary initiative and responsibility throughout the process from idea development to final evaluation.Priority is given to projects involv­ing disabled children and youth and to those involving minority groups.153 2.3 Europe

Competitions and championships are given low priority.Eligible organiza­tions have shared statutes and members in at least three Nordic countries or autonomous regions: Denmark, Greenland, Finland, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and the Åland Islands.Project organizers must provide co-financing through participation fees or other grants.Grants can be given to cover travel, board and lodging, rental fees for venues, fees for speakers and other experts, assistance for participants with disabilities, and publications.Grants are not given to cover procurement of office sup­plies or acquisition of premises.Applications for project grants are assessed quarterly.

For more information:

http://en.ciriusonline.dk/grants-and-scholarships/nordbuk-nordic-childrens-and-youth-committee/project-grant-guide

  • Organizational Funding

Children and youth organizations with members in at least three Nordic countries can apply for grants for the planning and development of their Nordic cooperation.Eligible activities include planning meetings, infor­mation materials, and the like.Projects are assessed once a year and have an October 1 deadline.Organizations must be grant-entitled as a national child or youth organization or a concept-based organization, have at least 50% of its members under the age of 25, and have a democratic organiza­tional structure.If the organization does not meet the first criterion and, therefore, applies for grants under the second, the statutes and a confirma­tion of the number of the organization’s members must be enclosed.Grants are not given to sports or professional organizations.

For more information:

http://en.ciriusonline.dk/grants-and-scholarships/nordbuk-nordic-childrens-and-youth-committee/organisation-grant-guide

 

ORGANIZATION FOR SECURITY AND CO-OPERATION IN EUROPE (OSCE)

The OSCE conducts a wide range of activities related to all three dimensions of security—human, political-military, and economic-environmental.The OSCE employs about 3,000 staff in 18 missions and field operations located in South­eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia.They work to facilitate political processes, prevent or settle conflicts, and promote civil soci­ety and the rule of law.The OSCE does not have a centralized youth program, but according to needs identified on the ground in countries where it is active, it has developed youth-specific programming.Many of the OSCE’s regional and local programs have a strong youth dimension, involving young people in all kinds of educational activities to promote civil society reconciliation and community and human development; youth democratic leadership; and hu­man rights, among others.Particularly in Southeastern Europe, the OSCE has promoted youth participation in its programs as both beneficiaries and drivers of change.Several OSCE missions in Southeast European countries have hired youth program managers.The OSCE missions in each participating state have their own youth related activities, and in some cases provide funding for differ­ent kinds of activities of young people in the country, including the operation of youth centers, the organization of discussion forums and training seminars, etc.No information was found in the public domain concerning the volume of resources being invested in young people’s activities centrally or through the field presence of the OSCE.

For more information:

www.osce.org

 

THE PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE AND THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION IN THE FIELD OF YOUTH

Since 1998, the (sections responsible for youth in the) Council of Europe and the European Commission have cooperated closely in the youth field.This 155 2.3 Europe

partnership has taken the form of consecutive agreements focusing in the first stage on “European Youth Worker and Youth Leader Training,” complemented in 2003 by two further covenants, one on “Euro-Mediterranean Youth Coop­eration” and another on “Youth Research.” As of 2005 both partners (CoE and EC) strengthened cooperation and established a single partnership agreement with the aim of providing a lasting framework for the joint development of a coherent strategy in the field of youth worker training, youth policy, and youth research in Europe.The partnership has activities in the areas of youth research, youth policy development, and Euro–Med youth cooperation with the aim of providing added value to the programs of the two institutions and their institutional partners, fostering cooperation, complementarity and syn­ergies, and enhancing the partnership’s impact on youth-related policies and activities in Europe and beyond.The partnership does not have a grant-mak­ing mechanism.It has ten members of staff, but a relatively limited operational budget considering the scope of the program (figures not available in the pub­lic domain).It nevertheless provides important complementary support to the development of the European youth sector and its professionalization through its operational training, research, and policy activities.

For more information:

www.youth-partnership.net/youth-partnership/index.html

 

2.3.4.1 YOUTH-SPECIFIC FUNDERS AND GRANT-MAKING PROGRAMS

BALKAN CHILDREN AND YOUTH FOUNDATION (BCYF)

The BCYF is dedicated to improving the conditions, prospects, and quality of life of children and youth up to age 30 throughout the Balkan region.It aims to increase the effectiveness, scale, and sustainability of youth programs; to strengthen the capacity of children and youth NGOs, local and national, dealing with youth and youth business initiatives; to generate social invest­ments from the business sector, governments, international funding agencies, and NGOs; and to enhance cooperation among the business, government, and civil society sectors to improve the conditions and prospects of young people.It promotes positive youth development throughout the region by building al­liances at the local, national, regional, and international levels.Its core activi­ties are to enhance young people’s opportunities in the areas of employment, technology, non-formal education, health promotion and prevention, and de­mocracy building.While BCYF seeks to address the urgent realities of a region recovering from decades of ethnic strife, economic isolation, and social insta­bility, its focus has been to develop long-term, sustainable solutions.BCYF has sought to strengthen youth-serving NGOs in the Balkans identify and support best practices, convene individuals and organizations to develop a common vision among the region’s youth, and forge multisector partnerships to further these goals.

Youth Employability Program

This program seeks to support business plans of young unemployed per­sons ages 18 to 26 in Serbia who have an idea for setting up their own business with up to a total amount of €4,000.BCYF is ready to support individuals for a period of one year.The aim of the action is to improve access opportunities for young people into the local business community.

Youth Social Entrepreneurship Program

The Youth Social Entrepreneurship Program has increased the knowledge, skills, and resources of 5,400 young leaders or participants in youth-led programs.Since 2002, the program has worked to build the capacities, skills, and attitudes of Balkan’s youth leaders through leadership training, IT, and English-language training and youth exchange.

For more information:

www.balkanyouth.org

ERSTE FOUNDATION

Since commencing work in 2005, the ERSTE Foundation has been develop­ing projects independently and in collaboration with partners within three program areas: social affairs, culture, and Europe in Austria and Central and Southeastern Europe.The ERSTE Foundation works on an operational level to create new perspectives, engaging in dialogue to enable increased partici­pation of individuals in partnerships and with an attitude of respect for the people whose experiences, knowledge, and initiatives it promotes and encour­ages, across borders.Focusing on the European unification process, it aims to strengthen the region of Central and Southeastern Europe.Several of the me­dium-term operational projects funded by ERSTE Foundation in these areas are youth-led or youth-targeted, especially their actions supporting coopera­tion and partnership between schools in different countries.In addition, the ERSTE Foundation has a general funding structure for practical actions that can meet the challenges facing Central and Southeastern Europe.The program supports NGOs or nonprofit organizations in the countries where the foun­dation is active, but does not accept applications from individuals, political parties, or their affiliates.Project proposals, in the form of “project ideas” are received and assessed on an ongoing basis.

For more information:

www.erstestiftung.org

www.efc.be/webready/ERST002.html.

 

EUROPEAN CULTURAL FOUNDATION (ECF)

ECF is an independent not-for-profit organization that promotes cultural co­operation in Europe and funds projects that have a strong cultural component, including those run by young people and youth organizations.

Grant-Making: The ECF offers funding possibilities for individuals and for cultural organizations, as follows:

Artistic Project Grants for Cultural Organizations and Individual Artists

Artistic Project Grants supports outstanding artistic projects by individual art­ists or cultural organizations that show vision in illuminating the issues of di­versity in Europe.Artistic uniqueness and European relevance of projects are 160 Section 2: Mapping Youth Funding in Different Regions of the World

vital.The average grant award ranges from €30,000 to 60,000.The first call for applications was published in September 2008 and received more than 1,000 applications.Thirteen projects received a grant.The current round of applica­tions was closed in July 2009 and selection was finalized in November 2009.

Balkan Incentive Fund for Culture

In 2006, ECF introduced an extra funding line for Balkan projects in collabora­tion with Hivos and OSI.This funding line is interwoven with the above grant-making program, which means there is no separate application process, but project applications received from the Balkans receive priority.

“Making Collaboration Work” Grants for Cultural Organizations

“Making Collaboration Work” grants stimulate collaboration between cultural organizations in projects that add value to the practice of cultural cooperation in Europe and are designed for cultural organizations.The maximum grant award is €30,000.The 2009 selection was made between March and May of that year.The ECF received 642 applications, from which 40 projects were awarded grants.

For more information:

www.eurocult.org

GERMAN MARSHALL FUND (GMF)–REGIONAL TRUSTS

The GMF of the U.S.is a nonpartisan American public policy and grant-mak­ing institution dedicated to promoting greater cooperation and understanding between North America and Europe.GMF does this by supporting individuals and institutions working on transatlantic issues, by convening leaders to dis­cuss the most pressing transatlantic themes, and by examining ways in which transatlantic cooperation can address a variety of global policy challenges.In addition, GMF supports a number of initiatives to strengthen democracies.Founded in 1972 through a gift from Germany as a permanent memorial to Marshall Plan assistance, GMF maintains a strong presence on both sides of the Atlantic.In addition to its headquarters in Washington, D.C., GMF has seven offices in Europe: Berlin, Bratislava, Paris, Brussels, Belgrade, Ankara, and Bucharest.

GMF Grant-Making through the Balkan Trust for Democracy

From 2003 to 2009, the Balkan Trust for Democracy made 661 grants total­ing US$18,204,047.In 2009, the Balkan Trust approved 124 projects for a total of US$3,343,232, of which approximately 20 were proposed by youth organizations, were youth-led, or had young people as their main target group.Average grants in 2009 were US$26,500.

GMF Grant-Making through the Black Sea Trust for Democracy

Between 2007 and July 2009, 226 grants disbursed US$2,813,681.Approxi­mately one-fifth of applications that are pre-selected for review and grant­ing are from youth organizations or for youth projects in the Black Sea region.

For more information:

www.gmfus.org

www.efc.be/webready/MARS001.html

www.gmfus.org/balkantrust

www.gmfus.org/blacksea

 

GERMAN POLITICAL PARTY FOUNDATIONS

Each of the German political parties runs a foundation.These foundations are inspired by the political ideals of the party but do not promote political parti­sanship.All the German party foundations consider young people important stakeholders in their work and important actors of social change with whom partnership is necessary to achieve their goals.Each has youth-related pro­gramming and some opportunities exist for young people to receive funding for their activities.This work can have a considerable international dimension (within and beyond Europe).The German political party foundations all re­ceive the majority of their funding from public funds in Germany.

Friedrich Ebert Foundation (Social Democrats)

www.fes.de/themen/jugend

The FES runs several scholarship grant-making programs and operational programs to increase the civic and political participation of young people in Germany and internationally.

€117,000,000
Friedrich Naumann Foundation (Liberal Democrats)

www.fnst.org

The Friedrich Naumann Foundation has several operational programs aiming at increasing the civic and political participation of young people around the world.

€40,163,000
Hanns Seidel Foundation (Christian Democrats—CSU)

www.hss.de

The Hanns Seidel Foundation conducts political education with a Christian ethos, and occasionally organizes activities in the development of youth policy in Germany.

€44,909,000
Heinrich Boell Foundation (Greens)

www.boell.de

The Boell Foundation has several grant-making and operational programs for young people including support for talented individual young people, training for young journalists, support for young artists and writers, and activities and financing for volunteering.These programs are active in Germany and globally.

€39,374
Konrad Adenauer Foundation (Christian Democrats—CDU)

www.kas.de

The Konrad Adenauer Foundation conducts political and civic education with a Christian democratic ethos in Germany, but many of its youth activities are based on the principles of international exchange and involve young people from other countries.It also offers scholarships to German students to study abroad and foreign students to study in Germany.Journalism and post-graduate students can also access scholarship funding.

€105,002
Rosa Luxemburg Foundation (Democratic Socialists—Left Party)

www.rosalux.de/cms/index.php?id=engl

The Rosa Luxembourg Foundation conducts political education with the aim of engaging young people in democratic politics.

€13,470

ROBERT BOSCH FOUNDATION

The Robert Bosch Foundation has spent €900 million on funding socially use­ful projects.It receives its funding from contributions from the Bosch compa­ny, which the foundation owns.The Robert Bosch Foundation acts as both an operating and a grant-making foundation.The majority of funding is allocated to the foundation’s own projects, which accounted for 67% of projects support­ed in 2008.In 2008, its budget amounted to €60.1 million; 28% of third-party funding went to groups and associations under which youth-related funding is most likely to appear, i.e., to third parties in the not-for-profit and civic sectors.Its program focuses on several issues relevant to youth, including health and humanitarian aid, international relations, Central and Eastern Europe, educa­tion and society, and society and culture.In addition, within several of its work areas, the Bosch Stiftung has “in foundation” projects focusing on youth in Germany and other countries and regions:

  • Freiwilligenkolleg—Advanced Training Program for Young Volunteers

The project, Young People and Voluntary Services: The College, which the foundation launched in 2004 in cooperation with the Förderverein für Ju­gend und Sozialarbeit in Berlin, supports 20 young adults every year who have displayed special skills and extraordinary commitment in their vol­untary work.The college focuses on teaching practical skills that prepare young people for assuming responsibility in their working lives and in their continuing civic commitment.

  • Integration of Young Migrants (Germany)

Almost one-third of all children and youth in Germany are children of im­migrant families.Many of them experience greater difficulties than their peers in developing their talents.They need special support, encourage­ment, and a community that can deal with cultural and social diversity 165 2.3 Europe

for the benefit of all.To this end, the foundation instituted Integration of Young Migrants (Integration junger Migranten), a program that supports promising project ideas for integrating these young people in kindergar­tens, schools, and leisure activities.Since fall 2007, Stiftung Mitarbeit has administered this program.

  • Youth and Culture

The aim of the program, Youth and Culture, of the Robert Bosch Stiftung is to inspire sustained interest in culture among young people and com­municate the joy of reading and attending cabaret, theater, and museums to them.The program’s cultural activities and initiatives are designed to sensitize young people to aesthetic experience and foster their creativity.To do so, the foundation supports projects that arouse enthusiasm for culture among youth and encourage them to form durable relations with cultural institutions.Alongside promoting stronger engagement with galleries, mu­seums, cabaret theaters, and literature centers, the foundation promotes the involvement of young people with opera houses, orchestras, and theaters.

  • Quifd—Youth and Voluntary Work

The Robert Bosch Stiftung has supported voluntary services by young peo­ple, not only in Germany, but also in exchange programs with Central and Eastern Europe, since 1999.Support is provided for social and environ­mental projects, youth work, and initiatives in the education sector.The program culminated in the establishment of Quifd, an agency for quality in voluntary services.In cooperation with researchers and professionals, Quifd developed guidelines and standards for voluntary youth services.They help providers of voluntary services in their quest for better quality, while also serving as the basis for procedures to award quality certifica­tions.Quifd is an initiative of the Robert Bosch Stiftung together with the Förderverein für Jugend und Sozialarbeit e.V.in Berlin.

For more information;

www.bosch-stiftung.de

www.bosch-stiftung.de/content/language2/html/1542.asp

www.bosch-stiftung.de/content/language2/html/608.asp

 

ROCKEFELLER BROTHERS FUND (RBF)

The RBF tries to strengthen constituencies of citizens actively engaged in build­ing democracy through, among other strategies, the promotion of civic engage­ment among young people, including leadership development activities and ef­forts to insert fresh ideas into public life at all levels of society.Grants represent the core of RBF’s operations.

For more more information:

www.rbf.org/guidelines/guidelines_show.htm?cat_id=1662&doc_id=495551

www.rbf.org/grants/

www.rbf.org/grantsdatabase/grantsdatabase_list.htm?program=&goal=&from_month=1&from_year=2009&to_month=12&to_year=2009&keyword=youth&submit=Submit.

www.rbf.org/statisticalreviews/statisticalreviews.htm.

 

ROTARY AND LYONS CLUBS

While they originated in the U.S., the Rotary and Lyons clubs are widespread in Europe.In the aftermath of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 they have been active in supporting young people’s initiatives in Central and Eastern Europe.167 2.3 Europe

Rotary and Lions clubs are organized locally and, therefore, are known for funding local initiatives of young people.

www.rotary.org

www.lionsclubs.org

 

TRUST FOR CIVIL SOCIETY IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE (CEE TRUST)

The CEE Trust exists to support people and organizations in Central and East­ern European countries to take strategic steps with long-term benefits, toward three mutually reinforcing and intersecting objectives:

  • to create a supportive environment for civil society, which includes legal, fiscal and political environments favorable to a strong civic life;
  • to strengthen the nonprofit sector through capacity building, advocacy, in­trasector, and cross-sectoral cooperation and partnership;
  • to enhance the financial sustainability of nonprofit organizations by devel­oping public and private sources of support for the nonprofit sector and by supporting the operational and strategic development of nonprofit organi­zations.

CEE Trust has several programs of relevance to young people and youth orga­nizations:

In-Country Programs: The CEE Trust announces each year in October an open call for proposals that offer to civil society organizations the opportunity to address the critical issues in a creative and effective way.Unsolicited propos­als (out of the regular call) are accepted if they address a critical problem that demands urgent support.

Cross-Border Initiatives (ongoing): The Cross-border Initiative supports leading organizations working regionally and strategic regional initiatives of domestic NGOs in CEE.Eligible initiatives come from:

  • CEE regional NGO resources and infrastructure organizations;
  • CEE regional advocacy, watchdog, and public policy initiatives or networks;
  • CEE regional networking and information exchange initiatives or organiza­tions (context in which CEE civil society functions);
  • CEE regional cross-border grant makers;
  • CEE regional initiatives linking civil society actors with policymakers and public authorities (local, regional, national, and EU levels).

A maximum grant amount has been set for up to US$25,000.CEE Trust is flex­ible in regard to the size and duration of grants when an exception is justified.Supported initiatives would preferably include significant co-funding from other sources.

Fellowship Opportunities: The CEE Trust provides a limited number of in­dividual fellowships aimed at developing leadership capacities of NGOs and foundations in the region.Currently there are two fellowship opportunities:

  1. Individual grants for young leaders as well as senior managers and execu­tives under the International Fellowship Program (IFP) managed by the European Foundation Center on a competition basis within an open call for applications.Such persons are given the opportunity to work from three to 12 weeks in another organization throughout Europe to gain valuable insights and experiences.
  2. Individual support is available to individuals for participating in big civil society events, conferences, seminars, or workshops upon request.The indi­viduals should be invited as speakers, moderators, or active participants in discussions.The applicants must submit their motivation letter, the relevant agenda, and their request for funding to the CEE Trust at least one month prior to the event.

For more information:

www.ceetrust.org

www.efc.be/webready/TFCS001.html.

VISEGRAD FUND

The Visegrad Fund provides support for cooperation projects among the Visegrad countries (Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, and Hungary) in the form of small and midsize grants and fellowships for young leaders.

For more information:

www.visegrad.org

2.3.5 FUNDING FOR YOUTH RESEARCH

FRAMEWORK PROGRAM FOR RESEARCH OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION

In Europe, some public funding is available from the European Union and some other large-scale foundations for youth research through this source

For more information:

http://ec.europa.eu/research/fp7/index_en.cfm.

2.4.1 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WITH REGION-SPECIFIC PROGRAMS SUPPORTING YOUNG PEOPLE’S INITIATIVES

OFFICE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (OHCHR)—UN HUMAN RIGHTS LATIN AMERICA

With the mandate to promote and protect human rights, OHCHR concentrates its efforts on the fight against poverty, inequality, and discrimination through monitoring and direct action.OHCHR works to ensure that national institu­tions, laws, and programs comply with human rights standards, that govern­ments implement the recommendations of UN human rights mechanisms and bodies, and that steps are taken to allow groups that are marginalized or dis­criminated against to participate in public policy decision-making and moni­toring processes.While OHCHR does not have youth as a specific priority, in the Latin American context, it is working extensively on issues related to public safety and violence, and especially on organized crime, drug trafficking, and juvenile gangs, all of which are significant youth issues in the context.In 2008–9, OHCHR had a presence in ten countries of the region.

For more information contact:

www.ohchr.org/EN/Countries/LACRegion/Pages/LACRegionIndex.aspx

 

UNESCO LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN (LAC)

UNESCO in LAC operates through its cluster, regional, and country offices located in 11 countries.Its mission is to assist the Latin American and Carib­bean countries in the definition of relevant policy strategies in education.Its main goals are to increase the quality of education for all and promote lifelong learning; increase the awareness of scientific knowledge and policies related to science; address new ethical and social problems; promote cultural diversity, intercultural dialogue, and a culture of peace; and build knowledge societies.Among its many activities, it supports a youth information portal for the re­gion and one for professionals dealing with youth issues.

  • Youth Portal for Latin America and the Caribbean (CELAJU)

The Latin American and Caribbean Youth Portal is a joint initiative be­tween CELAJU and the UNESCO office for the Caribbean.This portal is for the general public, but especially for youth networks, organizations, and groups, as well as people working with youth in Latin America and the Caribbean.The website is an Internet meeting place, a network of networks of youth organizations and people working with youth, public and private, national and international, in all subject areas dealing with youth issues in Latin America and the Caribbean.The portal hopes to become recog­nized by professionals and leaders of youth networks and organizations.For them, it provides access to information in an open space concerning youth of today, tools for better use of information and communications

technologies (ICT) for youth empowerment, a distance education space, and a convenient suitable commercial place.

The portal’s services include:

  • thematic supplements on violence, health, ICT, citizenship, culture, ed­ucation, environment, volunteer action, work, and HIV/AIDS;
  • service of access to records centers and virtual libraries;
  • billboard of events by and about youth, by issues and countries;
  • access to tools to design and manage information through the Internet;
  • thematic forums, associated with leading activities in each selected theme area;
  • chat room and interactive dialogues, with thematic options;
  • e-groups and discussion lists, promoted by various networks and from the website;
  • technical and advisory support for networks and institutions special­izing in youth;
  • international distance courses and seminars (e-learning) with network and website animators about and for youth;
  • news bulletins with news, opportunities, and miscellaneous information;
  • Latin American e-magazine for youth research and studies.

For more informations:

http://portal.unesco.org/geography/en/ev.php-URL_ID=2316&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

www.youthlac.org

 

UNICEF REGIONAL OFFICE FOR LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

UNICEF activities in the region include policy advocacy and partnerships to protect and promote children’s rights, and to put children at the center of pub­lic policy, laws, and budgets.Its policy efforts focus mainly on applying the Convention on the Rights of the Child and providing support for the imple­mentation of Millennium Development Goals (MDG) in the areas of health, education, HIV/AIDS, protection, adolescents, and public policies.It also has 173 2.4 Latin America

some important operational programs on and for children and youth.These include:

  • UNICEF Juventud opina

UNICEF works with adolescents through its program Juventud opina, which focuses on providing information to young people as a means of supporting their participation.

  • UNICEF “What Young People Think” Survey: Latin America

“La Voz—The Voices of Children and Adolescents in Latin America and the Caribbean” presents the results of a regional survey conducted across 20 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.The poll was support­ed by UNICEF country offices in the region and the Spanish Committee for UNICEF.Representing the opinions of 103 million children, the mul­ticountry survey is the first initiative of its kind.The study took inspira­tion from Articles 12 and 13 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which state that every child has the right to participation and freedom of expression.

 

For more information:

www.unicef.org/lac/index.html

www.unicef.org/voy/Spanish

www.unicef.org/polls/tacro/index.html

 (UNV) LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Providing guidelines for international volunteering, UNV is gradually growing in importance in Latin America.Following the United Nations Development Programme—mainly MDG-related—agenda, UNV provides opportunities and support for those young people who would like to be active volunteers in

such areas as community development, gender, participation, and citizenship.It is expanding its program and outreach in LAC by developing relationships with civil society and local authority institutions.

For more information:

www.unv.org/en/what-we-do/countries/finland/doc/unv-showcases-latin-american.html

www.unv.org/en/news-resources/news/doc/unifem-and-unv-launch.html

 

WORLD BANK IN LATIN AMERICA

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/LACEXT/0,,menuPK:258559~pagePK:158889~piPK:146815~theSitePK:258554,00.html

The World Bank has successfully supported national youth policy develop­ment efforts in several countries through the Youth Voices conferences.In seven countries of the region, the World Bank is contributing to the develop­ment of national social and labor policies that are important to young people.A specific programming focus has been on youth at risk.The World Bank has one important grant-making program for young people in Latin America and the Caribbean, called the Development Marketplace.

Latin America and Caribbean Development Marketplace

www.lac-developmentmarketplace.org

Development Marketplace is a competitive grant program administered by the World Bank and supported by various partners that identifies and funds innovative, early-stage projects with high potential for development impact.Since its inception in 1998, Development Marketplace has awarded some US$40 million to more than 1,000 projects through global, regional, and country-level marketplaces.Using Development Marketplace funding as a launching pad, many projects go on to scale up or replicate elsewhere, and win prestigious awards for social entrepreneurship.

The 2010 Latin America and Caribbean Development Marketplace is fo­cused on “Youth Developing Opportunity: Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Sustainability.” Within this broad topic, three themes have been identified, and ideas are invited on:

  • the commercialization of locally produced biodiversity and agricultural products without degrading source habitats;
  • innovative approaches to income-generating opportunities for young people living in poor urban areas that are “hot spots” of crime and vio­lence;
  • social and economic initiatives that contribute to the well-being of vul­nerable groups.

THE EUROPEAN UNION AND LATIN AMERICA

The European Union and Latin America have enjoyed a strategic partnership since the first bi-regional summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1999.They cooperate closely at international level and maintain an intensive political dialogue at all levels—regional, subregional (Central America, Andean Community, and Mercosur), and increasingly at the bilateral level.

The 2007–13 thematic program, Investing in People, covers health, education, gender, and other aspects of human and social development, including youth and children, employment and social cohesion, decent work, and culture.The European Commission also promotes student mobility and tertiary education cooperation between Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean.

In programming, the European Commission acknowledges that complete in­volvement of civil society in the relations between the EU and Latin America is fundamental; from political dialogue through to the association agreements and the programming exercise for 2007–13, full participation allows transpar­ency and dissemination of the proper information.To further this objective, meetings are regularly organized to improve civil society involvement in the EU-LA relations

In the youth field, specifically, there are some opportunities for promoting youth mobility and organizing youth activities between Europe and Latin American and the Caribbean through the Youth in Action program.

Further informa­tion

http://ec.europa.eu/youth/youth-in-action-programme/doc74_en.htm.

http://ec.europa.eu/external_relations/la/civil_society_dialogue_en.htm.

http://ec.europa.eu/external_relations/la/index_en.htm

 ZACIÓN IBEROAMERICANA DE JUVENTUD] (OIJ)

The OIJ is an intergovernmental body that promotes dialogue and interna­tional cooperation in the field of youth among the Latin American countries, including Spain and Portugal (the former colonial powers).Its main achieve­ments include the Ibero-American Convention on the Rights of Young People, which is in the process of ratification by its member states.

For more information:

www.oij.org

INTER-AMERICAN CHILDREN’S INSTITUTE (IIN)

The IIN is a specialized structure of the Organization of American States (OAS).Established in 1927, IIN aims to contribute to the development of pub­lic policies that ensure the promotion and exercise of children’s rights within the framework of a strengthened democratic governance in the OAS member states.IIN accomplishes this aim by promoting cooperation with civil society and the creation of a culture based on children’s rights and well-being.IIN fo­cuses thematically on sexual exploitation, juvenile law, promotion and protec­tion of children’s rights, and international abduction of children.Across these areas, IIN engages in research and publications, maintains a library and spe­cialized networks, and offers distance education courses.One of these courses focuses on children and youth participation.

For more information:

www.iin.oea.org/IIN/english/index.shtml

 INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (IDB)

The IDB, established in 1959 to support the process of economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean, is the main source of mul­tilateral financing in the region.The IDB Group provides solutions to develop­ment challenges by partnering with governments, companies, and civil society organizations, and reaches its clients who range from central governments to city authorities and businesses.The IDB lends money and provides grants.In addition, it also offers research, advice, and technical assistance to support key areas such as education, poverty reduction, and agriculture.The bank is also active on cross-border issues including trade, infrastructure, and energy.

The Youth Development and Outreach Program of IDB Youth promotes the involvement of Latin American and Caribbean youth in the development pro­cess by providing young people with opportunities for leadership, community service, volunteerism, access to technology, and entrepreneurial development in the world of business and social action.

IDB Youth builds strategic alliances with governments, corporations, and NGOs to create a space where the role of youth in development can become more relevant.The program works to:

  • equip young people to participate in their own personal development as well as in that of their communities;
  • advocate to make youth development and involvement an integral part of the development process;
  • incorporate youth development and involvement into IDB operations;
  • promote inter-organizational and inter-sectoral alliances to foster youth de­velopment and involvement.

Key IDB Youth programs include:

A Ganar/A Vencer: IDB established a US$3.6 million program that uses soc­cer in youth work and development.As an incentive, the program attracts at-risk youth.As a teaching tool, it mixes field and classroom activities to teach six soccer-based and market-driven employability skills: teamwork, communica­tion, discipline, respect, a focus on results, and self-improvement.As a draw for private-sector support, the program demonstrates the economic power of soccer, and organizes events and sponsorship packages for private enterprises to secure needed investments and program sustainability.As a result, the Nike Foundation has pledged $1.8 million and Microsoft contributed $125,000.By the end of 2008, A Ganar/A Vencer had trained over 3,200 youth in Rio de Janeiro, Quito, and Montevideo.

Agents of Change: IDB and MTV Latin America established a partnership in October 2006 to invite young people to share their development projects by submitting a story to an online portal at www.mtvagentesdecambio.com.179 2.4 Latin America

More than 7,000 stories were received in a wide range of topics: from envi­ronmental protection, training, micro-enterprise, health, and housing, to art and culture and others.More than 600 were uploaded to the website to be disseminated and evaluated.From those, 25 were selected from seven differ­ent countries to be filmed and produced into three-minute segments in which youth and their projects were showcased.The stories were aired on MTV Latin America and local TV stations.

IDB Youth Network: This is a regional organization of networks comprised of thousands of youth leaders and organizations interested in the social and economic development of Latin America and the Caribbean.Network mem­bers are between 15 and 30 years old and are working or are volunteers for the socioeconomic development of their communities, their countries, and the region.Network members also include institutions working to benefit young people and foster their development.These institutional members are from the public, private, and nongovernmental sectors.

For more information:

www.iadb.org/exr/spe/youth/index.cfm?language=English

 

LATIN AMERICAN TECHNOLOGICAL INFORMATION NETWORK (RITLA)

RITLA is an international and intergovernmental organization designed to provide technical cooperation to Latin American countries who are members of the Latin American economic system.Its mission is to empower regional cooperation, consolidate mechanisms of collaboration and exchange linked to the use of new information and communication technologies, and discuss themes that are in its sphere of competence in the region and the world.Its official languages are Portuguese and Spanish.The executive headquarters is located in Brasilia, capital of the Federal Republic of Brazil.

Youth is one of the six priorities of RITLA, whose mission is to empower re­gional cooperation and exchange linked to the use of new information and communication technologies.Addressing the issues of the digital divide, infor­mation and communication technology, and innovation in education, as well as issues of participation, citizenship, and violence, RITLA is profiling itself as a key contributor to youth-related debates in the region.A number of youth-specific publications and resources are made available on its website.

For more information:

www.ritla.net

ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES (OAS)

The OAS is an international organization established in 1948 to achieve peace and justice among its member states, to promote their solidarity, to strengthen their collaboration, and to defend their sovereignty, their territorial integrity, and their independence.Today it comprises the 35 independent states of the Americas and constitutes the principal political, juridical, and social govern­mental forum in the region.The OAS uses a four-pronged approach.Each of the organization’s four main pillars—democracy, human rights, security, and development—supports the other.These pillars are connected through a structure that includes political dialogue, inclusiveness, cooperation, legal and follow-up instruments, and provides the OAS with the tools to effectively carry out and maximize the work it does in the region.

The OAS recently developed a new focus on youth—an integral and cross-cutting approach—to involve, engage, respond to, and empower young citizens across the region.It aims to view inter-American issues through the lens of youth in order to better focus the OAS efforts to promote equality, integral development, hemispheric security, and democratic governance.Special at­tention is given to engaging young people at the community and local levels, which can provide an effective platform for their contribution to democratic governance.Three core areas guide the OAS youth work:

  • promoting democratic values and practices;
  • promoting economic, social, and cultural development with equity; and
  • engaging youth at risk.

 For more information:

www.oas.org/youth

www.oas.org/youth

RED LATINOAMERICANA DE JUVENTUDES RURALES (RELAJUR)

www.relajur.org

RELAJUR is a youth network based in Uruguay targeting rural young people in the region.It collects information on and for rural young people and pro­vides a platform for sharing and exchanging information and services across the region.

YOUNG AMERICAS BUSINESS TRUST (YABT)

The YABT acts as a catalyst for young entrepreneur development in the Ameri­cas through business skills training, partnership, leadership, and technology.It is a young startup initiative and combines the energy of talented young people, as staff and representatives, with the experience and prestige of the OAS to sup­port young people’s entrepreneurship.

  • Business Labs: Ten business labs workshops were held in Paraguay, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, Mexico, Chile, Guatemala, Uruguay, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Jamaica in 2007.The program receives technical sup­port from the government of Israel valued at US$1 million for 2008–10, allowing it to expand the business labs structure to include leadership and personal skills, scientific entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility, and financial education.The business labs program operates at different lev­els in 33 of the 34 OAS member states.
  • Myybiz.net: YABT created Myybiz.net that hopes to evolve into a major Internet community of future entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship-related organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean.Members have free ac­cess to a wide variety of tools (from learning and communication tools to knowledge management applications) and services (e.g., hosting learning groups, entrepreneurship organizations, (inter)national web events, and much more).
  • Talent and Innovation Competition (TIC) of the Americas: TIC Ameri­cas is an international competition and entrepreneurial accelerator that pro­vides young entrepreneurs with the opportunity to see their business plan come to life, allows teams to compete with others from across the Ameri­cas, and offers opportunities for training, investment, and internships on a global scale.TIC Americas began with funding from Taiwan and is adapted from concepts of a successful model there.Now TIC Americas is drawing support from people, companies, and countries worldwide.

For more information:

www.myybiz.net

 INLATINA INICIATIVA LATINOAMERICANA

InLATINA is a nonprofit organization based in Uruguay aimed at develop­ing strategies for youth poverty reduction, community empowerment, and the strengthening of democracy.It is an open forum for initiatives of social inno­vation and citizen participation focusing on areas of social entrepreneurship, sexual and reproductive health, and cultural and environmental policies.

For more information:

www.inlatina.org (Spanish)

YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM FOR INNOVATION AND SOCIAL ACTION (YOUTH FUND)

The Youth Fund was established as an instrument to effectively respond to the needs of young people in the Latin American and Caribbean region and to promote their participation in the development process. The goal of the Youth Fund is to support innovative initiatives that strengthen the capacity of low-income youth in both rural and urban areas to increase their potential for em­ployment.

The Youth Fund provides technical and financial assistance for youth orga­nizations that are working to contribute to the development of young people between 15 to 30 years of Latin America and the Caribbean. It provides non-reimbursable financing ranging from US$25,000 to $40,000 per initiative.Pro­posals are expected to focus on enterprise and community development that incorporates human capacity building that enables young people to contribute to their personal development as well as that of their communities. Capacity-building programs might include (but are not limited to):

  • life skills (basic personal development, life planning, effective employment habits, conflict resolution, team work, among others);
  • youth leadership and community participation;
  • strengthening or establishing a social entrepreneurship (associations, foun­dations, activities of community service and volunteerism, for example);
  • capacity building on business creation and development, among others.

To date, the three rounds of grant-making have awarded 18 grants to projects from across Latin America.

For more information:

www.fondojuventud.org

fondodejuventud.org/youth2/awards.asp?tm=2&lm=13.

UNESCO YOUTH FOCAL POINTS IN ARAB STATES

http://portal.unesco.org/shs/en/ev.php-URL_ID=11127&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

UNESCO has nominated individual country focal points (coordinators) for its work on youth in the Arab States in an effort to increase effectiveness.

THE UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (UNDP): ARAB STATES

www.undp.org/arabstates/youth.shtml

Unlike in any of the other UNDP regions, youth appears as a thematic prior­ity on this regional portal.UNDP in the region organizes regional programs mainstreaming youth, a youth workshop series, and the promotion of youth at the country level.

LEAGUE OF ARAB STATES

www.arableagueonline.org/las/english/level1_en.jsp?level1_id=1

The League of Arab States (also known as the Arab League) is a voluntary as­sociation of independent countries whose population is mainly Arabic speak­ing.It seeks to strengthen ties among the member states, coordinate policies, and promote common interests.It was founded in 1945 with states joining progressively over time.Its membership now extends to 22 states.It is involved in political, economic, cultural, and social programs designed to promote the interests of member states.It has served as a forum for member states to co­ordinate their policy positions and deliberate on matters of common concern, settling some Arab disputes and limiting conflicts.It has played an important role in shaping school curricula, and preserving manuscripts and Arab cultural heritage.It also encourages measures against crime and drug abuse, and deals with labor issues (particularly among the emigrant Arab workforce) and with issues of intellectual property and information and communication technol­ogy promotion.

The League of Arab States emphasizes the role, strengthening, and empower­ment of Arab youth, and endorses young people as a principal factor in the de­velopment of the Arab region.For this purpose, a League of Arab States Youth Forum is held annually.The objectives of the forum are:

  • exchanging knowledge, successful stories, ideas, and suggestions concerned with the various dimensions of dialogue among social groups with different cultures;
  • crystallizing suggestions and mechanisms for enhancing the role of Arab and European youth in fostering intercultural dialogue within the Arab re­gion and activating Euro-Arab cultural dialogue.Also to support exchange, partnership, and joint actions between Arab and European youth leading to intercultural interaction and complementarily;
  • identifying youth ideas and suggestions to enhance the role of the League of Arab States and its organizations in holding a continuous and creative intercultural and inter-religious dialogue at the Arab, Mediterranean, and international levels;
  • proposing elements for a youth joint vision initiated from what is known as a “transnational cultural” approach one that enhances intercultural dialogue and complementarily values and ensures the sustainability of common in­ terests and values for all nations, and limits discrimination, prejudice, and the false conflict among civilizations.

The 2008 League of Arab States Youth Forum was devoted to the theme of “Youth and Intercultural Dialogue.” Detailed information on the program is available at www.lasyouthforum.org/en/index.php.

No information is available in the public domain concerning the League’s bud­get allocations for youth-related programming.

  • Arab League Educational, Cultural, and Scientific Organization (ALECSO)

www.alecso.org.tn

ALECSO is a specialized agency, with headquarters in Tunis.The organi­zation, which works within the Arab League, focuses on enhancing and coordinating educational and cultural activities in the Arab world.It was established in 1970.ALECSO is a resource center for the Arab world in matters of education, culture, sciences, and communication.

ALECSO’s work is guided by an action plan for the period 2005–10.The plan’s priorities include improving literacy in the Arab world, closing the technological and digital gap between the Arab countries and developed countries, enhancing educational systems using modern techniques in teaching and learning, coping with the negative effects of globalization on Arab societies, supporting dialogue between Arab culture and other cultures, developing scientific research, preserving historical heritage, and disseminating Arab culture to the international level.All of these priorities recognize young people as a key constituency and a key beneficiary, but no information is available in the public domain concerning the actual invest­ment made in young people by this agency of the Arab League.

EURO-MED YOUTH PROGRAM

www.euromedyouth.net/about-euromed-youth-iii-programme,023

The Euro-Med Youth Program is a regional program set up within the frame­work of the third chapter of the Barcelona Process titled “Partnership in Social, Cultural and Human Affairs.” It promotes the mobility of young people and understanding among peoples through three types of actions: youth exchang­es, voluntary services, and support measures.The current phase (III), launched in October 2005, focuses on mobility, non-formal education, and intercultural learning.Its geographical scope comprises 37 countries: the 27 EU member states and the ten Mediterranean partner countries, signatories of the Barce­lona Declaration.

The decentralized implementation of the program, through Euro-Med Youth Units in participating countries, is an innovation, with the aim of bringing action as closely as possible to the beneficiaries and adapting to the diversity of national systems and situations in the field of youth.Applicants and proj­ect leaders from the Mediterranean partner countries apply directly for grants to their own national youth authorities, which are now responsible for grant awarding and the overall management of the program.

Grants are awarded for the following activities:

Support measures also follow the 2+2 formula (young people from two EU member states and two Mediterranean partner countries).Projects include job-shadowing, contact-making seminars, study visits, and training courses.

Voluntary Service consists in an unpaid, full-time, and nonprofit-making transnational voluntary activity for the benefit of the community.It involves young people from at least one EU member state and one Mediterranean part­ner country.

Youth Exchange projects bring together young people from at least four dif­ferent countries (two EU member states and two Mediterranean partner coun­tries), providing them with an opportunity to discuss various themes and learn about each other’s country, culture, and language.

 ISLAMIC EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (ISESCO)

ISESCO was established at the Ninth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers (held in Dakar, Senegal, April 24–28, 1978) and is based in Riyad.Its programs focus on four interlinked areas relevant to young people: developing member states’ human resources in education, sciences, culture, and communication; highlighting the Islamic civilization’s active part in knowledge fields; redress­ing the image of Islam and Muslims in the West; and affording the member states access to the information and knowledge society.UNESCO’s partner in the region, ISESCO annually awards prizes for excellence in the areas of educa­tion, sciences, and culture and communication.

For more information:

 www.isesco.org.ma/english/prizes/prizes.php?page=/Home/ISESCO%20Prizes.

www.isesco.org

SALTO EURO-MED RESOURCE CENTER

SALTO-YOUTH stands for Support, Advanced Learning and Training Oppor­tunities within the Youth in Action program.It is a network of eight resource centers that focus on European priority areas within the youth field.It provides youth work and training resources, and organizes training and contact-mak­ing activities to support organizations and national agencies within the frame of the European Commission’s Youth in Action (YiA) program and beyond.SALTO-YOUTH, started in 2000, is part of the European Commission’s Train­ing Strategy within the Youth in Action program and works in synergy with other partners in the field.One of the eight centers is the SALTO Euro-Med Resource Center that supports cooperation between European and Mediter­ranean countries.Its main activities include:

Dissemination of good practices: The center compiles and disseminates edu­cational good practices in training and youth work to create a common mem­

ory.It coordinates an online toolbox offering users access to different training tools and documents, collects educational training course reports, publishes the Meet in Euro-Med magazine biannually, and organizes a tool fair every year to give youth actors the chance to share their good practices and increase their knowledge of newly developed educational tools.

Partnerships: The center works in close partnership with several European and Mediterranean institutions, including the Council of Europe’s European Youth Centers, the European Commission and Council of Europe’s “Train­ing for European Youth Activity Leaders,” and the European Commission and Council of Europe’s “Euro-Med Cooperation in Training.”

Support to networks: The center supports the network of national agencies, Euro-Med youth units, and multipliers of the YiA program with information about educational good practices in youth work, newsletters, and magazines.

Training opportunities and events: The center works with national agencies to propose innovative thematic training courses on Euro-Med Youth priori­ties.These include the fight against racism, the place of women in society, and minority rights, and allow participants to integrate these priorities into their own projects.

For more information:

www.salto-youth.net/euromed

AMERICA-MIDEAST EDUCATIONAL AND TRAINING SERVICES, INC. (AMIDEAST)

AMIDEAST is a private, nonprofit organization that strengthens mutual un­derstanding and cooperation between Americans and the people of the Middle East and North Africa.Every year, AMIDEAST provides English language and professional skills training, educational advising, and testing services to

hudreds of thousands of students and professionals in the Middle East and North Africa; supports numerous institutional development projects in the region; and administers educational exchange programs.Founded in 1951, AMID­EAST is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with a network of field offices in Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank/Gaza, and Yemen.In 2008, AMIDEAST spent US$62.8 million on programs.

Educational advising and information services: AMIDEAST’s advising and educational information centers throughout the Middle East and North Africa provide access to resources on U.S.study, information on the U.S.college and university application process, and support services for all those considering U.S.educational opportunities.

English language training: AMIDEAST offers English language training in locations throughout the Middle East and North Africa.Classes are taught by professionally trained teachers using communicative teaching methods.Stu­dents learn practical everyday English that they can use in real-life situations such as at work or school.AMIDEAST’s small classes, customized instruction, and comprehensive learning resources help students improve their English language skills quickly and effectively.Central to AMIDEAST’s approach to language teaching and teacher training is the integration of critical thinking and technology skills inside and outside the classroom.

Institutional development: AMIDEAST partners with NGOs, government agencies, and international development donors to design and implement insti­tutional development programs throughout the Middle East and North Africa.

Professional training: AMIDEAST provides comprehensive training for busi­ness professionals, students, and executives in the Middle East and North Af­rica.Our professional training and development programs provide individuals with the skills they need to succeed in today’s global marketplace.Our training is relevant, targeted, and designed to develop competency in a range of ba­sic business skills and advanced management techniques.AMIDEAST

Creates and maintains links between organizations in the U.S.and those in the Arab world; these links give clients access to a range of professional opportunities and American business resources.

Scholarship and exchange program administration: These programs con­tribute to individual success and provide a forum for positive cross-cultural interaction.In the long term, they hold the potential to improve economic development, cross-cultural understanding, and even foreign policy.

For more information:

www.amideast.org

ANNA LINDH FOUNDATION

www.euromedalex.org

The Anna Lindh Foundation is an organization shared and resourced by over 40 Euro-Mediterranean countries to bring people together as a way to promote dialogue between cultures and respect for diversity.To fulfill this objective, the foundation leads regional initiatives in the Euro-Med space and supports local activities carried out by organizations based across civil society that advocate for better understanding among people, religions, and beliefs, and champion human rights and democracy.The foundation is a central member of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership, and a facilitator of the participation of civil society in the Union for the Mediterranean.It works also as a center for information and dissemination of this initiative, and as an observatory of intercultural dia­logue in the region.The foundation coordinates a Euro-Mediterranean net­work that gathers hundreds of social and institutional bodies that share the values of the foundation and work to make dialogue, peace, and prosperity possible in the region.

  • Anna Lindh Grant-Making

One way in which the Anna Lindh Foundation fulfills its mission is by providing grants to civil society organizations through an annual call for proposals to select the best initiatives for intercultural dialogue.The Anna Lindh Foundation works in six main program areas: ideas and ideologies; 192 Section 2: Mapping Youth Funding in Different Regions of the World

education; cultural protection, media; religion, spirituality, and values; and cities and diversity.The call is focused on thematic issues in line with each year’s priorities.Between 2006 and 2008, the foundation gave over 280 grants, financed activities and projects in over 30 countries, and mobilized over 2,000 partners and institutions in the region.

For more information:

www.euromedalex.org/case-studies.

THE KING ABDULLAH II AWARD FOR YOUTH INNOVATION AND ACHIEVEMENT (KAAYIA)

The KAAYIA invites young Arabs to showcase their success stories and the positive impact they have had on their communities.Through establishing micro-enterprises, promoting the peaceful resolution of conflicts, fostering intercultural dialogue, and creatively using technology to boost employment and educational opportunities, young leaders in the region are making a dif­ference and inspiring their peers to follow their lead.The KAAYIA, under the management of the King Abdullah II Fund for Development, seeks to reward these distinguished young leaders throughout the region by providing them with much needed support and recognition.The KAAYIA will enable these outstanding leaders to continue their good work, demonstrate what is possible to their peers, and in turn allow the concept of active citizenship to flourish and become an inherent part of the Arab youth culture.

KAAYIA invites young leaders who are currently leading development efforts in the Arab world that bring to life the notion of active citizenship.Applicants need to demonstrate significant contribution to the local community through their project; their project’s potential for increased impact; and how they could be role models for other young people.KAAYIA will provide each of the award winners with a US$50,000 grant, which will be allocated for two purposes: 193 2.5 Middle East and North Africa

The Project Grant: A portion of the US$50,000 will be provided as a two-year grant to support a specific venture or project defined by the awardees.These funds will support the scaling up of their project in the Arab region and help these existing successful initiatives to increase their impact.

Education and Training: A portion of this grant enables the award winners to pursue educational or training opportunities to meet their specific learning needs as young leaders and to increase the impact of their projects.These funds provide support to the award winners to pursue opportunities to enhance their skills and leadership abilities.

The King Abdullah II Fund for Development (KAFD) acknowledges and recognizes the winners and their work by celebrating and publicizing their achievements through the following activities:

For more information:

www.kaayia.org

MIDDLE EAST YOUTH INITIATIVE

The Middle East Youth Initiative was created to promote the economic and social inclusion of young people in the Middle East. It was launched by the Wolfensohn Center for Development at the Brookings Institution and the Dubai School of Government in July 2006.By creating an international alli­ance of academics, policymakers, youth leaders, and leading thinkers from the private sector and civil society, it aims to develop and promote a progressive

agenda of youth inclusion. The initiative attempts to bridge the divide between thinkers

and practitioners, and uses research as a foundation for effective poli­cy and programs. The initiative has three complementary pillars: research and policy, advocacy and networking, and practical action.

The initiative’s central theme, youth inclusion, is the provision of opportuni­ties that enable youth to fully participate in society and become adults. These opportunities include receiving quality education, decent employment, afford­able housing, and the power to shape their communities. In order to address these challenges, the Middle East Youth Initiative promotes youth inclusion through an integrated approach that cuts across five sectors: education, em­ployment, marriage, housing and credit, and civic participation.

For more information contact:

www.shababinclusion.org

SAID FOUNDATION

The Said Foundation aims, through its Karim Rida Said Fund, to bring positive and lasting change to the lives of children and young people in the Middle East.The foundation’s work is nonsectarian and nonpolitical.In 2007–8, the founda­tion disposed of a budget of US$4 million for programs.Its work is organized in three areas:

Further Education: This program contributes to the development of the Mid­dle East through the education of young people for whom such opportunities would not otherwise be available.Over the years, more than 500 young people have benefited from scholarships including archaeologists, environmentalists, geneticists, linguists, musicians, nurses, water engineers, and university profes­sors.

Child Development: The Child Development Program makes grants to ed­ucation, health, disability, and risk reduction projects implemented through partner organizations in Syria, Palestine, Jordan, and Lebanon.In Syria, the Damascus office oversees the implementation of several disability projects across the country.

Arab Culture: The foundation aims is to build a better understanding and ap­preciation of Arab culture in the UK.This program hopes to persuade adults and young people to break down barriers and build mutual respect.

For more information:

www.saidfoundation.org

 

SAVE THE CHILDREN SWEDEN—MIDDLE EAST REGION

Save the Children Sweden was established in 1919 as an independent rights-based NGO with no religious or political affiliations.It is focused on devel­oping child-friendly societies by supporting governments and civil society in actions that bring lasting improvements for children living under difficult cir­cumstances.Save the Children Sweden works with children to achieve change through participation on matters affecting them, and promotes the responsi­bilities and duties of parents, guardians, and authorities in improving the living conditions of children.

Save the Children Sweden has been working in the Middle East and North Africa region since 1963 and runs projects across the region through offices in Lebanon, Palestine, and Yemen.In cooperation with local partners, it provides quality education and protection for children under all settings, including emergencies, and works to strengthen the capacities of civil society organiza­tions that are advocate for child rights issues.

Programming in the Middle East and North Africa is organized in five main areas: education, protection, civil society for child rights, emergencies, and capacity building.

For more information:

www.scsmena.org.

OTHER DONOR ORGANIZATIONS WORLWIDE

AANGEPASTE TECHNOLOGIE ONTWIKKELINGS LANDEN-ATOL
Blijde Inkomststraat 9
Leuven B-3000, Belgium
Tel: 32-1-622-4517 Fax: 32-1-622-2256
Email: atol@atol.ngonet.be
Website: www.atol.ngonet.be

AARON DIAMOND AIDS RESEARCH FOUNDATION
375 Park Avenue, Suite 3303
New York, NY 10021
Tel: (212) 838 8525
Website: www.adarc.org

AARP ANDRUS FOUNDATION
601 E Street, NW
Washington, DC 20049, Obvious
Tel: (202) 434 6190
Website: www.andrus.org

AAUW EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION
C/o Customer Service Center
Dept 141, 2201 Dodge
St. Iowa City IA 52243-4030
United States of America
Tel: 1-319-337-1716
Email: intsymp@aauw.org
Website: www.aauw.org

ABBEY NATIONAL GROUP
PO Box 911, Milton Keynes
United Kingdom MK9 1AD
Tel: 44-870-608 0104
Email: communitypartnership@abbeynadonal.co.uk

ABBOTSFORD FOUNDATION
L04-32310 South Fraser Way
Abbotsford BC V2T 1X1, Canada
Tel: (604) 850-3755
Fax: (604) 850-2527
Email: abbvfoundation@uniserve.com

ACADEMY FOR EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
1825 Connecticut Avenue NW
Suite 900 Washington DC 20009-5721
United States of America
Tel:1-202-884-8000
Fax: 1-202-884-8400
Email: admindc@aed.org , adminny@aed.org
Website: www.aed.org

A CALL TO SERVE INTERNATIONAL
1107 Providence Road
Columbia MO 65202, USA
Tel:1-573-449-3146
Fax: 1-573-874-5820
Email: tblairacts@aol.com

ACCESS TO CREDIT MEDIA PROJECT
P.O. Box 2007
Newburgh Associates
2007 Carmel Road North
Newburgh Maine 04444, USA
Tel:1-301-473-8797, 1-207-234-4112
Fax: 1-301-473-8695,1-207-234-4068
Email: newa@agate.net
Website: www.toourcredit.org

ACCION
60 Walton Street, Suite 400
Atlanta GA 30303
United States of America
Tel:1-404-521-0594
Fax: 1-404-521-0597
Email: atlantaloans@accionusa.org
Website: www.accionatlanta.org

ACCION
3245 West 26th St., Chicago IL 6062
United States of America
Tel:1-773-376-9004
Fax: 1-773-376-9048
Email: info@accionchicago.org
Website: www.accionchicago.org

ACCION
20 First Plaza NW, Suite 417
Albuquerque
New Mexico 87102
United States of America
Tel:1-505-243-8844
Fax: 1-505-243-1551
Email: accion@accionnm.org
Website: www.accionncwmexico.org

ACCION
109 N. San Saba
San Antonio TX 78207, USA
Tel:1-210-226-3664
Fax: 1-210-226-2258
Email: info@acciontexas.org
Website: www.acciontexas.org

ACCION CONTRA EL HAMBRE
Caracas 6-1
Madrid 28010
Spain
Tel: 34-91-391-5300
Fax: 34-91-391-5301
Email: ach@achesp.org

ACCION CONTRA EL HAMBR
Canuda 24, 1 C
Barcelona 08002
Spain
Tel: 34-93-301-7910
Fax: 34-93-301-7910
Email: achcat@achesp.org
Website: www.accioncontraelhambre.org

ACCION INTERNATIONAL
56 Roland Street, Suite 300
Boston MA 02129
United States of America
Tel: 1-617-625-7080
Fax: 1-617-625-7020
Email: info@accionusa.org , rratcliffe@accion.org , mbrand@his.com , acciondc@accion.org
Website: www.accion.org

ACCION VARAPAZ
C/ Canizares, 2 Bajo
Madrid 28012
Spain
Tel: 34-91-429-2978
Fax: 34-91-429-2978
Email: verapaz@wanadoo.es
Website: www.dominicos.org/verapaz

ACC NETWORK ON RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND FOOD SECURITY’
C/o FAO, Rural Development
Divison
Via delle Term di Caracalla
Rome 00100, Italy
Tel: 39-06-5225-1(main)
Fax: 39-06-5225-3152(main)
Email: rdfs-net@fao.org
Website: www.accnetwork.net

ACCORD (AFRICAN CENTER FOR THE CONSTRUCTIVE RESOLUTION OF DISPUTES)
Private Bag X018, Umhlanga Rocks
4320 South Africa
Tel: +27-31-502-3908
Mobile: +27-82-902-2936
Fax: +27-31-502-4160
Email: cedric@accord.org.za
Website: www.accord.org.za
Contact: Assistant Director

ACTIF ALLIER POUR UNE ECONOMIE SOLIDAIRE
62 cours Jean Jaures Moulnis 03000
France
Tel: 33-4-7020-8720
Fax: 33-4-7020-8721
Email: actif.allier@libertysurf.fr

ACTINVEST INTERNATIONAL
C.P. 2o47
14 Ch. du Hameau
Veyrier- 1255
Switzerland
Tel: 41-22-890-0091
Fax: 41-22-890-0092
Email: actinvst@iprolink.ch

ACTION AGAINST HUNGER
875 Ave of the Americas
Suite 1905, New York
United States 10001
Tel: 1-212-967-7800
Emergency Phone: 1(917) 287-1812
Email: isong@aahusa.org
Tel: +1-212-967-7800
Fax: +1-212-967-5480
Email: aah@aah-usa.org
Website: http://www.aah-usa.org
Contact: Secretary

ACTION AGAINST HUNGER UK
1 Catton Street
WCIR 4AB London
United Kingdom
Tel: +44-207-831-5858
Fax: +44-207-831-4259
Email: sn@acf.imaginet.fr
Website: http://www.aah-uk.org

ACTION AID, ASIA
13th Floor, Regent House Building
183, Rajdamri Road, Pathumwan
Bangkok
Thailand – 10220
Tel: 66-2-6519066-9
Fax: 66-2-6519070
Email: mail@actionaidasia.org

ACTION AID AUSTRALIA
PO Box 42
Narre Warren LPO, VIC 3805
159 Cranbourne Road
Narre Warren VIC
Australia
Tel: +61 (3) 9704 6315
Fax: +61 (3) 9704 6354
Contact: Lyn Pickering
Email: lipickering@bigpond.com
Website: http://www.actionaidaustralia.org.au

ACTION AID – ACTION IN DISTRESS
Hamlyn House, Mc Donald Road
Archway, London N19 5PG
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7561-7561, 44-20-7281-4101
Fax: 44-20-7272-0899, 44-20-7272-0899
Email: mail@actionaid.org.uk , hcoulby@actionaid.org.uk
Website: www.actionaid.org
Contact: Editor
Email: sross@actionaid.org.uk

ACTIONAID
Chataway House, Leach Road
Chord, Somerset
TA20 1FR
United Kingdom
Tel: +44-1460-62972
Fax: +44-1460-67191
Email: mail@actionaid.org.uk
Website: www.actionaid.org

ACTION BY CHURCHES TOGETHER (ACT)
ACT Secretariat, Ecumenical Center
150, route dc Ferney
P.O. Box 2100
1211 Geneva 2
Switzerland
Tel: + 41-22-791-60-33
Fax: + 41-22-791-65-06
Email: act@act-intl.org
Website: www.act-intl.org

ACTION BY CHURCHES TOGETHER
P.O. Box 456,
3500 AL Utrecht
The Netherlands
Tel: +31 30 880.1427
Fax: +31 30 880.1587
Email: Emergencies-refugees@kerkinactie.nl
j.van.schalm@kerkinactie.nl

ACTION BY CHURCHES TOGETHER-ACT INTERNATIONAL
C/o Church World Service
475 Riverside Drive (#606)
New York NY 10115
United States of America
Tel: 1-212-870-3151
Fax: 1-212-870-2236
Email: act@act-intl.org
Website: www.act-intl.org

CAAC OF PIKE COUNTY
941 Market Street
Piketon OH 45661
United States of America
Tel: 1-614-289-2371
Fax: 1-614-289-4291
Email: sbeyens@bright.net

CABO BLANCO
Lansmansbacken 7/Asberg
Sundbyberg 172 46, Sweder
Tel: 46-8-628-7195
Fax: 46-8-628-7195

CAFOD – CATHOLIC FUND FOR OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT (UK)
Romero Close, Stockwell Road
London SW 9TY
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7733 7900
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7274 9630
Email:
Website: www.caroa.org
Contact: Director

CAISSE SOCIALE DE DEVELOPPEMENT LOCAL
29, rue du Mirail
Bordeaux 33000
France
Tel: 33-5-5633-3797
Fax: 33-5-5633-3798

CALGARY FOUNDATION, THE
540 – 5th Avenue SW
Calgary AB T2P OM2
Canada
Tel: (403) 264-1662
Fax: (403) 265-0152
Email: info@thecalgaryfoundation.org
Website: www.thecalgaryfoundation.org

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION FOR MICROENTERPRISE OPPORTUNITY
655 13th Street, Suite 201
Oakland CA 94612
United States of America
Tel: 1-510-238-8360
Fax: 1-510-238-8361
Email: CAMEO@igc.org
Website: www.microbiz.org

CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION
1541 Wilshire Blvd # 407
Los Angeles CA 90017
United States of America
Tel: 1-213-353-1676
Fax: 1-213-207-2780
Website: www.cceda.com

CALIFORNIA WELLNESS
FOUNDATION, THE
6320 Canoga Ave., Suite 1700
Woodland Hills, CA 91367
USA
Website: www.tcwf.org/index.html

CALMEADOW
365 Bay Street, Suite 600
Toronto Ontario M5H 2VI
Canada
Tel: 1-416-362-9125
Fax: 1-416-362-0769
Email: administtation@calmeadow.com
resource@calmeadow.com
Website: www.calmeadow.com

CALVERT NEW WORLD FUND, INC.
103 West Main St.
Durham NC 27701
United States of America
Tel: 1-800-368-2745
Fax: 1-919-688-9095
Email: customerservice@calvei1group.com
Website: www.calvertgroup.com

CALVERT SOCIAL INVESTMENT FOUNDATION
4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 1000 N
Bethesda MD 20814
United States of America
Tel: 1-301-951-4895, 1-800-248-0337
Fax: 1-301-654-2960
Email: customerservice@calvert.com
customerservice@calvertgroup.com
foundation@calvertgroup.com
Website: www.calvertgroup.com

CAMBELLFORD/SEYMOVR COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
174 Oliver Road
P.O. Box 1146
Campbellford OX KOL -.L’
Canada
Tel: (705) 653-2005
Email: cscfoundation@redden.on.ca

CAMBRIDGE & NORTH DUMFRIES COMMUNTIT FOUNDATION
24 Queens Square-
Cambridge OX \ I S ‘- H .
Canada
Tel: (519) 624-&9-2
Fax: (519) 624-4~32
Email: foundadon@in.ooLca

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY
The Edinburgh Building
Shaftsbury Road, Cambridge CB2 2RU
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-1223-31-2393
Fax: 44-1223-31-5052
Email: information@cambridge.org
Website: www.cambridge.org

CAMPBELL RIVER COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
301 St. Ann’s Road
Campbell River BC V9W 4C7
Canada
Tel: (250) 287-8000
Fax: (250) 287-8000
Email: mlashley@island.net

CANADA PRIMATE’S WORLD RELIEF AND DEVELOPMENT FUND OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA
600, Jarvis Street
Toronto, Onr. M4Y 2J6
Canada
Tel: +141692491.92
Fax: +141692444552

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
C/o The North-South Institute
200 – 55 Murray-
Ottawa KIN 5M3
Canada
Tel: 1-613-241-3535
Fax: 1-613-241-7435
Email: casid@nsi-ins.ca
Website: www.casid-acedi.ca

CANADIAN BUSINESS FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Rl 41-757 West Hastings Street
Suite #121
Vancouver BC, V6C IAI
Canada
Tel: 1-604-323-2714
Fax: 1-604-323-2715
Email: info@cbsr.ca
Website: www.cbsr.ca

DACHVERBAND DER KRITISCHEN AKTIONARINNEN UND AKTIONARE E.V.
Schlackstra Be 16, Koln 50737, Germany
Tel: 49-221-599-5647
Fax: 49-221-599-1024
Email: critical_shareholders@compuserve.com
Website: www.kritischeaktionaere.de

DALLA PARTE DE:GLI ULTIMI
Via XXIV Maggio
8 Campobasso 86100, Italy
Tel: 39-0874-69-8571

DANCHURCHAID
Norregade 13
1165 Copenhagen K, Denmark
Tel: +4533152800
Fax: +4533153860
Email: danchurchaid@dca.dk
danchurchaid@geo2.geonet.de
Website: www.noedhjaelp.dk

DANISH ASSOCIATION FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Studsgade 20
Arhus C 8000, Denmark
Tel: 45-8619-7766, 45-7731-0047
Fax: 45-8619-7061
Email: psigsgaa@ms-dan.dk
efarr@ms-dan.dk
hseierse@ms-dan.dk
Website: www.ms-dan.dk

DANISH BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
DANIDA Policy Planning Division
SI, Asiatisk Plads 2
Copenhagen K 1448
Denmark
Tel: 45-3392-1344
Fax: 45-3392-1623

DANISH COMMITTEE FOR AID TO AFGHAN REFUGEES (DACAAR)
10 Gul Mohar Lane
P.O. Box 855
University Town
Peshawar
Pakistan
Telefax: +92 91 840 516
E-mail: dacaar@pes.comsats.net.pk

DANISH COMMITTEE FOR AID TO AFGHAN REFUGEES (DACAAR)
C/o Danish Refugee Council
Borgergade 10
P.O. Box 53
1002 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Tel: +45 33 73 50 000
Fax: +45 33 32 84 48
Email: drc@drc.dk

DANISH COOPERATION FOR ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
Strandgade 29
Copenhagen K 1401
Denmark
Tel: 45-3266-0100, 45-3266-0375
Fax: 45-3266-0479, 45-3266-0131
Email: mst@mst.dk
danced@mst.dk
Website: www.mst.dk

DANISH INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE-DANIDA
Royal Danish Ministry of Foreign
Affairs
Multilateral Department
S-2, 2 Asiatisk Plads
Copenhagen K 1447
Denmark
Tel: 45-3392-0000
Fax: 45-3154-0533
Email: um@um.dk
Website: www.um.dk/danida/
Contact: Project Officer

DANISH PEOPLE’S AID
ASP-Dansk Folkehjaelp
Industriparken 4 P.O. Box 60
4960 Holeby
Denmark
Tel: +45/54-60-7400
Fax: +45/54-60-7399
Email: asf@asf-dansk-folkehjaelp.dk

DANISH PEOPLES RELIEF ORGANISATION
(Dansk Folkehjaelp)
Industriparken 4
Holeby 4960
Denmark
Tel: 45-5390-7400
Fax: 45-5390-7399
Email: asf@asf-dansk-folkehjaelp.dk
Website: www.asf-dansk-folkehjaelp.dk

DANISH REFUGEE COUNCIL
P.O. Box 53, Borgergade 10
Copenhagen DK-1002
Denmark
Tel: 45-3373-5000, 45-3373-5300
Fax: 45-3332-8448
Email: drc@drc.dk
Website: www.drc.dk

DANISH UNITED NATIONS ORGANIZATION
Midtermolen 3
Copenhagen DK-2100
Denmark
Tel: 45-3546-7373
Fax: 45-3546-7350
Email: fnforbundet@una.dk
Website: www.una.dk

DANMISSION
Sttandagervej 24
Hellerup 2900
Denmark
Tel: 45-3962-9911
Fax: 45-3962-0206
Email: danmission@danmission.dk
Website: www.danmission.dk

DATABASE OF NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS IN BULGARIA
UBFA – Union of Bulgarian
Foundations and Associations
47-51, Tzvetna gradina
St. Sofia 1421
Bulgaria
Tel: 359-2-65-6522, 359-2-65-7600
Fax: 359-2-65-7600
Email: wwwubfa@ngo.bg
Website: www.ngo.bg

DAUPHIN & DISTRICT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
Box 6
Dauphin MB R7N 2T9
Canada
Tel: (204) 638-4598
Fax: (204) 638-4598
Email: dphncf@escape.ca

DAVID AND LUCILE PACKARD FOUNDATION
300 Second Street, Suite 200
Los Altos California 904022 USA
Tel: 1-650-948-7658
Email: inquiries@packfound.org
Website: www.packfound.org

DEBT RELIEF INTERNATIONAL
77 Baker Street
London W1M 1AH, United Kingdom
Fax: 44-171-935-8009
Email: externalfinanceafrica@compuserve.com

DEFENSE ENTERPRISE FUND
20 Custom House Street Suite 1040
Boston MA 02110, USA
Tel: 1-617-261-1929
Fax: 1-617-261-1935
Website: www.cbi.co.ru/links/default.asp

DELEGACION DE LA COMISION EUROPEA
Paseo de la Reforma 1675
Lomas de Chapultepec Mexico 11000
Mexico
Tel: 52-5-540-3345, 52-5-540-3347
Fax: 52-5-540-6564
Email: mailto@delmex.cec.eu.int
andrea.ampudia@delmex.cec.eu.int
Website: www.delmex.cec.eu.int

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION (AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND)
P.O. Box 609 Canberra 2600, 18 Arkana Street
Yarralumla ACT 2600, Australia
Tel: 61-2-6271-2777 61-2-6271-2721
Fax: 61-2-6273-4445 61-2-6273-4944
Email: australia@ecdel.org.au
newzealand@ecdel.org.au
Website: www.ecdel.org.au

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION-BULGARIA
P.O. Box 668
Interpred World Trade Center
Dragan Tsankov Bid 36
Block A, 3rd floor
Sofia 1040, Bulgaria
Tel: 359-2-973-9840, 359-2-973-9842 to 45
Fax: 359-2-973-3872
Email: guest@marc.bg
Website: www.evropa.bg

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION-CANADA
45 O’Connor Street, Suite 1900
Ottawa Ontario K1P 1A4
Canada
Tel: 1-613-238-6464
Fax: 1-613-238-1649, 1-613-238-5191
Website: www.eudelcan.org

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION-HUNGARY
H-1016 Budapest
Berc utca 23
Hungary
Tel: 36-1-209-9700, 36-1-166-4487
Fax: 36-1-166-4221
Website: www.eudelegation.hu

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION-JAPAN
Europa House
9-15 Sanban-cho Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 102, Japan
Tel: 81-3-3239-0441
Fax: 81-3-3261-5194
Website: www.jpn.cec.eu.int

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION
Al. Ujazdowskie 14
Warsaw 00478
Poland
Tel: 48-22-621-6401, 48-2-621-6402
Fax: 48-22-625-0430
Website: www.europa.eu.int

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION
2300 M Street NW
Washington DC 20037
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-862-9500
Fax: 1-202-429-1766
Email: help@eurunion.org
Website: www.eurunion.org

DELPHI INTERNATIONAL
1090 Vermont Avenue, NW, 7th Floor
Washington DC 20005
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-898-0950
Fax: 1-202-842-0885
Website: www.delphi-int.org

DEPARTMENT FOR EDUCATION AND SKILLS
Sanctuary Buildings, Great Smith Street
London SWIP 3BT
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-870-000-2288
Fax: 44-1928-79-4248
Email: info@dfes.gsi.gov.uk
Website: www.dfes.gov.uk

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT-DFID
94, Victoria Street, London, SWIE 5JL
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-1355-84-3362, 44-20-7917-7000
Fax: 44-1355-84-4099, 44-20-7916-0019
Email: enquiry@dfid.gtnet.gov.uk
Website: www.dfid.gov.uk

EARTHWATCH
P.O. Box 403, Watertown
Massachusetts 02272 USA
Tel: (1-800) 776-0188
Fax: (1-617) 926-8532
Email: info@earthwatch.org
Website: www.earthwatch.org

EARTHWATCH EUROPE
57 Woodstock Rd.
Oxford 0X2 6HJ, UK
Tel: (440)1865-311-600
Fax: (440)1865-311-383
Email: info@uk.earthwatch.org

EAST MEETS WEST FOUNDATION
Box 29292
Oakland CA 94604, USA
Tel: 1-510-763-7045
Fax: 1-510-763-7045
Website: www.eastmeetswest.org

EC – COMMISSION OT THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES
Jean Monnet House, 8 Storey’s Gate
London SWIP 3AT
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7973-1992
Website: www.europa.eu.int

EC-NGO NETWORK – UK PLATFORM
17 Grove Lane
London SE5 8RD
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7703-5400 ext. 2849
Fax: 44-20-7703-2278, 44-2Q-7793-7630
Email: ecngo@scfuk.org.uk
ngallagher@scfuk.org.uk
Website: www.nt.oneworid.nl/liaison/gb/gb.htm

ECOOPERATION FOUNDATION
Postbus 2847
Herengracht 455
Amsterdam 1000 CV
Netherlands
Tel: 31-20-422-1140
Fax: 31-20-422-1141
Email: info@ecooperation.org
Website: www.ecooperadon.org

ECOMARKT – STICHTING MILIEUWIJZER
Mimosastraat 62
Utrecht 3551 DD
Netherlands
Tel: 31-30-244-8384
Email: ecomarkt@ecomarkt.nl
Website: www.ecomarkt.nl

ECONET ACTION FUND
EAF Secretariat
C/o EUCC, P.O.BOX 11232
Leiden 2301 EE
The Netherlands
Tel: (31-71) 512-2900
Fax: (31-71) 512-4069
Email: eaf@eucc.nl
Website: www.eucc-nl

ECONOMIC FOUNDATION
AL Ujazdowskie 41
Warsaw 00-540, Poland
Tel: 48-22-628-4862
Fax: 48-22-621-9130

ECONOMIE ET HUMANISME
14, Rue Antonie Dumont
Lyon Cedex 08 69372, France
Tel: 33-4-7271-6666
Fax: 33-4-7869-8696
Website: www.perso.wanadoo.fr/eh

ECONOMISTAS SIN FRONTERAS
Centre) Asociado UNED Andres
Manjon
C/ Francos Rodriguez
77 Madrid 28039, Spain
Tel: 34-91-459-4593
Email: ecosfron@ecosfron.org
Website: www.ecosfron.org

ECPAT AUSTRALIA
P.O.Box 451
South Melbourne VIC 3205, Australia
Tel: 61-3-9645-8911
Fax: 61-3-9645-8922
Email: ecpat@ecpat.org
Website: www.ecpat.org

ECPAT DEUTSCHLAND – ARBEITSGEMEINSCHAFT GEGEN KOMMERZIELLE UND SEXUELLE AUSBEUTUNG VON KINDERN
Postfach 5328, Freiburg 79020
Germany
Tel: 49-761-707-5124
Fax: 49-761-707-5123
Email: ecpat-d@t-online.de
info@ecpat.de
Website: www.ecpat.de

ECPAT UK
The Stable Yard, Broomgrove Road
London SW9 9TL
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7501-8927
Fax: 44-20-7738-4110
Email: ecpatuk@antislavery.org
Website: www.ecpat.org

ECUMENICAL CHURCH LOAN FUND
P.O. Box 2100
150 Rte de Ferney
Geneva 21211
Switzerland
Tel: 41-22-791-6312
Fax: 41-22-710-2005
Email: gmp@eclof.org
eclof@eclof.org
Website: www.eclof.org

ECUMENICAL YOUTH COUNCIL IN EUROPE
5, Rue du Champ de Mars
1050 Brussels
Belgium
Tel: +32 2 510 61 87 Mobile: +32 485 915895
Fax: +32 2 510 61 72
Email: getieral.secretary@eyce.org
Website: www.eyce.org
Contact: General Secretary

EDIFICANDO – COMUNIDAD DE NAZARETH
Joaqum Costa 21, bajo izq.
Madrid 28002
Spain
Tel: 34-91-563-5839
Fax: 34-91-561-7261
Email: edificando@navegalia.com

EDITORIAL AMNISllA INTERNACIONAL, S. L.
Valderribas, 13
Madrid 28007
Spain
Tel: 34-914-33-4116, 34-914-33-2520
Fax: 34-914-33-6568
Email: edai@edai.org
Website: www.edai.org

EDMONTON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
10117 Jasper Avenue, Suite 710
EdmontonABT5J IW8
Canada
Tel: (780) 426-0015
Fax: (780) 425-0121
Email: info@ecfoundarion.org
Website: www.ecfoundadon.org

EDUCACION SIN FRONTERAS
Josep Anselm Clave 6,1o-1a
Barcelona 08002
Spain
Tel: 34-93-412-7217, 34-91-786-2841
Fax: 34-93-412-4036
Email: web@educacionsinfronteras.org
informacion@educacionsinfronteras.org
Website: www.educacionsinfronteras.org

EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT CENTER, INC.
55 Chapel Street Newton MA 02458
United States of America
Tel: 1-617-969-7100
Fax: 1-617-969-3401
Email: www@edc.org
Website: www.edc.org

EFFATA EINE-WELT-KREIS E.V.
KirschgartenstraBe 35
Heidelberg 69126
Germany
Tel: 49-6221-30-7844
Fax: 49-6221-30-7844
Email: post@effata.de
Website: www.effata.de

EINE-WELT-ZENTRUM – EWZ
Kulturzentrum Karistorbahnhof
Am Karlstor I Heidelberg 69117
Germany
Tel: 49-6221-9789-29
Fax: 49-6221-9789-31
Email: EWZ@Karistorbahnhof.de

EIRENE INTERNATIONALER CHRISTLICHER FRIEDENSDIENST E.V.
Postfach 1322
Engerser StraCe 74 b
Neuwied 56564
Germany
Tel: 49-2631-8379-0, 49-2631-8379-11
Fax: 49-2631-3116-0
Email: eirene-int@eirene.org
Website: www.eirene.org/

EKO-OSUUSPANKKI
Kaankwa 2 Al
Helsinki 00940
Finland
Tel: 358-9-3044-53
Fax: 358-9-7661-35

EL CARACOL
Calle Heliodoro Valle No. 337
Col. Lorenzo Boturini Del. Venustiano Carranza
Ciudad de Mexico C.P. 15820
Mexico
Tel: 52-5-768-1204
Fax: 52-5-764-2121
Email: caracol@supernet.com.mx
Website: www.el-caracol.org.mx

ELKHORN AREA FOUNDATION
P.O. Box 25
Elkhorn MB ROM ONO
Canada
Tel: 204-845-2251
Fax: 204-845-2602

EMBAJADADEALEMANIA
Lord Byron 737
Col. Polanco Mexico D.F. 11560
Mexico
Tel: 52-5-283-2200, 52-5-545-6655
Fax: 52-5-281-2588
Email: embal@maiLintemet.com.mx
Website: www.government.de

EMBASSY WEB
Solsbury / infoCatch, 2111 Wilson
Boulevard
Suite 700 Arlington VA 22201
United States of America
Tel: 1-703-351-5098
Fax: 1-703-558-0133
Website: www.embassy.org

EMERGENCY (Life Support for Civilian War Victims)
Via Bagutta, 12, 20121 Milano, Italia
Tel: 39-02-7600-1104
Fax: 39-02-7600-3719
Email: emergenc@tin.it
emergenc@emergency.it
Website: www.emergeacy.it

FACE TO FACE FOUNDATION
42 Burlington Road
London W4 4BE, United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-8742-1731
Fax: 44-20-8742-1731
1021 FADO
Limburgstraat 62, Gent 9000
Belgium
Tel: 32-9-329-4784
Fax: 32-9-329-4799
Email: fado@pandora.be

FAMILY FIRM INSTITUTE INC., THE
221 North Beacon Street
Boston MA 02135-1943, USA
Tel: 1-617-789-4200
Fax: 1-617-789-4220
Email: info@ffi.org
Website: www.ffi.org

FAMILY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL
ASIA REGIONAL OFFICE
Arwan Building, 8th Floor
1339 Pracharat 1 Road, Banfsue
Bangkok 108 00
Thailand
Tel: 66 2 587 4750
Fax: 662 587 4758

FAMILY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL
P.O. Box 13950
Research Triangle Park NC 27709
United States of America
Tel: 1-919-544-7040
Fax: 1-919-544-7261
Email: services@flni.org
publications@fhi.org
Website: www.fhi.org

FAMILY PLANNING INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE
Planned Parenthood Federation of America
810 Seventh Avenue New York
NY 10019
United States of America
TEL: 1-212-541-7800
Fax: 1-212-247-6274
Email: fpia@ppfa.org
Website: www.plannedparenthood.org

FARMACEUTICOS MUNDI
Avda. de la Albufera, 58 Alfafar
Valencia 46910
Spain
Tel: 34-90-201-1717
Fax: 34-96-375-5695
Email: info@farmamundi.org
Website: www.farmamundi.org

FARMAC~UTICOS SIN FRONTERAS DE ESPANA
C/ Fernando el Santo, 24 – 1° C
Madrid 28010, Spain
Tel: 34-91-308-1173
Fax: 34-91-308-1173
Email: fsfe@mad.servicom.es
Website: www.servicom.es/fsfe

FARNEBO FOLKHOGSKOLA
Box 23 Osterfarnebo 810 20, Sweden
Tel: 46-2912-0275
Fax: 46-2912-0574
Website: www.farnebo.fhsk.se

FASTENOPFER DES SCHWEIZER KATHOLIKEN (SWISS CATHOLIC LENTEN FUND)
Habsburgersttasse 44, Postfach 2856
6002 Luzern, Switzerland
Tel: +41412107655
Fax: +4141231362
Email: mail@fastenopfer.ch
Website: www.fastenopfer.ch

FASTENOPFER KATHOLISCHES HILFSWERK SCHWEIZ
Postfach 2856, Habsburgersttasse 44
Luzern 6002, Switzerland
Tel: 41-41-210-7655
Fax: 41-41-210-1362
Email: mail@fastenopfer.ch
Website: www.fastenopfer.ch

FAUNA AND FLORA INTERNATIONAL-100% FUND
Great Eastern House, Tension Road
Cambridge, CBI 2DT, UK
Tel: Tel: (44-01223) 461-471
Fax: (44-01223) 461-481
Email: info@ffint.org
Website: www.ffi.org.uk

FEDERACION CATALANA D’ONGS
Junta De Conerg, Zu. PPal.
Barcelona 08001
Spain
Tel: 34-93-319-0109
Fax: 34-93-310-4450

FEDERACION DE RELIGIOSOS SANITARIOS
C/ Santa Engracia 131 -2° izda
Madrid 28033
Spain
Tel: 34-91-441-1733
Fax: 34-91-441-9726
Email: fers2@planalfa.es

FEDERACION ESPANOLA DE RELIGIOSOS DE ENSENANZA
Hacienda de Pavones, 5-1°
Madrid 28030
Spain
Tel: 34-91-328-8000
Fax: 34-91-328-8001
Email: ferecooperacion@planalfa.es
Website: www.planalfa.es/fere

FEDERACION MEXICANA DE ASOCIACIONES PRIVADAS DE SALUD Y DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO
Plutarco Elias Calles # 744 norte
colonia Progresista Cd. Juarez Chih.
32310
Mexico
Tel: 52-1-616-0833
Fax: 52-1-616-6535
Website: www.femap.org.mx

FEDERACION SERSO
Plaza Fernandez Ladreda
2 Madrid 28026
Spain
Tel: 34-91-469-0204
Fax: 34-91-565-1608
Email: serso@arrakis.es

FEDERAL MINISTRY OF ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT, THE (BMZ)
Bundesministerium fur Wirtschaftliche
Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung
Friedrich-Ebert-Allee 40
53113 Bonn
Germany
Tel: +49 228 / 535-0
Fax: +49 228 / 535-3500
Email: poststelle@bm2.bund400.de
Website: www.bmz.de

FEDERATION DES ASSOCIATIONS COOPERATIVES D’ECONOMIE FAMILIALE
815 Ave Laurier, Est Montreal
Montreal Quebec H2J 1G2
Canada
Tel: 1-514-271-7004
Fax: 1-514-271-7004

FEDERATION DES ASSOCIATIONS LOVE MONEY POUR L’EMPLOI
10, rue Montyon, Paris 75009
France
Tel: 33-1-4824-1089
Fax: 33-1-4TOO-0335
Email: federation@lovemoney.org
Website: www.lovemoney.org

FEDERATION MONDIALE DES CITES UNIES
60, rue La Boetie
Paris 75008, France
Tel: 33-1-5396-0580, 33-1-4561-2454
Fax: 33-1-5396-0581, 33-1-4563-2610
Email: cites.unies@wanadoo.fr
Website: www.mnet.fr/vietnamtoday/com.asso.cooperation.htm

FEDERATION OF AUSTRALIAN JEWISH COMMUNITY SERVICES
P.O.Box 500
25-27 Alma Rd
St Kilda VIC, Australia
Tel: 03 9525 4000
Fax: 03 9525 3737
Email: jcs@jcs.org.au

FEDERATION OF THE PROTESTANT CHURCHES IN ITALY
Federazione delle Chiese Evangeliche in Italia – FCEI
Via Firenze 38
00184 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39 06 482 51 20
Fax: +39 06 482 87 28
Email: fed.evangelica@agora.stm.it
Contact: General Secretary

FEDERAZIONE ORGANISMI CRISTIANI Dl SERVIZIO INTERNAZIONALE VOLONTARIO
18 Via S. Francesco di Sales
Rome 00165, Italy
Tel: 39-06-687-7796, 39-06-687-7867
Fax: 39-06-687-2373
Email: focsiv@focsiv.it
focsiv@www.glauco.it
Website: www.focsiv.it

FEED MY PEOPLE INTERNATIONAL, LIT
11052 North 24th Avenue
Phoenix AZ 85029
United States of America
Tel: 1-602-678-3285
Fax: 1-602-678-3288
Email: fmpidsa@primenet.com
Website: www.childrenscharities.org

FEED THE CHILDREN
P.O. Box 36 Oklahoma City OK 7310
United States of America
Tel: 1-405-945-4149, 1-405-942-0228
Fax: 1-405-945-4168, -405-945-4177
Email: ftc@feedthechildren.org
Website: www.feedthechildren.org

FEINSTEIN FOUNDATION
37 Alhambra Circle
Cranston Rl 02905
United States of America
Tel: 1-401-467-5155
Fax: 1-401-941-0988
Email: asf@iatap.net
Website: www.feinsteinfoundation.com

FEMALE ACCESS TO CREDIT AND TRAINING
3903 San Pedro St. Tampa FL 33629
United States of America
Tel: 1-813-839-5102
Fax: 1-813-839-5102
Email: 102475.1434@compuserve.com

FEMINIST MAJORITY FOUNDATION
1600 WUson Boulevard, Suite 801
Arlington VA 22209
United States of America
Tel: 1-703-522-2214
Fax: 1-703-522-2219
Email: comments@feminist.org
femmaj@feminist.org
Website: www.feminist.org

GAO – COOPERAZIONE INTERNAZIONALE
C/o UNICAL, Dip. Sodologia e
Scienza
Politica Reade Cs 87030
Italy
Tel: 39-0984-49-2535
Fax: 39-0984-40-1324
Email: gao@unical.it
Website: www.sociologia.unical.it/gao

GAVUEBORGS BISTANDSGRUI
Televagen 2 Valbo 818 33
Sweden
Tel: 46-2613-2985
Fax: 46-2613-2833

GEMEENSCHAPPELIJK OVERLEG MEDEFINANCIERING
Postbus 77, Rhijngeestetweg 40
Oegstgeest 2340 AB, Netherlands
Tel: 31-71-515-9231
Fax: 31-71-517-5391

GENCTUR
Istikial Cad. Zambak Sok. 15/5 Taksim
Istanbul 80080, Turkey
Tel: 90-212-249-2515, 90-212-243-4131
Fax: 90-212-249-2554
Email: gsm@gsm-youth.org
Website: www.genctur.com

GENCUKAKTIVITELERI SERVISI
Bayindir Sok 45/9 Kizilay
Ankara 06650, Turkey
Tel: 90-312-417-1124, 90-312-417-2991
Fax: 90-312-425-8192
Email: gsm@gsm-youth.org
Website: www.gsm-youth.org

GENERAL COMMITTEE OF AGRICULTURAL COOPERATION IN THE EC (COGECA)
Rue de la Science, 23/25
1040 Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +3222872711
Fax: +32 2 2872700
Email: postmaster@copa-cogeca.be
Website: www.cogeca.be
Contact: Secretary General

GENERAL DIRECTORATE FOR DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Piazzale della Farnesina
00194 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39636911
Fax: +39 6 3222850
Website: www.esterijt./eiig/thefarensina

GENERAL SERVICE FOUNDATION
557 N. Mill St., Ste. 201
Aspen, CO 81611-1513
Tel: (970 920 6834
Fax: (970) 920 4578
Email: gsf@rof.net

GERAEO
3560 Fort RoUand Lachine
Quebec H8TTV7, Canada
Tel: 1-514-637-6984
Fax: 1-514-637-6009

GERED GEREEDSCHAP
Postbus 3767
Bouwdijk Bastiaansesttaat 32
Amsterdam 1001 AN, Netherlands
Tel: 31-20-683-9609
Fax: 31-20-612-4502
GERMAN ACADEMIC EXCHANGE SERVICE (DAAD)
Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst
Kennedyallee 50, 53175 Bonn, Germany
Tel: +49 228 8820
Fax: +49 228 882 444
Email: postmaster@daad.de
Website: www.daad.de

GERMAN ADVISORY COUNCIL ON GLOBAL CHANGE (WBGU)
WBGU Secretariat
Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and
Marine Research
P.O.Box 12 01 61
27515 Bremerhaven, Germany
Tel: +49 (0) 471 4831 723
Fax: +49 (0) 471 4831 218
Email: wbgu@awi-bremerhaven.de
Website: www.wbgu.de

GERMAN AGROACTION
Personalburo FG 32,
Code: PK TAD, Adenauerallee 134
D-53113 Bonn, Germany
Tel: 49-2282-2880
Fax: 49-2282-2071-0
Email: 106027.2752@compuserve.com
Website: www.welthungerhilfe.de

GERMAN DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE ASSOCIATION FOR SOCIAL HOUSING (DESWOS)
Bismarckstrasse 7
50672 Koln, Germany
Tel: +49 221579890
Fax: +49 22157989164
Email: deswos@konvoi.de
Website: www.deswos.de

GERMAN FOUNDATION FOR WORLD POPULATION – DSW
Goettinger Chaussee 115
30459 Hannover, Germany
Tel: ++49 511943730
Fax: ++49 5112345051
Email: info@dswhannover.de
Website: www.dsw-online.de
Contact: Dr. Joerg F. Maas
Email: joerg.maas@dsw-hannover.de

GERMAN RESEARCH FOUNDATION (DFG)
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
Kennedyallee 40, 53175 Bonn, Germany
Tel: +49 228 8851
Email: postmaster@dfg.d400.de
Website: www.dfg.de

GESELLSCHAFT FUR SOLIDARISCHE ENTWICKLlJNGSZLISAMMENARBET E.V.
Gerberbruch 14
Rostock 18055
Germany
Tel: 49-381-490-2410
Fax: 49-381-490-2491
Email: gse-mv@moin.de
Website: www.gse-mv.de

GESELLSCHAFT F&R TECHNISCHE ZUSAMMENARBEIT (GTZ) – GERMAN TECHNICAL COOPERATION
Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische
Zusammenarbeit (GTZ)
Dag-Hammarskjold Weg 1-5
65760 Eschborn
Germany
Tel: 49 61 96 79 0
Fax: 49 61 96 79 11 15
Website: www.gtz.de

GIATROI HORIS SYNORA / MEDECINS SANS FRONTIERES GRECE
Stournari 57
104 32 Athens
Greece
Tel: +30-1-5-200500, 4-30-93-70-27-447
Fax: +30-1-5-200503
Email: sophi@msf.gr , press@msf.gr
tzanetos@msf.gr , msf-missions@lais.eos.gr
Website: www.msf.gr

GIBBONS COMMUNITY VENTURES
148 Sackett Street, #3
Brooklyn NY 11231
United States of America
Tel: 1-718-625-2538
Fax: 1-718-875-5631

GIFTS IN KIND INTERNATIONAL
333 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria VA 22314, USA
Tel: 1-703-836-2121
Fax: 1-703-549-1481
Email: feedback@GiftslnKind.org
Website: www.giftsinkind.org

GLENBORO AREA FOUNDATION, THE
604 Railway Ave., P.O. Box 147
Glenboro MB ROK 0X0, Canada
Tel: (204) 827-2424
Fax: (204) 827-2424
Email: glencomm@mb.symparico.ca

GLOBAL CAPITAL
809 Bowie Road
RockviUe MD 20852-1042
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-828-5946
Fax: 1-301-294-2111

GLOBAL DIRECTORY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY
ECO Services International
Information Systems Group
Im DOrfli 23 Dietikon
Zurich 8953, Switzerland
Fax: 41-1-742-1242
Email: info@eco-web.com
Website: www.eco-web.com

GLOBAL EDUCATION CENT OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA
1st Floor, lorrens Bld
220 Victoria Square
Adelaide SA
Australia
Tel: 08 8221 6744
Fax: 08 8221 6755
Email: gecsa@global-education.asn.au
Website: www.global-education.asn.au

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY, THE (GEF)
The GEF Secretariat
1818 H Street Northwest
Washington, District of Columbia
20433
USA
Tel: 1-202-473-0508, 1-202-458-7117
Fax: 1-202-522-3240, 1-202-522-3245
Email: gef@gefweb.org
harcher@worldbank.org
Website: www.gefweb.org

GLOBAL FUND FOR WOMEN
425 Sherman Avenue, Suite 300
Palo Alto California 94306-1823
United States of America
Tel: 1-650-853-8305
Fax: 1-650-328-0384
Email: gfw@globalfundforwomen.org
Website: www.globalfundforwomen.org

GLOBAL GROUP 21
1726 Twenty First Street NW
Washington DC 20009
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-518-3750
Fax: 1-202-518-3745

GLOBAL HEALTH COUNCIL (GHC)
20 Palmer Court
White River Junction
VT 05001, USA
Tel: 1-802 649 1340
Fax: 1-802 649 1396
Email: ghc@globalhealth.org
jpalmer@globalhealth.org
Website: www.globalhealth.org

GLOBAL JEWISH ASSISTANCE & RELIEF NETWORK (GJARN)
666 Fifth Avenue, Suite 246
New York, NY 10103
USA
Tel: 1-212-868-3636
Fax: 1-212-868-7878
Email: gjarn@igc.apc.org
Website: www.globaljewish.org

GLOBAL NETWORK
24042 Carillo Drive Mission
Viejo CA 92691
United States of America
Fax: 1-949-583-1497

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AUSTRALIA
P.O.Box 1154
Suite I, Level 2, 96 Phillip Street
Parramatta NSW, Australia
Tel: 02 9635 0199
Fax: 02 9635 0299
Email: hfhausttalia@optusnet.com.au

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY INTERNATIONAL (HFHI)
121 Habitat St.
Americus GA 31709
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-924-6935
Fax: 01-229-924-0641
Email: publicinfo@hfhi.org
Website: www.habitat-org

HALIFAX FOUNDATION, THE
P.O. Box 2635, Bedford Row Post
Office
Halifax NS B3J 3P7
Canada
Tel: (902) 422-9438
Fax: (902) 429-1073
Email: the_halifax_foundation@canada.com
Website: www.region.halifax.ns.ca/foundation/index.html

HAMILTON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
110 King Street West
Suite 310, Robert Thomson Building
Hamilton ON L8P 4S6
Canada
Tel: (905)523-5600
Fax: (905) 523-0741
Email: information@hcf.on.ca
Website: www.hcf.on.ca

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
ERAC, 14 avenue Berthelot-
F-69631 LYON Cedex 07
France
Tel: (33) 4 7869 7979
Fax: (33) 4 7869 7994
Email: contact@handicap-international.org
handicap_int_lyon@compuserve.com
Website: www.handicap-internarional.org
Contact: President

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
Rue de Spa, 67
Bruxelles B-1000, Belgium
Tel: 32-2-280-1601
Fax: 32-2-230-6030
Email: headoffice@handicap.be
Website: www.handicapinternational.be

HANS-SEIDEL-STIFTUNG E.V.
Lazarettstr, 33
Munchen 80636
Germany
Email: info@hss.de
Website: www.hss.de/home/home1.htm

HARRY FRANK GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION, THE
527 Madison Ave. 15th PL
New York, NY 10022-4304
USA
Tel: +1212 644-4907
Fax: +1212644-5110
Email: www.hfg.org

HARVARD INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
One Eliot Street
Cambridge MA 02138
United States of America
Tel: 1-617-495-4511, 1-617-495-2161
Fax: 1-617-495-0527
Website: www.hiid.harvard.edu

HARVEST HELP
3-4 Old Bakery Row
Wellington Telford TF1 1PS
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-1952-26-0699
Fax: 44-1952-24-7158
Email: info@harvesthelp.org
Website: www.harvesthelp.org

HASBRO CHILDREN’S FOUNDATION
32 West 23rd Street
New York, NY 10010
USA
Tel: (917) 606-6226
Website: www.hasbro.org

HEALTH AND EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS, INC,
1421 Dolley Madison Blvd.
Suite E McLean VA 22101
United States of America
Tel: 1-703-448-8930
Fax: 1-703-448-8969
Email: vnahl@aol.com
Website: www.vnah.com

HEALTH EDUCATION LINKAGE PROGRAMS (H.E.L.P.)
P.O. Box 11434
Birmingham, AL 35202-1434
USA
Tel: + (205)583-0292
Email: margaretellisonrn@hotmail.com
heartsavr@hotmail.com

HEALTH FROMTIERS
44500 66th Ave. Way
Kenyon MN 55946
United States of America
Tel: 1-507-789-6725
Fax: 1-507-789-6575
Email: kno@po.cwru.edu
Website: www.healthfrontiers.org

HEALTHNET INTERNATIONAL
Maassluisstraat 258
1062 GL Amsterdam, Sweden
Tel: + 31 20 5120640
Fax: + 31 20 4201503
Email: office@hni.nl
Jobs: hrm@hni.nl
Website: www.healthnetinternational.org
Contact: Director
Email: willem@hni.nl

HEALTHNET INTERNATIONAL
Maassluisstraat 258
Amsterdam 1062 GL, Netherlands
Tel: 31-20-512-0640
Fax: 31-20-420-1503
Email: office@hni.nl
Website: www.healthnetinternational.org

HEALTH VOLUNTEERS OVERSEAS
C/o Washington Station, P.O. Box 65157
Washington, D.C. 20035-5157, USA
Tel: 1-202-296-0928
Fax: 1-202-296-8018
Email: hvonj@aol.com
Website: www.hvousa.org

HEART TO HEART INTERNATIONAL
401 S.CIairborne, Ste. 302
Olathe, KS 66062, USA
Tel: (913) 764-5200

HEIFER PROJECT INTERNATIONAL, INC.
P.O. Box 808, 1015 South Louisiana Street
Little Rock AR 72202, USA
Tel: 1-501-376-8936, 1-501-376-6836
Fax: 1-501-376-8906
Email: project@heifer.org
Website: www.intellinet.com/Heifer

HEINRICH BOLL STIPTUNG E.V.
Hackesche Hofe
Rosenthaler Str. 40/41
Berlin 10178
Germany
Tel: 49-30-2853-40
Fax: 49 -30-2853-4109
Email: info@boell.de
Website: www.boell.de

HELEN KELLER INTERNATIONAL
90 West St., 2nd Floor, Suite 200
New York NY 10006
United States of America
Tel: 1-212-766-5266
Fax: 1-212-791-7590
Email: info@hkworld.org
Website: www.hki.org

HELLENIC ASSOCIATION FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (HA.I.D.)
Moshonision 5
68100 Alexandroupolis
Greece
Tel: 00 30 551 35031, + 30 944 71 8397
Fax: 00 30 551 82794
Emails hellenicaid@axd.forthnet.gr

HELP
60, The Pleasance
Edinburgh, EH8 91J
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-131-556-9497
Fax: 44-131-668-4177

HELPAGE INTEKNATIONAL(HAI)
67-74 Saffron Hill
London EC1N 8QX
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-71-404-7201
Fax: 44-71-404-7203
Email: hai@helpage.org
press@helpage.org
finance@helpage.org
Website: www.oneworld.org/helpage
Contact: Chief Executive

HELP-HILFE ZUR SELBSTHILFE E.V. (HELP)
Reuterstr. 39
53115 Bonn
Germany
Tel: +49 228 915290, +49 228 9152911, +0172 2306499
Fax: +49 228 9152999
Website: www.help-ev.de
Contact: Managing Director
Email: help-ev.nierwetberg@t-online.de
Headphone: +49 228 9152913

HELPING TO REACH MANY THROUGH DIRECT ASSISTANCE IN DEVELOPMENT
430 Shore Road, Apartment 6D
Long Beach NY 11561
United States of America
Tel: 1-516-431-6602
Fax: 1-516-897-2981
Email: contact@hermandad.org
Website: www.hermandad.org

HELP INTERNATIONAL INC.
P.O.Box 2804
Unit 4, 59 O’Connell St
North Parramatta NSW
Australia
Tel: 02 9484 5396
Fax: 02 9899 2602
Email: helplri@yahoo.com

HELP INTERNATIONAL, INC.
12501 Old Columbia
Pike Silver Spring MD 20904
United States of America
Tel: 1-301-680-6366
Fax: 1-301-854-1166
Email: 74617.1701@compuserve.com

HELVETAS-SWISS ASSOCIATION FOR DEVELOPMENT AND COOPERATION
P.O. Box 181
St. Moritzstrasse 15
Zurich 8042
Switzerland
Tel: 41-1-368-6500, 41-1-363-5060
Fax: 41-1-368-6580, 41-1-362-2953
Email: info@helvetas.ch
helvetas@helvetas.ch
Website: www.helvetas.ch

BIS – DENMARK
Noerrebrogade 68B
Copenhagen N 2200
Denmark
Tel: 45-3535-8788
Fax: 45-3535-0696
Email: ibis@ibis.dk
Website: www.ibis.dk/

ICCO
P.O.Box 151 Zustetplein 22A
3700 AD Zeist Zeist
The Netherlands
Tel: +31-30-6927811
Fax +31-30-6925614
Email: Admin@icco.nl
Website: www.icco.nl

ICELANDIC CHURCH AID
Laugavegi 31
150 Reykjavik
Iceland
Tel: +354 562 4400
Fax: +354 562 4495
Email: iceaid@help.is
Contact: Director

IDEALIST
C/o Action Without Borders, Inc.
350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 6614
New York NY 10118
United States of America
Tel: 1-212-843-3973
Fax: 1-212-564-3377
Email: info@idealist.org
Website: www.idealist.org

IEDER VOOR ALLEN
Postbus 101
Minderbroederstraat, 8
Leuven B-3000
Belgium
Tel: 32-16-24-2156
Fax: 32-16-24-2136
Email: iva@boerenbond.be
Website: www.boerenbond.be

IGNACIO MARTIN-BARO FUND FOR MENTAL HEALTH & HUMAN RIGHTS
P.O. Box 2122
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
USA
Tel: (212) 529-5300
Website: www.martinbarofund.org

IHDP
Walter-Flex-Sttasse – 3
53113 Bonn
Germany
Tel: +49 228 739 050
Fax: +49 228 739 054
Email: ihdp@uni-bonn.de
Staff.ihdp@uni-bonn.de

IMA – TRAINING FOR DEVELOPMENT
36 Robertson Road Brighton East
Sussex BNI 5NL
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-1273-55-9000
Fax: 44-1273-50-0045
Website: www.ima.uk.com

IMF/FMI-PONDS MONETAIRE INTERNATIONAL
64-66, Avenue d’lena
Paris 75116
France
Tel: 33-1-4069-3076
Fax: 33-1-4723-4089
Website: www.imf.org/external/np/adm/rec/recruit.htm

IMMIGRANT CENTER, THE
720 North King Street
Honolulu Haiwaii 96817
United States of America
Tel: 1-808-845-3918
Fax: 1-808-842-1962
Email: ic720@pixi.com

IMPACT-INTERAIDE
44, rue de la Parisse
Versailles 78000
France
Tel: 33-1-3902-3859
Fax: 33-1-3953-1128

INCODAP
275 Bank Street, Suite 400
Ottawa ON K2P 2L6
Canada
Tel: 1-613-238-6711
Fax: 1-613-567-0658
Website: www.coopcca.com

INCOME GENERATING PROJECT FOR MARGINAL FARMERS AND LANDLESS
Tollgate Cottage, London Road
Harro-on-the-Hill Middlesex HA1 3JJ
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-8422-4291
Website: www.p4k.org

INDEPENDENT MEANS INC.
126 Powers Ave. Santa Barbara CA
93103
United States of America
Tel: 1-805-965-0475, 1-800-350-1816
Fax: 1-805-965-3148
Email: webmaster@independentmeans.com
Website: www.anincomeofherown.com

INDEPENEteNT SECTOR, THE
1200 Eighteenth .Street, NW, Suite 200
Washington DC 20036
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-467-6100
Fax: 1-202-467-6101
Email: info@lndependentSector.org
Website: www.indepsec.org

INDIANA UNIVERSITY CENTER ON PHILANTHROPY
The Fund Raising School
550 W North St., #301
Indianapolis IN 46202-3272, USA
Tel: 1-317-274-4200
Fax: 1-317-684-8900
Email: etempel@iupui.edu
Website: www.philanthropy.iupui.edu

INDIAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICE
P.O. Box 980
Chicago IL 60690
United States of America
Tel: 1-630-961-0381
Email: mvasandani@dupageco.org
Website: www.he.net/~ids

INDIA NETWORK FOUNDATION
P.O. Box 556
Bowling Green OH 43402
United States of America
Tel: 1-419-352-9335
Fax: 1-419-352-9334
Email: inf@indnet.org
Website: www.india.bgsu.edu

INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT ACCOUNTS
CFED – Corporation for Enterprise Development
777 North Capitol Street, NE, Suite 410
Washington DC 20002
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-408-9788
Fax: 1-202-408-9793
Email: cfed@cfed.org
Website: www.idanetwork.org

INDIVIDUELL MANNAISKOHJALP
Box 45
Lund 22100
Sweden
Tel: 46-4632-9930
Fax: 46-4615-8309
Email: individuell@manniskohjalp.se
Website: www.manniskohjalp.se

INDONESIA PROJECT
Research School of Pacific & Asian Studies
The Australian National University
Canberra Act 0200, Australia
Tel: 61 2 6125 3794
Fax: 61 2 6125 3700
Email: indonesia.project@anu.edu.au
Website: www.economics.anu.edu.au/ip

INGENIERIA SIN FRONTERAS FEDERACION ESPANOLA
Jose Gutierrez Abascal
2 Madrid 28006
Spain
Tel: 34-91-336-3085
Fax: 34-91-561-9219
Email: isf@congde.org
Website: www.ingenieriasinfronteras.org

INICJATIVWA MIKRO / MICRO INITIATIVE
Al. Krasinskiego 11-a
Krakow 31-111, Poland
Tel: 48-12-422-4257, 48-12-422-7044
Fax: 48-12-422-4257 48-12-36-1263
Email: inimikro@bci.krakow.pl

INICIATIVAPtJBLICA CIUDADANA, DESARROLLO, EDUCACION Y CULTURA AUTOGESTIONARIOS, EQUIPO PUEBLO, A.C.
Apartado Postal 27467
Franciso Field Jurado No. 51
Col. Independencia 03630, Mexico, D.F.
Mexico
Tel: 52-5-539-0015, 52-5-539-0055
Fax: 52-5-672-7453

INITIATIVE DEVELOPPEMEN
66, Bd. Anatole France
Poitiers F-86000, France
Tel: 33-549-60-8966
Fax: 33-549-60-8901
Email: id@wanadoo.fr

INNOVATION INSIGHTS
75 International Boulevard
Suite 400, Toronto
Ontario MW 6L9, Canada
Tel: 1-800-999-4129
Fax: 1-416-798-9174
Website: www.the-alliance.com

INNOVATIONS ET RESEAUX POUR LE DEVELOPPEMENT
Energy Development Group
46, rue de Provence
Paris 75009, France
Tel: 33-1-4874-6215
Fax: 33-1-4874-5052
Website: www.ired.org/

INSTITUT DE DEVELOPPEMENT DE L’ECONOMIE SOCIALE
139 141 Avenue Charles de Gaulle
Neualy-sur-Seine 92200
France
Tel: 33-1-4745-9010
Fax: 33-1-4745-9019

INSTITUT DE FORMATION EN DEVELOPPMENT ECONOMIQUE COMMUNAUTAIRE
420, rue St. Paul Est, 2e etage
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Tel: 1-514-281-2081
Fax: 1-514-281-5010
Website: www.ifdec.qc.ca

INSTITUTE FOR DEMOCRACY INEASTERN EUROPE
2000 P Street NW, Suite 400
Washington DC 20036
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-466-7105
Fax: 1-202-466-7140
Email: idee@idee.org
Website: www.idee.org

INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT
P.O.Box 520
Wfliiamstown MA 01267
United States of America
Tel: 1-413-458-9828
Fax: 1-413-458-3323
Email: iicdinfo@berkshire.net
Website: www.iicd-volunteer.org

INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT LIMITED
14 Bird-wood Street
Netherby Adelaide 5062
Australia
Tel: 61-8-8272-8088
Fax: 61-8-8272-8588
Email: jleake@iid.org
Website: www.iid.org/

INSTITUTE FOR LOCAL SELF-RELIANCE
242518th Street
NW Washington DC 20009-2096
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-232-4108
Fax: 1-202-332-0463
Email: nseldman@ilsr.org
Website: www.ilsr.org

JAPANESE NGO CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
5th Floor,
Saito Building Kanda Nishiki-cho 2-9-1
Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 101-0054
Japan
Tel: 81-3-3294-5370, 81-3-3294-5397
Fax: 81-3-3294-5398
Email: janic@jca.apc.org
Website: www.jca.apc.org/janic

JAPAN FOUNDATION
Ark Mori Building
1-12-32 Akasaka Minato-ku
Tokyo 107-6021
Japan
Tel: 81-3-5562-3480, 81-3-5562-3481
Fax: 81-3-5562-3492
Email: webmaster@jpf.go.jp
Website: www.jpf.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY (AUSTRIA)
Liechtensteinstrasse 12/10
Wien 1090
Austria
Tel: 43-1-315-6565
Fax: 43-1-315-6566
Website: www.jica.go.jp/

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY-JICA
P.O.Box Q866, QVB, 1230
Suite 605, Level 6
44 Market Street
Sydney, 2000, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9279 3500
Fax: +61292793511
Email: jicasyd@mpx.com.au
Website: www.jica.go.jp/

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY
8, Rue Sainte-Anne
Paris 75001, France
Tel: 33-1-4020-0421
Fax: 33-1-4020-9768
Website: www.jica.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY
6-13F, Shinjuku Maynds Tower
1-1, Yoyogi 2-chome, Shibuya-ku
Tokyo 151-8558, Japan
Tel: 81-3-5352-5311, 81-3-5352-5314
Email: jicagap-www@jica.go.jp
Website: www.jica.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY-MEXICO
Ejercito Nacional #418
Col. Polanco Mexico D.F. 11570,
Mexico
Tel: 52-5-545-2476, 52-5-545-2512
Website: www.jica.ific.or.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY-JICA
AI. JanaPawiall 18
1st. floor Warszawa 00-116, Poland
Tel: 48-22-627-0164
Fax: 48-22-620-1669
Website: www.jica.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY
P. K. 117 Kavaklidere
Ugur Mumcu Cad, 88/6 B Block
Gaziosmanpasa Ankara 06700, Turkey
Tel: 90-312-447-2530
Fax: 90-312-447-2534
Website: www.jica.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY
45 Old Bond St.
London WIS 4AG
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7493-0045
Fax: 44-20-7493-0042
Email: info@jica.co.uk
btomokos@jica.co.uk
Website: www.jica.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan
Via the Office of the Executive Director for Japan
The World Bank, 1818 H Street
NW, MC 12-315
Washington DC 20433
United States of America
Fax: 1-202-522-1581
Website: www.jica.go.jp/index.html

JAPAN OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
Shuwa Kamiya-Cho Bidg. 3-13
Toranomon 4-Chome Minato-Kutokyo
105-0001
Japan
Tel: 81-3-5473-0980
Fax: 81-3-5473-0987
Website: www.2.odn.ne.jp/jodc/index.htm

JAPAN REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
Toranomon Mitsu Building
3-8-1 K.usarnigasela, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100, Japan
Tel: 81-3-3501-5211
Fax: 81-3-3581-1304

JESUIT REFUGEE SERVICE
P.O.Box 522
24 Roslyn Street
Kings Cross NSW
Australia
Tel: 02 9356 3888
Fax: 02 9356 3021
Email: book@uniyajrs.apana.org.au

JESUIT REFUGEE SERVICE
C.P. 6139 Roma
Borgo S. Spirito
4 Roma 00193
Italy
Tel: 39-06-6897-7386
Fax: 39-06-687-9283
Email: international@jesref.org
Website: www.jesref.org

JESUIT REFUGEE SERVICE
1616P St., NW, Suite 400
Washington DC 20036
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-462-0400
Fax: 1-202-328-9212
Email: web.keeper@jesref.org
Website: www.jesref.org

JEUNESSE ET RECONSTRUCTION
8-10 Rue de Trevise
Paris 75009
France
Tel: 33-1-4770-1588
Fax: 33-1-4800-9218
Email: camp@volontariat.org
Website: www.volontariat.org

JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE, INC.
105 Chauncy St., 6th Floor
Boston MA 02111
United States of America
Tel: 1-617-451-8147
Fax: 1-617-451-9973
Website: www.thunderhawk.com/jvs/jvs00.htm

JEWISH WOMEN INTERNATIONAL
1828 L Street, NW Ste 250
Washington DC 20036
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-857-1300
Fax: 1-202-857-1380
Email: jwi@jwi.org
Website: www.jewishwomen.org

JM FOUNDATION
60 East 42nd Street
Room 1651, New York
NY 10165
USA
Tel: (212) 687-7735
Fax: (212) 697-5495

JOHANNITER INTERNATIONAL
Dept. of Johanniter-Unfall-Hilfe
e.V.(JOIN)
Frankfurter Str. 666
D-51107 Koein, Germany
Tel: +49 – 221 – 89009-470/471, +49 – 30 – 269 97-180
Fax: +49 – 221 – 89069-473
Email: paul@juh.bg.de
Petra.Roith@juh-cologne.de
Website: www.juh.de
www.johanniter.de

JOHANNITER-UNFALLHILFE
Frankfurter Str. 666
K61n D-51107, Germany
Tel: 49-221-8900-90, 49-30-26-9970
Fax: 49-221-8903-100, 49-30-2699-7555
Email: anfrage@juh-cologne.de
Website: www.juh-cologne.de

JOHN A. HARTFORD FOUNDATION, THE
55 East 59th Street, 16th Floor, New York
NY 10022-1178, USA
Tel: (212) 832-7788
Fax: (212) 593-4913
Email: mail@jhartfound.org
Website: www.jhartfound.org/

JOHN D. & CATHERINE T. MACARTHUR FOUNDATION
140 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60603,
USA
Tel: 312 726 8000
Fax: 312 920 6258
TDD: 312 920 6285
Email: 4answers@macfound.org
apply@macfound.org
Website: www.macfdn.org

JOHNS HOPKINS CENTER FOR COMMUNICATION PROGRAMS, PHOTOSHARE – MEDIA/ MATERIALS CLEARINGHOUSE
III Market Place, Suite 310
Baltimore MD 21202, USA
Tel: 1-410-659-6280
Email: lvelasco@jhuccp.org
Wifb: www.jhuccp.org/mmc/photoshare

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
Institute for Policy Studies, Center for Civil Society Studies
1740 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington DC 20036-1983
United States of America
Tel: 1-410-516-5389
Fax: 1-410-516-8233
Email: cwessner@jhu.edu
Erin.Lynch@jhu.edu
webmaster@sais-jhu.edu
Website: www.jhu.edu/ips

JOHN VEALE OPTOMETRIST
P.O.Box 669
Christchurch, Aotearoa
New Zealand
Tel: + 643 366 1248
Fax: +643 365 0321
Email: john.h.veale@stra.co.nz

JOSEPH ROWNTREE CHARITABLE TRUST
The Garden House, Water End
York Y030 6WQ
United Kingdom
Tel: +44-(1904)627-810
Fax: +44-(1904)651-990
Email: info@jrct.org.uk

JOURNAL OF MICROFINANCE
790 TNRB Marriott School
Brigham Young University Provo UT
84602
United States of America
Tel: 1-801-378-6690
Fax: 1-801-378-8098
Website: www.microjournal.com

JOURNAL OF HUMANITARIAI ASSISTANCE
Department of Peace Studies
Bradford University Bradford BD7 1]
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-1274-23-5239
Fax: 44-1274-23-5240
Email: editors@jha.ac
Website: www.jha.ac

JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONA DEVELOPMENT
John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
1 Oldlands Way Bognor Regis West
Sussex P022 9SA
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-1243-77-9777
Fax: 44-1243-84-3232
Email: cs-journals@wiley.co.uk
Website: www.wiley.co.uk

JOURNAL OF SMALL BUSINES MANAGEMENT
JSBM, Bureau of Business and
Economic Research
West Virginia University
P.O. Box 6025
Morgantown WV 26506-6025
United States of America
Tel: 1-304-293-7534
Fax: 1-304-293-7061
Website: www.hj.se/ice/journaIsJ.htm

JOVENES DEL TERCER MUNDO
C/Lisboa, 6, 2°
Madrid 28008
Spain
Tel: 34-91-544-7620
Fax: 34-91-549-8334
Email: jtm@jovenestercermundo.org
Website: www.jovenestercermundo.org

JOYCE MERTZ-GILMORE FOUNDATION
218 East 18th Street
New York, NY 10003-3694
USA
Tel: +1212475-1137
Fax: +1212 777-5226
Email: jmgf@jmgf.org
Website: www.jmgf.org

JUBILEE DEBT CAMPAIGN
C/o Drop the Debt, 37-39 Great
Guildford Street
London SE1 OES
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7922-1111
Fax: 44-20-7922-1122
Email: ashok@jubileedebtcampaign.org.uk
Website: www.jubileedebtcampaign.org.uk

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT INTERNATIONAL
2780Janitell Road
Colorado Springs CO 80906
United States of America
Tel: 1-719-540-0200
Fax: 1-719-540-8770
Email: jai@jaintl.org
staff@jaintl.org
Website: www.jaintl.org

JUSTACT
1850 K Street, NW. Suite 1000
Washington DC 20006
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-862-1572
Fax: 1-202-862-1144
Email: info@justact.org
Website: www.justact.org

JUSTACT
333 Valencia Street, Suite 330
San Francisco CA 94103
United States of America
Tel: 1-415-431-4204
Fax: 1-415-431-5953
Email: info@justact.org
Website: www.justact.org

JUST DOLLARS TRUST
P.O.Box 4232
Christchurch 8015
New Zealand
Tel: 64-3-366-9978
Fax: 64-3-366-9971

JUSTICIA Y PAZ
Rafael de Riego, 16 – 3° Dcha.
Madrid 28045
Spain
Tel: 34-91-506-1828
Fax: 34-91-506-1905
Email: juspax@nodo50.org
Website: www.nodo50.org/juspax KALAYAAN
St Francis Centre, Pottery Lane
London W11 4NQ
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7243-2942
Fax: 44-20-7792-3060
Email: 100711.2262@compuserve.com

KALMARLATINAMERIKAGRUPP
Ulfeldsgatan 20
Hellstrom Kalmar SE-392 44
Sweden
Tel: 46-4-8047-6915

KAMLOOPS FOUNDATION
P.O. Box 15
Kamloops BC V2C 5K3
Canada
Tel: (250) 554-5072
Fax: (250) 554-7736
Email: pnygraig@mail.ocis.net
Website: www.kamloopsfoundation.com

KAMPAGNE FUR SAUBERE KLEIDUNG KOORDINATIONSBURO
C/o DGB-Bildungswerk
Postfach 10 30 55
Hans-Bockler-Strasse
39 Dusseldorf 40476
Germany
Tel: 49-211-4301-317
Fax: 49-211-4301-500
Email: CCC-D@dgb-bildungswerk.de
Website: www.aubere-kleidung.de

KATALYSIS NORTH/SOUTH DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIPS
1331 North Commerce Street
Stockton CA 95202, USA
Tel: 1-209-943-6165
Fax: 1-209-943-7046
Email: katalysis2@aol.com
afindley@katalysis.org
Website: www.katalysis.org

KATASTROPHENHILFE-DIAKONISCHES WERK DER EKD REFERAT
StafflenbergsttaBe 76
Stuttgart 70184
Germany
Tel: 49-711-2159-321
Fax: 49-711-2159-422
Website: www.katastropheti-hilfe-ekd.de

KATALYSIS NORTH/SOUTH DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIPS
1331 North Commerce Street
Stockton CA 95202, USA
Tel: 1-209-943-6165
Fax: 1-209-943-7046
Email: katalysis2@aol.com
afindley@katalysis.org
Website: www.katalysis.org

KATASTROPHENHILFE-DIAKONISCHES WERK DER EKD REFERAT
Stafflenbergstta Be 76
Stuttgart 70184
Germany
Tel: 49-711-2159-321
Fax: 49-711-2159-422
Website: www.katastrophen-hilfe-ekd.de

KATHOLISCHE ZENTRALSTELLE FUR ENTWICKLUNGSHILFE E.V. (CENTRAL BUREAU FOR
DEVELOPMENT AID)
Postfach 1450
Mozartsttasse 9, 52064 Aachen
Germany
Tel: +49 2414420
Fax: +49 241442188
Contact: Secretary General

KENT HARRISON FOUNDATION
P.O. Box 918
Agassiz BC VOM IAO
Canada
Tel: (604) 796-9599
Fax: (604) 796-2429

KERKEN IN AKTIE
Postbus 456
Utrecht 3500 AL
Netherlands
Tel: 31-30-880-1456
Fax: 31-30-880-1457
Email: info@kerkeninaktie.nl
Website: www.kerkeninaktie.nl

KFUK-KFUM
Box 2054
Skeppsbron 28
Stockholm
Sweden
Tel: 46-8-677-3000
Fax: 46-8-677-3010
Email: kfuriks@kfuk-kfum.se
Website: www.kfuk-kfum.se

KILLARNEY FOUNDATION, THE
70 Hennessey Drive
Winnipeg MB R3P IP5, Canada
Tel: (204) 261-9232
Email: kheming@hotrnail.com

KIMBERLEY AND DISTRICT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
477 – 2nd Avenue
Kimberley BC VIA 2P6, Canada
Tel: (250) 427-3277
Fax: (250) 427-5277
Email: bjohnsto@sd6.bc.ca

KINDERBERG E.V.
Lotterberg Street 16
Stuttgart 70499, Germany
Tel: 49-711-1399-400
Fax: 49-711-1399-4099
Website: www.kinderberg.de

KINDERMISSIONSWERK (PMK)
Stephanstr. 35
52064 Aachen, Germany
Tel: +49 (0) 24244610
Fax: +49 (0) 241 44 61 40
Email: kontakt@kindermissionswerk.de
Website: www.kindermissionswerk.de

KING BAUDOUIN FOUNDATION
International Steering Committee For the Advancement of Rural Women ISC Secretariat
Rue Brederodestraat 21
Brussels 1000, Belgium
Tel: 32-2-511-1840, 32-2-551-2020
Fax: 32-2-511-5221, 32-2-513-3932
Email: infonet@kbs-frb.be
delamper.m@kbs-frb.be
Website: www.kbs-frb.be

KIRCHE IN NOT/OSTPRIESTERHILFE
(Church In Need)
Postfach 12 09
61452 K. onigstein/ Taunus
Germany
Tel: +49(0)61742910
Fax: +49 (0) 6174 34 23, 291 195
Email: int.zentrale-kin@kirche-in-not.org
Website: www.kirche-in-not.org

KIRCHLICHER ENTWICKLUNGSDIENST
Postfach 210220
Herrenhauser Str. 12
Hannover 30419
Germany
Tel: 49-511-2796-0
Fax: 49-511-2796-717
Website: www.ekd.de/agked/ked.html

KITCHENER AND WATERLOO COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, THE
Marsland Centre -11th Floor
20 Erb Street West
Waterloo ON N2L IT2
Canada
Tel: (519) 725-1806
Fax: (519) 725-3851
Email: rsmith@kwcf.ca
Website: www.kwcf.ca

KUMABUNDNIS OSTERREICH
Mariahilferstrasse 89/24
Wien 1060
Austria
Tel: 43-1-581-5881
Fax: 43-1-581-5880
Email: klimabuendnis@magnet.at
Website: www.oneworld.at/klimabuendnis/

KNIGHTSBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL
Knightsbridge International
Post Office Box 4394
West Hills, CA 91308-4394
USA
Tel: 1(818) 372-6902
Fax: 1(818) 716-9494
Website: www.knightsbridge.org
Contact: Chairman

KOBE-YWCA
#103 412-1 Kokura
Kiyama-cho, Miyaki-gun Saga-ken
Japan
Tel: 81-9-4292-8364
Fax: 81-9-4292-8364

KOFINANZIERUNGSSTELLE FUR ENTWICKLLINGSZLISAMMENARBETT
Finance Group/CSP
TurkensttaBe 3
Wien 1090
Austria
Tel: 43-1-317-6797
Fax: 43-1-317-6796
Email: kfs.austria@magnet.at

KONFEDERACJA PRACODAWC6W POLSKICH
ul. Andyjska 8
Warszawa 01-493
Poland
Tel: 48-22-685-9977
Fax: 48-22-685-9977

KONRAD-ADENAUER-STIFTUNG
Rathausallee 12
Postfach 1260
53757 St. Augustin
Germany
Tel: +49 22412460
Fax: +49 2241246591
Email: zentrale@kas.de
Website: www.kas.de

KONTAKT DER KONTINENTEN
Amersfoortsesttaat 20
Soesterberg 3769 AS
Netherlands
Tel: 31-34-635-1755
Fax: 31-34-635-4735
Email: kdk@kdk-nl.org
Website: www.kdk-nl.org

KONTAKTSTELLE FUR ANGEPASSTE TECHNOLOGIE & ENTWICKUJNCSZUSAMMENARBEIT E.V.
Zionskirchenstrasse 23
Berlin 10119
Germany
Tel: 49-3028-2339-8
Fax: 49-3028-2339-8

KOOPERATION EVANGELISCHER KIRCHEN UND MISSIONEN
Missionstr. 21 Basel 4003, Switzerland
Tel: 41-61-268-8232, 41-61-268-8122
Fax: 41-61-268-8268
Email: lnfoMedien@compaserve.com
kem_basel@compuserve.com
Website: www.medicusmundi.ch/KEM.htm

KOORDINIERUNGSSTELLE DER OSTERREICHISCHEN BISCHOFSKONFERENZ FUR INTERNATIONALE
Entwicklung und Mission
Turkenstrasse 3, Vienna 1090
Austria
Tel: 43-1-317-0321, 43-1-317-0322
Fax: 43-1-317-0321-85
Email: info@koo.at
Website: www.koo.at/

KREDITANSTALT FUR WIEDERAUFBAU (KFW)
Palmengartenstrasse 5-9
60325 Frankfurt/ Main, Germany
Tel: +49 69 74310
Fax: +49 69 74312944
Email: kfw.vsb@kfw.de
iz@kfw.de
Website: www.kfw.de

KRESGE FOUNDATION, THE
3215 West Big Beaver Road
P.O.Box 3151
Troy, MI 48007-3151
USA
Tel: (810) 643-9630
Website: www.kresge.org

KRISTNA FREDSR6RELSEN
Box 1768
Stockholm 111 87
Sweden
Tel: 46-8-453-6840
Fax: 46-8-453-6829
Email: kristtia.freds@ekuc.se
Website: www.krf.se

KVTNDEKNES U-LANDSUDVALG
Women and Development
Borgergade 14, 2
Copenhagen 1300
Denmark
Tel: 45-3315-7870
Fax: 45-3332-5330
Email: kulu@kulu.dk
Website: www.kulu.dk/

KVINNOFORUM, STIFTELSEN
Kungsgatan 65
Stockholm 111 22
Sweden
Tel: 46-8-5622-8800
Fax: 46-8-5622-8850
Email: kvnnoforum@kvinnoforum.se
Website: www.kvinnoforum.se

ABOR MUNDI
Via Tuscolana
167 Roma 00182
Italy
Tel: 39-06-702-0751
Fax: 39-06-702-2917

LA FONDATION DU GRAND MONTREAL-THE FOUNDATION OF GREATER MONTREAL
1, Place Ville-Marie bureau 1508
Montreal QC H3B 2B5, Canada
Tel: (514) 866-0808
Fax: (514) 866-4202
Email: infos@fondationdugrandmontreal.org

LA LECHE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL
P.O.Box 4079
1400 N. Meacham Rd.
Schaumburg IL 60168-4079
United States of America
Tel: 1-847-519-7730
Fax: 1-847-519-0035
Email: PRDept@llli.org
Website: www.lalecheleague.org

LAND O’LAKES INTERNATIONAL DIVISION
P.O. Box 64406
St. Paul, Minnesota 5564
United States of America
Tel: +1800 8518810
Fax: +1612 4812556
Email: mcash@landolakes.com
Website: www.landolakes.com

LANDSRADET FOR SVEMGES UNGDOMSORGANISATIONER
Kungsgatan 74
5tr Stockholm 111 22
Sweden
Tel: 46-8-440-8670
Fax: 46-8-203-530
Website: www.youth.se/lsu

LATET, THE ISRAELI HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATION (LATET)
10 Simon Dubnov Street
Tel Aviv
Israel 64732
Tel: 972 3 695 07 57,972 3 695 07 57, 972 54 421 086
Fax: 972 3 695 06 22
Email: equisrae@inter.net.il
equisrae@inter.net.il
gilles_darmoa@fantinegroup.com
Website: www.glownet.com/latet

LATIN AMERICA COMMITTEE
P.O.Box 7153, Wellington
New Zealand
Tel: 04 389 8699, fax 04 472 6374
Email: Pbruce@actrix.gen.nz

LATINO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
231618th St. NW
Washington DC 20009
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-588-5102
Fax: 1-202-588.5204
Website: www.cdsc.org/ledc/index.html

LATTER-DAY SAINT CHARITIE (LDSC)
50 E North Temple Street
7th Floor
Salt Lake City, UT 84150
United States
Tel: (801) 240-1201, (801) 240-5750, (801) 240-3026
Fax: (801) 240-1964
Email: grflake@ldschurch.org
ldsc@ldschurch.org
Contact: President & CEO

LAZARUS HILFSWERK
Luxemburger Str. 305 Hurth
Koln D-50354
Germany
Tel: 49-2233-9725-0
Fax: 49-2233-9725-44
Email: bgst@Iazarus.de
Website: www.lazarus.de

LEGACY INTERNATIONAL
1020 Legacy Drive
Bedford VA 24523
United States of America
Tel: 1-540-297-5982
Fax: 1-540-297-1860
Email: mail@legacyinlt.org
Website: www.legacyinlt.org

LEGAMBIENTE
Settore Volontariato
Via Salaria 403
Rome 00199
Italy
Tel: 39-06-8626-8326
Fax: 39-06-8626-8319
Email: legambiente.vol@tiscalinet.it
Website: www.legambiente.com

LEGER FOUNDATION
130 Ave de l’Epee
Montreal H2V 3T2, Canada

LEPROSY MISSION AUSTRALIA THE
P.O. Box 293
37 Ellingworth Parade
Box Hill VIC, Australia
Tel: 03 9890 0577
Fax: 03 9890 0550
Email: tlmaust@leprosymission.org.au
Website: www.leprosymission.org.au

LEPROSY MISSION
P.O.Box 10 227, Auckland
New Zealand
Tel: 09 630 2818
Fax: 09 630 0784
Email: enquiries@tlmnz.org.nz

LETHBRIDGE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, THE
740 – 4th Avenue South, Suite 407
Lethbridge AB T1J ON9, Canada
Tel: (403) 328-5297
Fax: (403) 328-6061
Email: lcfdn@telusplanet.net
Website: www.lethbridgecommunityfoundation.org

LIAISON COMMITTEE OF DEVELOPMENT NGOS TO THE EUROPEAN UNION
Square Ambiorix 10
Brussels 1000
Belgium
Tel: 32-2-743-8760, 32-2-743-8785
Fax: 32-2-732-1934
Email: sbiesemans@clong.be
Website: www.oneworld.org/liaison/index.html

LIAISON OFFICE OF THE ORTHODOX CHURCH TO THE EUROPEAN UNION, THE
40, Place de Jamblinne de Meux
1030 Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 734 89 87 / 732 44 22
Fax: +32 2 734 90 72
Email: oeu@compuserve.com

LIFE FOR RELIEF & DEVELOPMENT
17300 West 10 Mile Rd
Southfield, MI 48075
Tel: (248) 424-7493
Fax: (248) 424-8325
Email: reliefusa@aol.com
Website: www.lifeusa.org
Contact: Head/President

LIFE-LINK FOUNDATION
Uppsala Science Park-Glunten
Uppsala 75183, Sweden
Tel: 46-1850-4344
Fax: 46-1850-8503
Email: lifelink@kuai.se

LIGA ESPANOLA DE LA EDUCAC16N Y LA CULTURA POPULAR
Vallehermoso, 54 -1°
Madrid 28015, Spain
Tel: 34-91-594-5338
Fax: 34-91-447-2247
Email: laliga@coiigde.org

LIGA ESPANOLAPRO-DERECHOS HUMANOS
C/ Hermosma 114 Bajo.
Madrid 28009, Spain
Tel: 34-91-401-9695
Fax: 34-91-401-9695
Email: lepddhh@lander.es
Website: www.lander.es/~lepddhh

LINKUP
11112 Midvale Rd.
Kensington MD 20895
United States of America
Tel: 1-301-949-8693, 1-301-949-2481
Fax: 1-301-949-8693

LIONS CLUB INTERNATIONAL
Sjobjornsvagen 5
Stockholm 117 67
Sweden
Tel: 46-8-744-5900
Fax: 46-8-726-9200
Website: www.lions.org

LIVE & LEARN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
Ross House, 3rd Floor
247-251 Flinders Lane
Melbourne VIC
Australia
Tel: 03 96501291
Fax: 0396501391
Email: livelearn@optusnet.com.au

LOCAL INITIATIVES SUPPORT CORPORATION
733 3rd Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10017
United States of America
Fax: 1-212-682-5929
Website: www.liscnet.org

LONDON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
Covent Garden Market
130 King Street
London ON N6A IC5
Canada
Tel: (519) 667-1600
Fax: (519) 667-1615
Email: dstuart@lcf.on.ca
Website: www.lcf.on.ca

LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
Centre for Civil Society
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7955-7205
Fax: 44-20-7955-6039
Email: ccs@lse.ac.uk
Website: www.lse.ac.uk/Depts/ccs

LOS MEDICOS VOLADORES/FLYING DOCTORS
P.O. Box 445
Los Gatos CA 95031
United States of America
Email: info@flyingdocs.org
Website: www.flyingdocs.org

LUTERHJALPEN
Svenska kyrkan
Uppsala 75170
Sweden
Tel: 46-1816-9500
Fax: 46-1816-9772
Email: lutherhjalpen@svenskakyrkan.se
Website: www.svenskakyrkan.se/lutherhjalpen

LUTHERAN WORLD FEDERATION (LWF)
Department of World Service
150, route de Ferney (PC) Box 2100)
CH-1211, Geneva 2
Switzerland
Tel: 41-22-79161 II
Fax: 41-22- 798 86 16, 41-22-791-6630
Email: info@lutheranworld.org
Whole@lutheranworld.org
Website: www.lutheranworld.org

LUTHERAN WORLD FEDERATION
P.O. Box 488
Albury NSW 2640
Australia
Tel: 61-2-6021-5329, 61-8-8267-7300
Fax: 61-2-6021-4504
Email: lca.administtarion@lca.org.au
Website: www.lca.org.au/

LUTHERAN WORLD RELIEF-CANADA
1080 Kingsbury Avenue
Winnipeg Manitoba R2P 1W5
Canada
Tel: 1-204-694-5602
Fax: 1-204-694-5460
Email: clwr@mbnet.mb.ca
Website: www.lwr.org/

LUTHERAN WORLD RELIEF
700 Light Street
Baltimore, MD 21230, USA
Tel: (410) 230-2800, 1-410-2302700
Fax: (410) 230-2882
Email: lwr@lwr.org
‘Website: www.lwr.org/

LUTHERAN WORLD RELIEF
390 Park Avenue South
New York NY 10016-8803, USA
Tel: 1-212-532-6350
Fax: 1-212-213-6081
Email: lwr@lwr.org
Website: www.lwr.org

LYNDE AND HARRY BRADLEY FOUNDATION
P.O. Box 510860
Milwaukee, Wl 53203-0153
Tel: (1-414) 291-9915
Fax: (1-414) 291-9991
Website: www.townhall.com/bradlley

MACARTHUR FOUNDATION
Vito Alessio Robles 39-103
Ex-Hacienda de Guadalupe
Chimalistac Mexico D.F. 01050, Mexico
Tel: 52-5-661-2911
Fax: 52-5-661-7292
Email: aliguori@macfdn.org
Website: www.macfound.org

MACARTHUR FOUNDATION
The John D. and Catherine T.
Mac Arthur Foundation
Office of Grants Management
140 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago IL 60603, USA
Tel: 1-312-726-8000
Fax: 1-312-920-6258
Email: 4answers@macfound.org
Website: www.macfound.org

MACFARLANE BURNET INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH LTD, THE
PO Box 254, Yarra Bend Rd
Fairfield VIC, Australia
Tel: 03 9282 2275
Fax: 03 9482 3123
Email: robynw@burnet.edu.au
Website: www.burnet.edu.au

MACRO INTERNATIONAL
11785 Beltsville, Dr. Calverton Md 20705
United States of America
Tel: 1-301-572-0200
Fax: 1-301-572-0999
Email: hoch@macroint.com
Website: www.macroint.com

MADRESELVA
Plaza de Padron
II bajo Madrid 28029, Spain
Tel: 34-91-730-1035
Fax: 34-91-378-2383
Email: madreselva@mad.servicom.es
Website: www.servicom.es/madreselva

MAEF / HWWB
Tartsay, Vilmos U, Mithra Center
Budapest H-1126
Hungary
Tel: 36-1-214-8160
Fax: 36-1-214-8162, 36-1-214-8159
Website: www.soc.titech.ac.jp/icm/wind

MAISON DE L’AFRIQUE, LA
2 rue de Viarmes
Paris 75040
France
Tel: 33-1-5565-3551
Fax: 33-1-5565-3591

MAISON DE L’ECONOMIE ET DU DEVELOPPEMENT
8 rue du petit Malbrande
Annemasse Cedex 74100
France
Tel: 33-4-5087-0987
Fax: 33-4-5092-5656
Email: MED@cur-archamps.fr

MAKING CENTS
3417 Brown St NW, Suite 100
Washington DC 20010
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-232-3590
Fax: 1-202-232-3598
Email: info@makingcents.org
fiona@makingcents.org
Website: www.makingcents.org

MALTESER HILFSDIENST E.V./MALTESER FOREIGN AID DEPARTMENT
Kalker Hauptsttasse 22 – 24
51103 Koln
Germany
Tel: + 49 221 9822 157, +49 221 9822 151
Fax: +49 221 9822 159 or 179
Email: Vera.Fenske@malteser-ald.de
malteser@maltanet.de
Website: www.malteser.de

MAMA CASH-INVESTMENT FUND FOR WOMEN INITIATIVES
Postbus 15686
Amsterdam 1001 ND
Netherlands
Tel: 31-20-689-3634
Fax: 31-20-683-4647
Email: mamacash@mamacash.nl
jos@mamacash.nl
Website: www.mamacash.nl/mamacash

MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING FOR NCOS
97A St Aldates
Oxford, 0X1 IBT, UK
Tel: +44(0)1865423818
Fax: +44 (0) 1865 723051
Email: enquiries@mango.org.uk
Website: www.mango.org.uk
Contact: Mr. Barbara Johnstone
E-Mail: bjohnstone@mango.org.uk

MANAGEMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION-SOUTH ASIA
137 Old Nawala Road Nawala Sri Lanka
Tel: + 94 (74) 404017
Fax: + 94 (74) 404016
Email: mdfsa@mdfsa.lk
Website: www.mdf.nl
Contact: Directors: Mr Willo Brock and Mr L.M.William

MANAGEMENT SCIENCES FOR HEALTH
165 Allandale Road, Boston
Massachusetts 02130-3400
United States of America
Tel: 1-617-524-7799
Fax: 1-617-524-2825
Email: development@msh.org
Website: www.msh.org

MANDAT INTERNATIONAL
31, chemin William Rappard
Bellevue 1293
Switzerland
Tel: 41-22-959-8855
Fax: 41-22-959-8851
Email: info@mandint.org
Website: www.mandint.org

MANI TESE
Piazza ie Gambara
7/9 Milano 20146, Italy
Tel: 39-02-407-5165, 39 2 4697188
Fax: 39-02-404-6890, 39 2 4812296
Email: manitese@manitese.it
info@manitese.it
Website: www.manitese.it

MANOS UNIDAS
Barquillo 38 – 2°
Madrid 28004, Spain
Tel: 34-91-308-2020
Fax: 34-91-308-4208
Website: www.manosunidas.org

MAP INTERNATIONAL
2200 Glynco Parkway
Brunswick, Georgia 31525
USA
Tel: 1-912-265-6010, 1-912-280-6666, 1-912-280-6602/1-800-225-8550
Fax: 1-912-265-6170
Email: jgarvin@map.org
sbaroody@map.org
Website: www.map.org
Contact: President and CEO
Email: mnyenhuis@map.org

MAPLE RIDGE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
P.O. Box 370
Maple Ridge BC V2X 8K9, Canada
Tel: (604) 466-3312
Fax: (604) 466-3489
Email: loisholm@shaw.ca

MAR – BULGARIAN YOUTH ALLIANCE FOR DEVELOPMENT
5, Triaditza Street
Sofia 1000
Bulgaria
Tel: 359-2-980-2037
Fax: 359-2-980-2651, 359-2-980-2051
Email: mail@mar.bg
Website: www.mar.bg/

MARCH OF DIMES BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION, THE
1275 Mamaroneck Avenue
White Plains, NY 10605
USA
Tel: (914) 428-7100
Email: research_grants@modimes.org
Website: www.modimes.org/

MARIST MISSION CENTRE
3 Mary Street
Hunters Hill NSW
Australia
Tel: 02 9816 3187
Fax: 02 9879 7126
Email: rjnissen_mmc@hotmail.com

MARK FOUNDATION, THE-ORGANIZATION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITY, RESPECT AND COMMUNICATION
*vregaten 21
5003 Bergen, Norway
Tel: +47-936-13203
Fax: +47-555-39430
Email: rud-bak@online.no

MARLBOROUGH BRANDT GROUP
1A, London Road Marlborough
Waltshire SN8 1PH, UK
Tel: 44-1672-51-4078
Fax: 44-1672-51-4922
Email: mbguk@compuserve.com
Website: www.mbg.org

MARUIA SOCIETY, INC.
P.O.Box 756, Nelson, New Zealand
Tel: 03 548 3336
Fax: 03 548 7525

MARYKNOLL
MaryknoU Sisters, P. 0. Box 311
Maryknoll NY 10545-0311, USA
Tel: 1-914-941-7575
Fax: 1-914-923-0733
Email: hphillips@mksisters.org
Website: www.maryknoll.org

MATRIX, INC.
The New Business Center, 220 Carrick
Street
Suite 320 Knoxville TN 37921
United States of America
Tel: 1-615-525-6310
Fax: 1-615-637-3920
1675 MAX PLANCK SOCIETY FOR

NACHAIA-NEW BEGINNING FOUNDATION
67 Vitosha Blvd.
Sofia 1000
Bulgaria
Tel: 359-2-980-6329, 359-2-989-7145
Fax: 359-2-981-5072

NANAIMO COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
619 Comox Road, #106
Nanaimo BC V9R 5V8
Canada
Tel: (250) 714-0047
Fax: (250) 754-5774
Website: www.nanaimocommunityfoundadon.com

NAPANEE DISTRICT CHARITABLE FOUNDATION THE
P.O. Box 91
Napanee ON K7R 3L4
Canada
Tel: (613) 354-7333
Fax: (613) 354-4613
Email: ndcf@kingston.net

NAPOLI: EUROPA-AFRICA
Via M. Schipa
115 Napoli 80122
Italy
Tel: 39-081-66-0606
Fax: 39-081-66-4638
Email: neaitaly@tin.it

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR BUSINESS ECONOMICS
1233 20th Street NW #505
Washington DC 20036, USA
Tel: 1-202-463-6223
Fax: 1-202-463-6239
Email: nabe@nabe.com
Website: www.nabe.com

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCIES
1100 17th Street, N.W, Suite 500
Washington DC 20036, USA
Tel: 1-202-265-7546
Fax: 1-202-265-8850
Website: www.nacaa.org

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS
400 North Capitol Street, Suite 390
Washington D.C. 20001, USA
Tel: 1-202-624-7806
Fax: 1-202-624-8813
Email: info@nado.org
Website: www.nado.org

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LARGE FAMILIES
Ma’rcius 15. Ter.8
Budapest 1056, Hungary
Tel: 36-1-117-4909
Fax: 36-1-117-4563

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
ul. Polna 40 – 301
Warsaw 00-635, Poland
Tel: 48-22-625-0496, 48-22-625-8050
Fax: 48-22-625-8050

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
750 First Street NE Suite 710
Washington DC 20002, USA
Tel: 1-202-898-1302
Fax: 1-202-898-1312
Email: mfriman@nasda.com
Website: www.nasda.com

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN BUSINESS OWNERS
1411 K Street, N.W, Suite 1300
Washington D.C. 20005
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-347-8686
Fax: 1-202-347-4130
Email: national@nawbo.org
Website: www.nawbo.org

NATIONAL BUREAU OF ASIAN RESEARCH
4518 University Way NE, Suite 300
Seattle Washington 98105
United States of America
Tel: 1-206-632-7370
Fax: 1-206-632-7487
Email: nbr@nbr.org
Website: www.nbr.org

NATIONAL BUSINESS ANGELS NETWORK
3rd Floor, 40-42 Cannon Street
London EC4N 6JJ
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-181-447-9422
Fax: 44-181-882-6978
Website: www.nationalbusangels.co.uk

NATIONAL CENTER FOR CHILDREN IN POVERTY
Research Forum on Children, Families and the New Federalism
154 Haven Avenue
New York NY 10032
United States of America
Tel: 1-212-304-7132
Fax: 1-212-544-4200, 1-212-544-4201
Email: info@researchforum.org
Website: www.researchforum.org

NATIONAL CENTER FOR FAMILY PHILANTHROPY
1220 ‘Nineteenth Street, NW, Suite 804
Washington DC 20036, USA
Tel: 1-202-293-3424
Fax: 1-202-293-3395
Email: abby@ncfp.org
Website: www.ncfp.org

NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING AND EXPLOITED CHILDREN
Charles B. Wang International Children’s Building
699 Prince Street Alexandria
Virginia 22314-3175
United States of America
Tel: 1-703-274-3900
Fax: 1-703-274-2200
Website: www.ncmec.org

NATIONAL CENTER FOR NONPROFIT BOARDS
2000 L Street, NW, Suite 510
Washington DC 20036-4907
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-452-6262
Fax: 1-202-452-6299
Email: info@ncnb.org
ncnb@ncnb.org
Website: www.ncnb.org

NATIONAAL CENTRUM VOOR ONTWIKKEUNGSSAMENWERKING
National Centre for Cooperation in Development
Vlasfabriekstraat 11
Brussels 1060, Belgium
Tel: 32-2-539-2620, 3225361135
Fax: 32-2-539-1343, 3225361906
Email: johan.cottenie@ncos.ngonet.be
Website: www.ncos.ngonet.be

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN COUNCIL IN JAPAN
Japan Christian Center 24
2-3-18 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku
Tokyo 169
Japan
Tel: +81 3 32 03 03 72
Fax: +81 3 32 04 94 95
Email: ncc-j@jca.ax.apc.org
Contact: General Secretary

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIVE PHILANTHROPY
2001 S St., NW, Suite 620
Washington DC 20009
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-387-9177
Fax: 1-202-332-5084
Email: info@ncrp.org
Website: www.ncrp.org

NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON PLANNED GIVING
233 McCrea Street, Suite 400
Indianapolis Indiana 46225
United States of America
Tel: 1-317-269-6274
Fax: 1-317-269-6276
Email: ncpg@iupui.edu
Website: www.ncpg.org

NATIONAL COMMUNITY CAPITAL ASSOCIATION
924 Cherry Street, 2nd Floor
Philadelphia PA 19107-2411
United States of America
Tel: 1-215-923-4754
Fax: 1-215-923-4755
Email: ncca@communitycapital.org
Website: www.communitycapital.org

NATIONAL CONGRESS FOR COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
1030 15th Street, NW, Suite 325
Washington DC 20005
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-289-9020
Fax: 1-202-289-7051
Email: rpriest@ncced.org
Website: www.ncced.org

NATIONAL COOPERATIVE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION – NCBA
1401 New York Avenue, NW, Suite 1100
Washington, DC 20005
United States of America
Tel: +1202 6386222
Fax: +1202 6381374
Email: ncvo@ncba.org
Website: www.cooperative.org

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS
Regent’s Wharf, 8 AU Saints Street
London Nl 9RL
United Kingdom
Tel: 44-20-7713-6161
Fax: 44-20-7713-6300
Email: ncvo@compuserve.com
helpdesk@ncvo-vol.org.uk
Website: www.ncvo-vol.org.uk

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES IN AUSTRALIA
Locked Bag 199
379 Kent St
Sydney NSW
Australia
Tel: 02 9299 22 15
Fax: 02 9262 45 14
Email: info@ncca.org.au
Website: www.ncca.org.au

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES IN KOREA
Kwang Wha Moon P. O. Box 134
Christian Building, Room 706
136-46 Yunchi-dong, Chongro-ku
Seoul 110-470
Korea
Tel: +82 2 763 8427
Fax: +82 2 744 6189
Contact: General Secretary

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA
1111 19th, NW Suite 1000
Washington DC 20036
United States of America
Tel: 1-301-604-7983
Fax: 1-301-604-0158
Website: www.nclr.org

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF THE CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN THE USA
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 850
New York NY 10115
United States of America
Tel: 1-212-870-2227
Fax: 1-212-870-2030
Email: news@ncccusa.org
Website: www.ncccusa.org

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
2030 M Street NW, Fifth Floor
Washington DC 20036-3306
United States of America
Tel: 1-202-728-5500
Fax: 1-202-728-5520
Email: contactndi@ndi.org
Website: www.ndi.org

OAK LAKE & AREA FOUNDATION
Box 100, Oak Lake MB ROM 1PO
Canada
Tel: (204) 855-2810
Fax: (204) 855-2810
Email: srampton@mts.net

OBSERVATOIRE PERMANENT DE LA COOPERATION FRANCAISE
32, rue Le Pelerier
Paris 75009
France
Tel: 33-1-4483-8850
Fax: 33-1-4483-8879
Email: cfsi@globenet.org
Website: www.nt.oneworld.nl

OCASHA-CRISTIANOS CON EL SUR-OBRA COOPERACION APOST6LICA SEGLAR HISPANO-AMERJCANA
Jose Maranon
3 Madrid 28010
Spain
Tel: 34-91-445-4022
Fax: 34-91-594-2665
Email: ocasha-ccs@nodo50.org
Website: www.nodo50.org/ocasha-ccs

OIKOCREDIT- ASSOCIATION DE LA REGION DE COLMAR
IB rue des Ecoles
Ostheim F-68150
France
Tel: 33-389-49-0092
Fax: 33-389-49-0092
Website: www.oikocredit.org

OIKOCREDIT – ASSOCIATION DU PAYS DE MONTSeLIARD ET DU TERRJTOIRE DE BELFORT
24 avenue Wilson
Montbeliard 25200
France
Tel: 33-381-95-3897
Fax: 33-381-94-2070
Website: www.oikocredit.org

OIKOCREDIT – EARTH BANK
1-11 Katsura Kinoshita-cho
Nishikyo-ku Kyoto
Japan
Tel: 81-75-394-0497
Fax: 81-75-394-0497
Email: aoki-r@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp
Website: www.oikocredit.org

OIKOCREDIT-ECUMENICAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATIVE SOCIETY
Runggadgasse 231
Brixen 39042
Germany
Tel: 39-472-83-3026
Fax: 39-472-83-7774
Website: www.oikocredit.org

OIKOCREDIT – ECUMENICAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATIVE SOCIETY
Adenauerallee 37
Bonn 53113
Germany
Tel: 49-228-2679-861, 49-228-2679-862
Fax: 49-228-2679-865
Email: EDCS.Westdt@t-online.de
Website: www.edcs.org/de

OIKOCREDIT – ECUMENICAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATIVE SOCIETY
P.O. Box 13-302
Centenario 208, Colonia del Carmen
Coyoacan Mexico D. F. 04100
Mexico
Tel: 52-5-688-9031
Fax: 52-5-688-9031
Email: edcsmx@laneta.apc.org
Website: www.oikocredit.org

OIKOCREDIT – ECUMENICAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATIVE SOCIETY
EC. Hooftlaan 3
Amersfoort 3818 HG
Netherlands
Tel: 31-33-463-3122, 31-33-422-4040
Fax: 31-33-465-0336
Email: info@oikocredit.org
Website: www.oikocredit.org

OIKOCREDIT – ECUMENICAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATIVE SOCIETY
Beim Bahnhof, P.O. Box
Oberdiessbach 3672
Switzerland
Tel: 41-31-772-0040
Fax: 41-31-772-0044
Website: www.oikocredit.org

OIKOCREDIT – ECUMENICAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATIVE SOCIETY
1511 K Street, NW, Room 1165
Washington DC 20005
United States of America
Tel: